Gleanings from "The Kinmundy Express"

1944

Compiled by Dolores Ford Mobley

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Please note!!! The articles on this web site were originally reported in weekly editions of "The Kinmundy Express" (also known at one time as "The Marion County Express") which are now located on microfilm at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library - Newspaper Microfilm Depository in Springfield, Illinois. Please note that the gleanings listed within this compilation do NOT represent entire articles in most cases, but instead, general and summarized information with special interest being focused upon data which is significant to genealogical research.

Jan. 6, 1944:

- Here’s a V-Mail from PFC Cecil BRIM, who is now in Italy. It sure gives us great pleasure in knowing that this paper is getting to the boys in these remote places. His letter was written Dec. 20th. Here is what he says: I have received the Kinmundy Express in England, Africa, Sicily, and now in Italy, and it is the only way that I learn the news that is happening around home. I received 3 of them today and read the letters from the boys and girls in the service and I sure like to read things like that. The Zatso is what interests me the most, why don’t you tell the g.m. to do her own housework and then you go join the army before she declares war on you. Give my regards to all the folks back at Kinmundy. I still remember them for I was one of the first 3 to leave there and have never been back.

- Here’s another V-Mail from Paul PARRISH, SC 2 c, in fact there are 2 letters. He could not say enough on one letter, so he wrote 2 of them. Paul is still sailing the ocean seas on the U.S.S. Pelias. These letters were written on Dec. 16. He says: During the long months which I have spent away from home and friends, the Kinmundy Express has truly been welcome here. It’s open friendliness and warm sincerity in conveying news of folks at home and their interests to us away from home shores, have certainly won its way into my heart. Even a letter from home can not tell us more about the events happening at home, to those left behind nor of the interest of the others in the services at home and abroad. A fellow never knows how much a little news from home can be welcomed until he is where he can’t get any. Now even the home town paper meets this need in a big way. They say the army fights on its stomach but I can guarantee that the Navy does for I have to help fill it. Since I am a ship’s cook, one thing I have created since coming in the Navy is an appetite for good food, that is when its prepared by someone else. However, we haven’t lost any of the crew because of my cooking. I would like to wish all my friends at home A Very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

- Here’s V-Mail, written on Dec. 16th by Cpl. John JEZEK who is sojourning in North Africa. He’s in the hospital, or was at that time, but didn’t say what for. Here’s what he has to say: As I’m in the hospital now. I will take the time to write you these few lines, which I have been intending to do for quite some time, but just couldn’t get around to it. But now I just lay around, smoke cigs, and read, though first comes my letter writing. You don’t know how much I thank you for the paper. You don’t know how much you appreciate it until you are a long ways from home. So thanks again. As you probably know I am in North Africa and there’s not much I can tell you as Major A BROOM, Jr., has told you everything that I could tell you, so I won’t waste any time on the subject. I suppose the old town is the same old place, no new changes made, but any way it’s ‘Home Sweet Home’. Now I must take a dose of mineral oil, so I must say so long.

- Here’s one from Pvt. George MILLER, who is still seeing the sights of merry old England. His letter was written on Dec. 22nd. He is really thanking the general manager for a package sent to him. You see, George is one of the boys out of the office and the only one overseas thus far. So we felt a little Christmas box was due him. George always did have a way with the fairer sex and we are just a little afraid he might bring one of those English girls back with him. Anyway, here is what he says: Just received a swell package from you and want to thank you a million for knowing just the right things to send. The hair oil is more precious than gold here. The only thing we can get in the way of it is a starchy substitute that makes the hair a gooey mess. This afternoon we gave a Christmas party for about 250 kids and really had a swell time. The head of the school told us the only presents or parties the children would received would be what we gave them. Each of us who attended played host to 5 or 6 kids and had just as much fun as they. It’s been said and probably true that these children have seen more war than the average doughboy saw in the World War I. I’ve finally been to London and it is just as full of life and gaiety as other large cities. The uniforms of all the allied nations of the world are found there. The natives of the city are more American in dress and speech than in other sections of this country. Maybe I should add that the girls are quite nice and it doesn’t take long to find one who is willing to show a fellow the town. There isn’t much else in the way of news now. Tell the rest of the family hello for me and any time you find time to write, let me know what Carl, Annette and Guin are doing. Thanks again for the Express.

- Here’s a nice letter from PFC Robert GRAY, who at the present time is maneuvering around in Tennessee. He says: I have been going to write you for some time to let you know I am getting the paper and appreciate it very much. It is a little difficult to write out here where there isn’t anything to write on or with. The paper has been getting to me regular enough. In fact, I get the paper at almost every mail call as we just have mail call on weekends. The boys I work with like to read the letters the fellows write to the paper and they like to read the Zatso column too. None of the papers the other fellows get have any letters from service men in them. We have been on maneuvers 5 weeks now and about all we do is dig trenches in these rocks and ride. The roads in the maneuver area are so crooked that all our vehicles have the batteries run down from blowing their horns at their own tail lights. I want to let all the people who sent me Christmas greetings know that I appreciated them very much, but I couldn’t write them all a letter. It is starting to rain now so I will close.

- Allen T. SULLIVAN died in the Veteran’s Hospital in Marion, Ill. Sunday after an illness of several months, aged 83 years, 9 months. Services were held from the Linton Funeral Home with interment in Evergreen Cemetery. Allen T., son of John W. and Harriett SULLIVAN, was born in Louisville on Apr. 2, 1860, and here he grew to manhood. After the death of his parents, he made his home with his sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Frank WILSON, as he was never married. This is the only surviving member of the immediate family. He was a painter and decorator by trade. When just a lad, he joined the Christian Church in Louisville. He was a Spanish-American War Veteran, being a member of Co. 9, 9th Ill. Regt.

- Mr. C.R. ALDERSON has received word that his nephew, Lt. Tom CARLTON of the Marines, was killed in action during the invasion of Tarawa. Lt. Carlton was the grandson of Barney ALDERSON, formerly of here.

- Cpl. Tracy DOWNS of Fort Sheridan spent Monday and Tuesday here with his mother, Mrs. Mattie DOWNS and sister, Thelma.

- After serving 22 years as a substitute rural mail carrier from Kinmundy postoffice, Edward W. DOOLEN tendered his resignation which became effective the first of the year. His place is being taken by Fred BOYD. Ed is a few moons past the 3 score mark, and naturally feels just a little better, sitting around warming his feet by the stove than he does exposing himself to the hardships which must be endured by a rural mail carrier.

- Ellis JOHNSON, who is employed by the C. & E.I.R.R. as a locomotive fireman, sustained a broken ankle Saturday when he leaped from the cab of his engine just before a head on collision of 2 trains near Goreville, Ill. JOHNSON was firing the engine one the south bound freight.

- Mr. and Mrs. Lester VANSCYOC were host and hostess to a family dinner Sunday in honor of their son S3 c Junior who is home from Idaho after finishing his boot training there. Those present were Mr. and Mrs. Cal LANE, Mr. and Mrs. Burdette SHAFFER and family, Mr. and Mrs. Cecil LANE and sons, Mr. and Mrs. Early LANE and family, and Mr. and Mrs. Virl SEE and daughter of Greenville.

- S3 c Charles Lee DOOLEN departed Wednesday for Chicago to resume his duties at Great Lakes.

- N.C.B. Joe SLOVICK has returned to California after 2 weeks visit here with his mother and many friends.

- Mrs. Alonzo FRENCH, who submitted to a serious abdominal operation in St. Mary’s Hospital in Centralia Tuesday is improving.

- Wilson School (from last week): Pvt. George MEYER returned on Monday to his camp in Arkansas after spending his furlough here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chris MEYER and family.

- Pvt. James O. EAGAN of Louisiana spent Saturday and Sunday here with his family.

- Pleasant Grove (from last week): As Tob WILKINS was returning from work Thursday night, he narrowly escaped serious injury when he drove into a freight train at the Brubaker crossing. Mr. WILKINS states that frost on his windshield was the cause of his not seeing the moving train until he was to near to stop. He turned his car along the side of the train which dragged the car several yards up the track. Other than shock, he received no injuries, but the car was badly damaged.

- Pleasant Grove (from last week): Pvt. John GRIFFIN, who spent a short furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred GRIFFIN, called on David SHAFFER, Saturday.

- Pleasant Grove (from last week): Paul SWIFT left last Tuesday for army duty.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. Igo JONES of near Homer have a baby girl. Mrs. Susanna JONES spent several days with them.

- Meacham: One morning last week as Ruben CRAIN was out on the highway near the country managed by Mr. TATE, he was very much surprised to see a buck deer cross on the highway in front of him. Several people have reported seeing the deer.

- Swift School: Pvt. Emmett GARRETT of Alabama is spending his furlough here with his parents. He spent the weekend in St. Louis with friends.

- Swift School: Lt. Cecil LOWE and wife visited here this week with Sam LOWE and family, and Cleve DOOLEN and wife.

- Swift School: Lyle SWIFT of Great Lakes is here spending his furlough with his parents, Raymond SWIFT and wife.

- Victor YATES S3 c, who has been stationed in Idaho, has completed boot training and is here a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles YATES and family.

- Lyle SWIFT S3 c has finished boot training at Great Lakes and is enjoying a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond SWIFT.

- Pvt. Ralph HOYT, who has been stationed in Kansas, is here visiting his wife and relatives while enroute to Maryland.

- Prairie Grove: Several from here attended the funeral of Delmar SCHNEIDER in Farina on Friday.

- PFC James E. GARRETT, who is stationed in Alabama has been enjoying furlough here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT.

- Mrs. Sadie SEE, who is a patient at Salem Memorial Hospital as well as can be expected from a broken arm. Due to her advanced age, recovery is slow.

- Meadow Branch (from last week): Frank JOHNSON went to Jefferson Barracks to see his son, Charles, before he is sent overseas.

- Omega (from last week): Word was received here Monday that Wm. BURTON had died.

- Omega (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Roy MILLICAN received a letter from their son, Ralph, last week stating that he is now in England.

- The BRASEL families have received word of the death of Davis KELL of Benton which occurred Wednesday. He was the husband of the former Maude BRASEL, who was raised here.

- Pleasant Grove: Several from here attended the funeral of Mrs. Shan SPITLER at Summit Prairie Church on Friday.

- Pleasant Grove: Lt. John W. SHAFFER of Nebraska arrived New Year’s Day for a short visit with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Guy SHAFFER, and other relatives. He will be accompanied back to Nebraska by his wife, she being a graduate nurse was called her to care for her grandmother, Mrs. Jane HADDEN, who was seriously ill with pneumonia in the Salem Memorial Hospital, but is slowly improving.

- East Meadow Branch (from last week): Joe SLOVICK of the U.S. Navy is enjoying his furlough with his mother, Mrs. Mary SLOVICK. Mrs. A. BEEBERGER of Chicago is also here spending the holidays with her mother and Joe.

- East Meadow Branch (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Dale HAMMER of Sumner enjoyed Christmas supper with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.F. ROBB.

- East Meadow Branch (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. W.F. ROBB called on the Pid BASSETT family Sunday.

- Cadet Charles V. VALLOW, who is attending school in North Dakota, came home Monday for a few days visit with his mother, Mrs. W.B. VALLOW and family.

- Mrs. Annie YOUNG returned to her home here Friday from North Carolina, where she had spent Christmas vacation with her son, Lt. Charles Wm. YOUNG.

Jan. 13, 1944:

Here’s another letter from PFC Derrill STIPP, who is now in Italy. He thanks us for the cigarettes, but he really means this part for the Chamber of Commerce and those who donated for this cause. He says: I am going to write you a letter. I have thanked you for the paper which I get in bunches every once in awhile. Well, I read Major BROOM’s letter. Sure was good. Here is some of my experiences. When we landed in Africa, we started sleeping on the ground and the same in Sicily and we are sleeping in the ground now. You know the holes we dig. We have been in action several times, should have some planes to our credit. They have strafed us some with ME109. We managed to chase them off. The artillery shells of both sides have been going over our heads. We have had wet feet a lot and I have had the rheumatism a lot. A good bed sure would help. Haven’t saw one after we left the States. There is a lot more, but no room, not very good at spelling. Thanks again for the cigarettes and paper.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Floyd EAGAN, who is now watching the hula girls. He says: I want to write a few lines to let you know where I am, but I can’t say anything about what I am doing. I am still in the Hawaiian Islands, but on a different island now. They are beautiful, but they are not what you folks back there think they are, and I wouldn’t take all that I have seen here to be back in Kinmundy, but I wouldn’t take anything for what I have seen. I just came back from mail call and I sure did good tonight. I got four letters and that sure helps. The letters from the boys in the service is the first thing I look for. I would like to thank all the neighbors and friends for the beautiful greeting cards which I received for Christmas.

- Here’s another one from Cpl. John JEZEK, who is now out of the hospital. He says: As I came back from the hospital yesterday, at least I can write and tell you my different address, as I have some spare time and you have been so nice to the boys and I in the service with our good old home town paper. Nothing like it when you get thousands of miles away from home. Mr. VALLOW I wish you would thank the Chamber of Commerce for their carton of cigs as they’re not always so plentiful, and all my friends that took the trouble to send me packages and cards. Thanks again Mr. VALLOW. Regards to everyone.

- Here’s another one from Cpl. Louie SOUTIER, who is still in merry old England. He says: Will drop you a letter to let you know I have changed my APO. No. now because I sure want to get my paper. I got three of them the other day. I get most of my mail in a bunch. Sure enjoy getting them as I like to read the letters the other boys write. Well I have seen a lot of country since I have been over here and a lot of the U.S.A., but I still like Illinois the best. We sure get plenty of rain here, guess it rains here about all the time. Well it will soon be another year gone. Sure hope the war gets over by next year so everyone can get home. Well guess I will sign off wishing you a Happy New Year.

- Here’s one from Cpl. John McCULLEY, who would much rather see the belles of Kinmundy than the hula dancers of Hawaii. He says: I made a New Year’s resolution to write you a letter and thank you for the paper that I have been receiving. I meant to write sooner but never got around to it. The last issue I received was Nov. 25. I sure do enjoy getting the paper very much. It is like getting a letter from mother and dad. I sure do enjoy Maj. BROOM’s letters a lot. He was telling in his last letter about how they traveled in North Africa and how rough the railroads were. I still say that is a lot better than walking like we are having to do. I quite agree with Harvey JOHNSTON and Howard HELM about the Islands not being what you people back home think they are. For the life of me I can’t see why anyone would come over here on a honeymoon or vacation. You mentioned in the last paper about me being over here somewhere making it a little hot for the Japs. Well so far we haven’t done much but expect to in the near future. J.N. did you leave plenty of quail for seed next year? I hope so for I am in hopes that next hunting season we are all back home. We see quite a few pheasants here but we are not allowed to shoot any of them. Well I guess this is about enough for this time so I will begin to close. I am looking forward to a nice boat ride back to the States and when I get back to Kinmundy, I am staying right there. Of all the places I have been in the last 3 years while I have been in the Army, Kinmundy has them all beat a long ways. As the natives say, "Aloha".

- Mrs. Maria MAHON WEST, 84, wife of the late George W. WEST of Houston, Texas, died Jan. 5. She was born and reared in Kinmundy, later with her husband moved to Kansas, but for the past 22 years has made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Georgiana ALLEN of Houston. The son, Frank G. WEST, died in 1938. She is survived by the daughter; a brother, George B. MAHON of Green Mountain, Colo; 3 granddaughters, Mrs. Pat H. BEEVENS and Miss Patricia WEST, both of Houston, and Mrs. Thomas H. HALE of Baytown, Texas.

- Mrs. Merle KLINE, south of town, has received word of the death of her brother, Pvt. Wm. R. CARTER, 24, son of Mr. and Mrs. John CARTER of Johnston City, Ill. Pvt. CARTER was wounded Dec. 8 in Italy and died the same day according to the telegrams received here by his parents. He has been in the Army since March 24, 1941, and overseas for 8 months, and in Italy for 3 months. Pvt. CARTER was a anti-aircraft gunner in the armored division of the field artillery.

- Mr. Albert HAMPSTEN received a telegram from the War Dept. on Jan. 8 stating that his son, Pvt. Louis Ervin, had been wounded in action. Pvt. HAMPSTEN is in the Marines and this is the second time he has been wounded, the first time being in early Sept. 1942. Pvt. HAMPSTEN is 19 years of age and has been in the service for more than 2 years. He is in the Southwest Pacific. The message did not state the nature of his wound. (A picture of Pvt. HAMPSTEN was included.)

- Clifton Brant LEMAY, Kenneth Dean SMITH, and Ira Garrett MERRITT have received their notice from the local Selective Board to report for induction.

- Mrs. O.E. GARRETT entered the Salem Hospital Saturday and underwent an operation Tuesday morning for a hernia.

- Mrs. J.H. BACKENSTO and daughter, Shirley, of Hartford, spent the first of this week here with her mother, Mrs. Elizabeth ATKINS and son, Lt. Raymond ATKINS.

- Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD has received word that her son, Daniel A. has been promoted from Sergeant to Staff Sergeant.

- We have received 2 more greetings this week. One is from James HAMMER, U.S.N., who is sailing the 7 seas on the U.S.S. Heron. It was dated Dec. 17 and arrived here last week via V-Mail. Thanks Red for remembering us.

- The other one is from PFC Dale WRIGHT, who is also seeing the sights of merry old England. His card was not dated, so I don’t know when it was sent. Thanks Dale, come again.

- And I might convey the information to Sgt. Beryl DISS that I believe his letter did some good because the flag is now floating on the square. It has been quite a task to get someone to take responsibility of putting it up and taking it down. But finally at the last meeting of the City Council, they put this on the shoulders of the Chief of Police. So everything is honkey-dorey now.

- East Zion: Mrs. Maude JONES died Sunday at her home. She had been in poor health and confined to her bed for the past 2 weeks. She leaves her husband, 2 sons, Robert at home, and Russell of Wilmington. Services were held at Zion Church.

- Mrs. Chas ROBB of Decatur spent this week here with her sister, Mrs. Elizabeth ATKINS.

- Green Ridge: Mrs. LOWMAN of Salem is finishing the term of school at Greenridge, which Mrs. Rada CALDWELL had to give up on account of her health.

- Prairie Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Sam REICHERT attended the funeral of Herman GERHARDT at St. John’s Evangical Church Monday.

- Swift School: Virgil LIVESAY and family spent Sunday with Clyde GARRETT and family.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Leland BRASEL spent Sunday in Kinmundy with Mrs. Lizzie ATKINS and Lt. Raymond ATKINS.

- Swift School: Mrs. Frank JONES and Mrs. James JONES and son, Jimmie, spent Monday afternoon with Mrs. Clyde BASSETT.

- Pleasant Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Jack BARKSDALE attended the funeral of his grandfather, Mr. BANDELOW at the Baptist Church in Iuka Wednesday.

- Pleasant Grove: Lester BASOM of the armed forces is spending a furlough here with his wife and other relatives.

Jan. 20, 1944:

- Our community was very much shocked last Thursday afternoon when the news was spread that Pleasant ROBNETT was seriously ill, having just suffered a stroke of paralysis. Reports from his bedside were constantly given out to the effect that he was showing no improvement. Another shock was received Sunday morning when the news was given out that he passed away. It just couldn’t seem possible. Services were held Tuesday in the High School Gymnasium with interment in Evergreen Cemetery. As a mark of respect, the schools were dismissed at noon and all business places were closed from noon until after the funeral. Mr. ROBNETT entered the business world in Kinmundy in 1913 by erecting a small garage and has been in business ever since with the exception the time he took out for the service of his country in World War I. He was a mechanical genius. If anyone wanted a piece of machinery repaired or made, they went to Pleasant. He erected an ice plant in 1922 making practically all of the workings. This business has grown and he has enlarged the capacity of the plant several different times. Pleasant had not been in good health for sometime, but no one realized how serious his condition was. Pleasant F. ROBNETT, son of Noah J. and Lillie CHALFANT ROBNETT, was born near Kinmundy on Sept. 15, 1891, and died Jan. 16, 1944. He was well known for his mechanical ability having operated the Star Garage here since March 1913. On June 17, 1918, he was inducted into the Army in World War I to serve his country as a mechanic. After returning from the Army, he erected a building and began the operation for an ice plant for this city and the surrounding community. Later he also became engaged in the bulk oil business. When the hard road was completed thru this city, he erected a modern filling station known as the White Star Super Service Station. On June 23, 1925 he married Miss Lura WILLIAMS, and they 5 children. He leaves his wife; 2 daughters, Zola and Helen; 3 sons, Pleasant Jr., Jimmy and Quinten; an aunt, Miss Anna CHALFANT. A list of relatives and friends attending from out-of town was included.

- Tennessee TUCKER WHITE was born Aug. 13, 1874 in Fayette Co., Ill., and died at the home of her daughter on Jan. 16, 1944. She was the daughter of Jones and Mary TUCKER. At an early age she joined the Baptist Church. On Sept. 18, 1894, in the home of her parents, she married Arthur WHITE. She resided south of Kinmundy practically all of her life with the exception of 1 year in which she lived in Iuka. She had the misfortune of breaking her hip on Nov. 17, 1943. Afer being confined to Salem Hospital, she was moved to the home of her daughter. She leaves 1 son, Stanley WHITE now serving in the armed forces in the Hawaiian Islands; 1 daughter, Mrs. Nellie BLAIR, north of Kinmundy; her husband; 2 grandchildren, Agnes HAYES and Gerald WHITE; 1 great-grandchild, Jimmie Louis HAYES; 1 sister, Martha WANTLAND, and 4 brothers, John TUCKER of California; Wade TUCKER of Arrowsmith, Ill.; Frank TUCKER and Casey TUCKER of St. Louis, Mo. Services were held from Pleasant Grove Church with interment in Evergreen Cemetery.

- Mr. J.D. BARBEE of our city, entered Barnes Hospital in St. Louis last Thursday for cancer of the mouth.

- Mrs. Mary MAYER, who has been an invalid for several years due to a broken hip, entered Barnes Hospital in St. Louis on Dec. 23 and underwent a very serious bone operation.

- Robert A. MARTIN, son of James and Ella NOY MARTIN, was born in Gilman, Ill. on June 15, 1898, and died at Centralia on Jan.15, 1944. He was married to Leona O’DELL of Kinmundy on May 19, 1923 at Champaign, Ill. He had lived in Champaign and Urbana since Aug. 1922, when he became an Illinois Central Brakeman. He was promoted to conductor in Oct. 1942. He was preceded in death by his mother and 2 sons, Robert and Billy, who died in infancy. He leaves his wife; a son, Carol, 15; and a daughter Marilyn, 12; his father, James A. MARTIN; and 2 sisters, Mrs. Mabel BACH of Champaign and Mrs. Blanche LIETZ of Bradley, Ill. Services were held from Owens Funeral Home.

- Here’s a letter from Pvt. Pug JENKINS, who almost sent his letter here by getting a furlough. He says: Well thought I would drop you another line as I have a new address. I sure like to read the letters from the other boys that are overseas, because I think I will be there soon myself. But I can’t say when, because it is a military secret. Well I came to this camp last Monday and I would rather be back in the armored division where I used to hear the tanks roll, but they sent me here, so there isn’t a lot I can do about it. Robert GRAY’s article was very interesting, because I was down in Tennessee on maneuvers 3 months. Well, Mr. VALLOW, thanks again for the paper and keep up the good work. It makes everyone feel like being home and I hope it isn’t very long until we are. Well, I am saying "Thanks again for the paper.".

- Here’s one from Sgt. Raymond MOELLER, who wrote the letter on Christmas Day in merry old England. He says: Well it has been quite some time since I have written to you and have come a long way cross. How is everybody back home by now? I am just as good as always and thinking very much on getting a little better as we have just finished a grand Christmas dinner and I know that you have heard that everything now-a-days is shipped across the pond. Well, by the looks of our dinner today that we had just everything and they possibly could have no more better than we had back in the States. Would like to write about our trip over here but all that I can say is that it was a grand voyage and am looking forward to just one more and that is the one that will take us back to America, then that will be my last one for sure. I think that I received the best Christmas present that one could expect to get as I got my first mail before Christmas and it included paper. The mail could not have come at any better time. The paper was Nov. 26 issue. So it was rather old but to me it was really new and I enjoyed it very much and as soon as I get to my new location I will send you my new address or have my folks give it to you. I had the opportunity to get out of this country a few days ago and it is a beautiful place as much as I have ever seen so far, and I was rather amazed to see the livestock that they have here and being rather interested in livestock they looked very good to me. I think they have some of the largest milk cows that I have ever seen. The people are somewhat different, but most of them are very friendly and easy to make friends with and that helps a lot. The young boys and girls are a little quiet for a few minutes then when they get started, they talk and keep on talking. I feel kind of sorry for them as they have gone through what I hope none of us will ever see or hear about in our country. They had a Christmas party for a lot of the youngsters here on this base and it sure did make a lot of them happy I remember one of them saying that it was not Santa as he has a cotton beard, but they sure did enjoy it and I think all the soldiers that took part in it enjoyed it as much as the little ones. I know that I sure enjoyed it as all the things they got came from the States. Well the 6th of January I will have been in the Army 2 years. That seems rather a long time but I do not know where I could have possibly got the experience that I have got in them 2 years anyplace or at any coast and it looks as if there are a lot more new ones ahead. Well I am out of news, if that is what a person can call it so until next time. I hope that every one is well and happy at home and I wish every one back home A Happy New Year.

- Here’s another from England from Cpl. T. Edward JEZEK, written on Dec. 30. He says: As I find time now to write, I want to thank you for your most welcome paper, The Kinmundy Express, for I cannot explain to you how I feel toward the paper. I always look forward to it twice a month. I’ve been in jolly old England for 4 months and I find it very comfortable for most of us Americans. It is very odd as we cannot find things as we were used to such as beer, it is warm, very little whiskey. Also in the line of eating. In every city, town and village there is a darkness. It has been that way every since the war begun. You should hear the odd names they give various things such as pictures, a string of wagons, etc. I also find the people are very different in parts of this Island, in language and in relation. Almost as our north and south. The negro over here is rated the same as a white man, of course, we don’t think much of that. Some day in the future, we tell our army career in happiness, especially the boys around Kinmundy. Again, I thank you for the paper.

- Here’s one from Cpl. Chas. GARRETT, written Jan. 2, in New Guinea. He says: Just finished reading the Kinmundy paper, so thought I would drop you a line to let you know that I sure appreciate getting it. Sometimes it takes quite awhile for it to reach me, but it is still news from home to me and I certainly enjoy reading it. I don’t stay in one place very long so I can’t expect to get it all the time. I have never seen anyone that I knew back there. Lawrence BASSETT and I were at the same place for awhile, but I was moved up before I had a chance to see him. Everyone back there seem to be doing a swell job of putting out supplies for the armed forces and I think that before long the Nips are going to wish they had never heard of Pearl Harbor. Thanks again for the paper and I hope that it won’t be too long before I see the old home town again.

- Here’s one from the Aleutians written on Jan. 3 from Sgt. Tiny ELLIS. He says: Just another one was mentioned within your column previously and wish to fill the request of my dear commentator. Your papers have come frequently thru terrain seldom heard of, but playing an interesting part in this war, but must say they are accomplishing great achievements toward keeping morale posted on local news of home affairs. So may I thank you for kind appreciation in sending vital information we have no other way of accumulating on local news. Publishing letters written by men on various fronts of the world explain many answers our mothers and fathers worry over that are not necessary. Nearly 2 years ago this continent was invaded by desperate fighting people called Nipponese, who could never get along with themselves much less peaceful people as we are. And thru our 2 great military leaders, Lt. Gen. Simon B. BUCKNER and Vice Admiral Thomas C. KINKAID, we eliminated the yellow rascals from the Aleutians and in which we duly credit forces that may of participated within it. Maybe it could have been done sooner with a higher cost of human lives, but I don’t think it would have been worthy in cause, so let us congratulate our leaders and it’s staff for completing the job it set out to do. Not quite 2 years ago I left the States for destination unknown, as to what we were to do, had little interest, only wanting to complete our mission and return home where our loved ones live, and yet we have not fulfilled our goal by defeating the enemies. I’ve seen men feed the fish several times by leaning over the rail or bow of a ship, but never have I seen men thrown off in the water to walk ashore with ice freezing on their clothing as soon as the air hit them (only in movies). Those are just a few incidents seen throughout my army life. The interior of Alaska is quite interesting with Eleuts and Eskimo people populating 3 quarters of it and really sports in hunting, trapping and mining is a popular event to us soldiers, for we’ve been softies so long it made us realize what we were fighting for. Delightful scenery can be obtained from a distance thru cars passing by a small highway leading into gorgeous mountains with streams of cold water seeping down crevices of snow capped mountains into a booklet of running fish called trout. Now drifting westward, I leave your imagination stress upon itself of hardships were may have suffered on a barren isolated spot within the Pacific ocean. Recreation facilities are wonderful compared to what I’ve read on various other front lines. We have had a few celebrities, such as Errol Flynn, Martha Q. Briscoll, Ruth Carroll and Jimmy Dodd. Also a representative from Washington, Captain Eddie Rickenbacker, who played a vital part in World War I of the Air Corps. Movies are nothing but the latest pictures made such as: Coney Island, Sweet Rosie O’Grady, and many more I can’t recall just now. So if ever the war is over, just pack up your old gray bonnet and catch the next transport going to Tokyo for a vacation under Northern Lights of Alaska.

- Here’s one from James ELLIS way down in Florida. Say what is this? The JEZEK boys sure hit the jackpot this week by writing. Anyway here is what he says: As it has been over a year sine I have written to you here goes. I have a new address which I hope to report at the end if my paper holds out. I am 9 miles but of Tampa at the Mac Dill Field. This is a replacement training unit. We have Flying Fortresses only. The Chamber of Commerce has over rated Florida about 500 per cent. This beautiful sunshiny weather (when the sun shines) is so damp that it penetrates to the bone and makes me think of damp April weather in Kinmundy. I don’t mind telling you I’ll still take the snow and zero weather in preference to this. We are quartered in shacks discarded by General Lee in the Civil War as unfit for Confederate soldiers. The cracks in the floor and sides are so large a four week old pig would have no trouble getting into the building at all. My first night was spent beneath 3 blankets and my sheep skin flying suit and shoes still I woke up cold. The southern hospitality was forgotten long ago and the poor civilians pay as much for food as they do rent. Tell those people who do not know how to appreciate Kinmundy and it’s climate until it is to late - believe me, I know. I have a crew which I will have all the time now. They are scattered across the U.S., one from Michigan, Washington, D.C., California, Texas, Pennsylvania, Oklahoma and North Dakota. I have one real American, a full blood Indian from a tribe in Oklahoma. My particular duty is that of a tail gunner in the famous Flying Fortress. On a trip the other day I was thinking of my kid brother, Vernon JEZEK, and all the other kids in Kinmundy on what a thrill this ride would be for them and what fun. It was only routine for me. It seems so funny to start out with your regular clothes on around plus a sheepskin flying suit, sheepskin overshoes, helmet and gloves. You are perspiring terribly but within an hour you are real cold and the weather is from 10 to 30 below zero. When you are only one mile and three fourths into the air you start using oxygen and the temperature is ten to 25 degrees above zero at 6 miles in the air, 30,000 feet the temperature is zero to 15 below, and at 38,000 feet (7 miles) the air is so thin you can’t talk. A fly can’t even fly, all he can do is crawl around on the plane, if he attempts to fly he falls. If your oxygen mask came off you would be dead in 2 minutes at this height. The tail of a Fortress has plenty of room. I can store plenty of ammunition and can moved freely. This is the easiest position to shoot. Our greatest danger is flak, which comes from anti-aircraft shells fired from the ground and explode and puncture your ship on the order of shrapnel. After cruising around for an hour or so at 20,000 feet many is the time I wish that I had a thermos bottle filled with hot coffee. After 30,000 feet occasionally one becomes affected with the "Bends". This is a nitrogen air bubble which lodges in one of your joints, causing severe pain, and you act just like a person with a severe case of rheumatism. Bubbles at this height are seven times their size at ground level. The way we avoid bends is starting using oxygen on the ground and continue on your way up. This eliminates the nitrogen from your body. Please tell everyone to keep writing the boys in the service even though they don’t hear. A boy overseas is permitted to write just 2 letters a week in most war zones. I understand they are mighty sad when no letters come for him. This applies in cases of men overseas. I am enclosing $1.00 which I want you to throw into a fund you have for the defraying of expenses for the newspaper sent to the boys. I haven’t received the paper or any other mail for 6 weeks but eventually it will catch up with me. To the people back home (for the sake of the service men) please forget the strikes and bittering for we all want to come home to stay as quick as we can. Help us all you can for we have no choice about anything.

- Lt. (jg) Carl E. and Mrs. PRUETT arrived Sunday and visited until Tuesday with Mr. and Mrs. W.S. PRUETT and friends. On Tuesday they departed for Gibson City for a few days visit with Mrs. PRUETT’s parents. Lt. PRUETT is enroute from Norfolk to Alma, Mich. where he will be stationed.

- Sgt. Dwight HANNA is here visiting with his father, Dr. HANNA and family.

- Mrs. Pauline WEST entered the Salem Memorial Hospital Sunday and on Monday submitted to an appendectomy.

- Kenneth E. JACKSON, A.R.M. 3 c graduated from Radio Ground School at Corpus Christi, Texas on Jan.1 with the highest score in the class.

- Word has been received of the death of Mr. Grover WOODS, a former resident of this city, which occurred in Chicago from pneumonia. Interment was made in Sandoval Cemetery.

- Omega: Glen SCHOOLEY of the U.S. Army is spending a 7 day furlough here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ray SCHOOLEY. He is stationed in Nebraska.

- Mrs. Bertha ROBB returned to her home in Decatur Thursday after visiting from Sunday with her sister, Mrs. Elizabeth ATKINS.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. Ruben CRAIN received a letter from their son, Gene, who is somewhere in the Pacific, that he is able to be out on duty after an accident of a broken arm and pelvic bone.

- Meacham: Word was received that Phil SHORT is stationed in England now.

- Meacham: Woodrow JOHNSTON was in a hospital having undergone an operation for the removal of a kidney.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. Ed HARRELL were in Salem Monday.

- Wilson School: S. Sgt. and Mrs. Victor MERCER of Olympia, Wash. arrived Thursday for a visit with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank KOLB, also his parents who reside near Salem.

- Wilson School: Our neighbor, Mrs. Art WHITE, died.

- S3 c Lyle SWIFT has returned to Great Lakes. He has completed his boot training and spent a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond SWIFT and sister, Miss Dorothy.

- Bert GARRETT is able to up around the house from his recent illness.

Jan. 27, 1944:

- Not to be outdone by the Navy, Pvt. George MEYER sends us a copy of the Christmas menu served the boys in Camp Chaffee, Ark. Here is the way it reads: Appetizers: Choice of Molotov Cocktail, hearts or grenades, and oysters on the half-track. Soups: Creme of Kiwi polish, and consomme foxhole. Entrees: Filet of Jap with TNT sauce, braised Nazis with rotten tomatoes, bad eggs any style, cooked goose ala Ribbentrop, boiled Gestapo sloppo en casserole, roast Norwegian quisling with applesauce and scrambled brains d’Hitler. Vegetables: Peas, armor piercing; G1 shoestring potatoes and beans, HE. Desserts: Tortoni Mussolini, Creme de Laval, Bazooka pudding, bombs-bombs, champagne (AWOL), topped off with fruits of victory.

- Here’s one from T-S Eldon COLCLASURE, who is doing radio work down in Florida. He says: I will write you again and tell you of my change of address. We arrived here Sunday 16th after 6 days and 6 nights on the trains. The trip had it’s good and bad points. The engineer was one of those fellows who was cut out to punch cattle. Three times a day and once a night he would test his breaks - breakfast, dinner, and supper. Then once at night was from 9:05 until we went to sleep. Florida is a beautiful state. McDill Field is a beautiful one. Just in case I forget, I would like to say a word about that deer, or rather to the fellows who saw it. When I used to go fishing or hunting alone, I saw many different kinds of animals rarely seen in those parts. But a camera might clear up the debate. If some of those fellows would take this advice I’ll be seeing a deer on the front page next Monday. So much for that. It’s getting near time now that I must sweep and scrub the aisle, so I had better close and get busy. Thanks a million for the paper. I enjoy it more than a few words can tell. I’ll furnish the address if you will furnish the paper. Mail is important. I don’t get too much. Incidentally if anyone would like to become a war correspondent I would like to hear from them. Keep up the good work Mr. VALLOW and luck to you through out the year.

- Here’s one from Bill BARBEE, S2 c, who is sailing the seven seas. He says: Just a few lines to thank you for the paper. I am getting it almost every week now and enjoy it very much, even the other boys read it and ask who is this and did you know them. They read the letters from some of the boys and laugh and say I wish I could write him a letter. I believe they would stop talking about being on maneuvers and how rugged is was. Maneuvers are just a small part of what most of them will probably go thru with before it is over, but let’s hope not. It is good to know what a soldier goes thru before he goes overseas. But as for sleeping on rocks. I believe they usually can find a smooth place to lay. My address has changed a little as you will see from the last one. I can’t write much as you would like to know, but maybe some day I can write more freely and give you the low down on things. Thanks again for the paper and tell everyone I said ‘hello’.

- Sarah Elizabeth WILKINSON SEE, daughter of Henry Clay and Harriett Ann WILKINSON, was born Sept. 5, 1861, and died at the home of her granddaughter, Mrs. Zelpha JONES on Jan. 21, 1944. She married Jolin Shull SEE on Oct. 10, 1883, who died on Sept. 12, 1923. They had 6 children: Paul, Mrs. Hazel MILLICAN, Edgar and John; 1 son, Oscar Clyde, and 1 daughter, Mary Eva, preceded their mother in death. She also leaves 18 grandchildren, 3 in the service: Ralph MILLICAN in England; Earl SEE in Pearl Harbor and See MILLICAN in Tennessee; and 17 great-grandchildren; 1 half-sister, Mrs. Margaret ALLEN of Parsons, Kansas, and 1 brother, W.T. WILKINSON, 85 years old, of Kinmundy. Early in life she became a member of the Methodist Church. She was injured by a fall a few weeks ago. She spent her entire life, 82 years, in Marion county and she and her husband lived and reared their family on a farm near Omega. Then in later years they moved to Kinmundy where she maintained a home. Services were held from the Methodist Church with interment in Evergreen Cemetery.

- Alfred LEMAY, in company with his brother, Bill and son, Don, of Hillsboro, and his sister, Mrs. Ada GARNER and son, Henry GOFORTH, of Centralia, were in Indianapolis Monday and Tuesday attending the funeral of their eldest brother, Elviton LEMAY, 68, who died on Sunday. The deceased was a resident here at one time.

- Kenneth D. SMITH, son of Mr. and Mrs. Otis SMITH left Tuesday night for Chicago, where he was inducted into the Navy.

- The fire siren was sounded Saturday afternoon when a small blaze was discovered on the roof of the building occupied by Mr. and Mrs. J.E. WILLIAMS. But due to the efficient fire department the blaze was quickly extinguished with very little damage done.

- Mr. and Mrs. C.B. ROHRBOUGH and daughter, Ruth, Mr. E. WORMLEY and daughter, Katherine, of Kinmundy, Mr. and Mrs. L.B. KING and Miss Ida WOOD of Champaign, and Ed BARENFINGER of Salem were Sunday dinner guests of L.C. ROHRBOUGH and Miss Helen in their home in Salem. The occasion was L.C.’s 81st birthday.

- Mr. and Mrs. Ira MARSHALL of Meadow Branch community, received word last Wednesday that their son, Virgil, who has been teaching mathematics and coaching basketball at Granite City High School, had received his commission as ensign in the Navy. He was sent to Florida Saturday, where he will have his preliminary work.

- Helena Maude LAMBERT JONES, daughter of Robert Leander and Katherine LAMBERT, was born April 19, 1882 at Lincoln, Ill., and died at her late home in Foster twp. on Jan. 9, 1944. On Dec. 20, 1906 she married William JONES, and they had 2 sons. In 1907 she was converted at a revival and joined the church at Zion. Maude leaves her husband; 2 sons, Robert at home, and Russell of Wilmington, Ill.; 1 daughter-in-law, Mrs. Russell JONES; and 1 aunt, Mrs. Will BENDER of Odin. Services were held from the Zion Church with interment in Jones Cemetery

- Mrs. Ruben CRAIN of Meacham twp. received a letter this week from Lee SHORT somewhere in England telling her of the strange coincidence of meeting his brother, Phil, sometime in Jan. 1944. These 2 boys are the sons of Harry SHORT and always lived in Meacham twp. They have both been in the army for 3 years and this was their first meeting in over 2 years. Lee just recently went to England but Phil has been in North Africa and at one time was reported missing in action. These 2 brothers spent 18 hours together.

- Ellis JOHNSON, C & E.I. fireman, who suffered a broken leg in a train wreck a few weeks ago, left Monday night to enter a hospital in Chicago for x-ray treatments.

- Wilson School: Pvt. Ralph JENKINS of Texas and Shorty OLDEN spent Thursday evening at the KLEISS home.

- Wilson School: Several neighbors and friends planned a surprise party for Mrs. Fred KLEISS honoring her 57th birthday on Jan. 18. The evening was spent playing pinochle and in a social way. Cake and coffee were served by her daughters, Mildred and Helen. Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. Leo STOCK and family, Mr. and Mrs. Jess CHARLTON and family, Mr. and Mrs. Marion SHUFELDT and family, Miss Anna KOLB, Mr. and Mrs. Chester KLINE, Mr. and Mrs. Eura SHAFFER and family, Harold HAHN, Lester QUANDT, and Wallace PHILLIPS.

- Mrs. Helen LECKRONE and son, Garrett, of Indiana are here visiting Mr. and Mrs. O.E. GARRETT.

- Pleasant Grove: A test well is being drilled on the Clyde HIESTAND farm east of Brubaker.

- East Zion: Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT called Sunday afternoon at the Merle JONES and W.H. JONES homes.

- Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Walter WARREN visited Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher COLE in Kinmundy. They just received word that their son, Bennie, was stationed at the Great Lakes Training Station.

- Cpl. Herschel J. WILKINSON and wife of West Frankfort called on their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. W.T. WILKINSON, Sunday. He is in camp in Penn. and is home on a weekend visit with his wife and family, also to meet his brother, Lt. Chas. E. WILKINSON from California. Both boys will go overseas soon after returning to camp.

- Swift School: Mrs. Elsworth CHANDLER and daughter, Wanza, of the northern part of the state, spent Monday here with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT.

- Swift School: Frank JONES and wife spent Sunday with James JONES and helped James celebrate his birthday.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth ROBB and daughter, Judith Ann, spent Sunday evening in Kinmundy at the Bert GARRETT home.

- Swift School: Pvt. Harold CHANCE of Tenn. is spending furlough here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Seymour CHANCE and family.

- Meacham: Mrs. CRAIN received a letter from her son, Carl, and also one from Phil SHORT Monday. The boys are somewhere in England, and Phil and Lee SHORT, brothers, had met there.

- Meacham: Hugh LACEY and wife were home on furlough from Texas.

- Alma W.C.T.U.: The monthly meeting of the W.C.T.U. was held at Mrs. Claude RAINEY’s of Alma, Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 18th. The meeting was conducted by Vice President, Mrs. CLAYTOR. The afternoon was spent in making scuffies for the Marion County Red Cross. Those present were: Mrs. CLAYTOR, Mrs. Fern DOWNEY, Mrs. Delcie FORD, Mrs. Linnie POLANKA, Mrs. Lelia FORD, and hostess, Beth RAINEY. The February meeting will be held at RAINEY’s. Everyone invited. Reporter, Mrs. John FORD, Alma, Ill.

- East Meadow Branch: Alfred LEMAY received a message Saturday of the death of his brother, Elvaton LEMAY of Indianapolis, Ind. He left for the funeral with Clifton LEMAY, Mrs. Ada GARNER and son, Henry GOFORTH of Centralia, and Bill LEMAY and son, Don, of Hillsboro.

- East Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Dale HAMMER and son of Sumner called on her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.F. ROBB Sunday. Mrs. ROBB accompanied them home for a visit.

- East Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Thurman GENTRY and daughter of Salem and Mrs. Dorothy GRAY and sons, Mrs. Clifton LEMAY and baby, spent Tuesday of last week with their mother, Jocie LEMAY and helped celebrate her birthday.

- East Meadow Branch: Mrs. Esta ROBB spent Friday in Alma with Mrs. Rada CALDWELL.

- Green Ridge: PFC Henry Williams is spending his furlough with his parents and relatives. He has a 22 day furlough.

- Green Ridge: Mrs. Nelda THOMAS has gone back to work at the dress factory after her vacation.

- S. Sgt. Rex GAMMON is spending the week here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles GAMMON.

- Mr. and Mrs. Jesse REESE spent the weekend in Alton with their daughter, Ruby, who is attending college there.

Feb. 3, 1944:

- From the way it looks the boys are just about to quit us. Anyway here are two this week. Here is a V-Mail from Pvt. Arthur MUEHLHAUSEN, who recently reached the shores of merry old England. Here is what he says: I want to take this opportunity to thank you for the paper. Since I have arrived on this side of the pond, I have received 2 issues of the paper. It was very welcome in the States and is even more so over here. I like to read the letters from the fellows in the service and get the home news. I read your Zatso article in the last issue I received and I hope by this time the hog situation has righted. We fellows in the army don’t want to go back to goat meat and if the farmers can’t afford to raise hogs that may come. I have never eaten any goat hash and don’t care to so here’s hoping the price is more profitable by now. Well I had better call a halt to this as space is scarce on V-mail forms. Thanking you again for the paper.

- Here’s one from Junior VANSCYOC, S2 c who was recently transferred to Oklahoma. Here is what he says: How are you all making down at dear old Kinmundy? I sure hope just fine. I am just about the same as ever couldn’t be better. Well I finally got away from Idaho and boy I sure am glad to get out of there. They sent me down to Norman, Okla. I really like it down here a lot better than I did in Farragut. We can run around here without our coats, and up there you would freeze with your coat on. I am going to set 16 weeks of schooling in aviation ordinance and if I make the grade I will get to take aerial gunnery then I will probably get transferred again. Well I will have to close for now.

- Mr. and Mrs. Chester KLINE have received word that their son, Charles, is now in England.

- Francis KOLB and Duane HANNA, seniors in our local high school were in Springfield last week where they were examined and inducted into the U.S. Naval Reserves, subject to call at the end of the school year.

- PFC Robert GRAY and Miss Margaret BARBEE were married on Jan. 29, 1944 at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Laverne GRAY in Alma. Miss Norma GARRETT was bridesmaid and Richard GRAY was bestman. Justice of the Peace, Jim GAMMON, performed the ceremony. Other attendants were Mrs. Lyle BARBEE, sister-in-law of the bride and Mrs. Jim GAMMON. PFC GRAY is home on a 10 day furlough from Camp Campbell and will return to camp Feb. 4. For the present, Mrs. GRAY will reside with the former’s parents. Mrs. GRAY is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Guy BARBEE of this city.

- We have received word from Ft. Banning, Ga., that Sgt. Daniel A. ARNOLD has been promoted to Staff Sergeant. He is serving in the Armored Infantry Battalion there. S. Sgt. ARNOLD is the son of Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD of this city. Congratulations, D.A.

- William Thomas PHILLIPS, a life long respected resident of our city died in his sleep Feb. 1 in the home of his son and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Bill PHILLIPS. Mr. PHILLIPS had not been well for several weeks and under a doctor’s care. Last fall, he celebrated his 89th birthday. He was preceded in death by his wife in 1935. Those surviving him are the following children: Bill PHILLIPS of Kinmundy; Mrs. Blanche KENNEDY of Alma; Mrs. Myrtle BUSHONG of Centralia; 1 granddaughter, Mary Margaret KENNEDY; an aged sister, Mrs. Adelia MARLOW of Omega; and a brother, Scott, of Bloomington. Services were held at the Linton Funeral Home with interment in Evergreen Cemetery.

- Mrs. Mary EAGAN HANSON has received word from her husband in Missouri stating he has been promoted from Private to Corporal.

- Mrs. Bob GREEN of North Fork community, had a narrow escape one day last week while canning meat. She had placed glass cans packed full of meat with tight lids on the cans into the oven. After a period of time she heard a loud explosion, on reaching the kitchen she found meat all over the room oven to the ceiling, the oven door had been blown open and meat, glass and grease was everywhere. She is a very lucky woman, no doubt if she or anyone had been in the room at the time of the explosion, they would have been severally burned.

- Ray HARGRAVE, of Centralia, formerly of here, took over the duties of the Clerk of the Selective Service board Feb. 1. He has been a salesman for Northwestern Steel and Wire Co. for several years and is a World War I veteran.

- Mrs. Wayne E. JONES and little son, Bobby, departed this week for Connecticut to join Capt. JONES, who is stationed there as an instructor.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT and daughter, Donna Mae, spent Thursday evening at the Billie MORRIS home.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT, Virgil LIVESAY and wife, and Mr. and Mrs. R.H. GREEN spent Sunday afternoon with Frank JONES and wife.

- Swift School: Ren WAINSCOTT and wife spent Friday in Effingham.

- Swift School: Kenneth ROBB and family spent Sunday with Mack ROBB and wife.

- Swift School: Clyde BASSETT and family spent Sunday afternoon with Selby GARRETT and wife and Mrs. Paul CALDWELL.

- Pleasant Grove: PFC See MILLICAN and wife spent a few days last week with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. WANTLAND helping to care for her mother.

- Campground: Mrs. George LYONS broke her shoulder when a horse she was driving started to run. Mrs. LYONS had started to get out of the buggy and was between the wheels when the horse started.

- Green Ridge: Miss Jean WILLIAMS came down from Chicago and was operated on at Vandalia Friday for appendicitis.

Feb. 10, 1944:

- Here’s another dandy letter from Major John A. BROOM, Jr. who has moved from North Africa into Italy. Just as a souvenir, he sent us a piece of Italian money, which he says is worth 1 cent in our money. Here is what he says: Since writing to you last time many things have taken place. I’ve spent 4 weeks in a Northern African Army Hospital with jaundice, moved to my new address "Somewhere in Italy" changed assignments, and have met new and interesting people. My last letter told you something about the Army Medical Service over here and at that time I had no idea of becoming a patient of such an institution so soon. My first few days in the hospital were some what uncomfortable - no appetite whatsoever; being stuck in the arms and fingers every so often for blood samples; no taste for cigarettes or my pipe; taking an unnecessary amount of foul tasting medicines; listening to the other patients talk about the swell food they were having in the dining hall (I was on a soft diet and couldn’t bear the sight of it); taking an afternoon nap then being forced to go to sleep at 9 o’clock in the evening. After the first week, however, I regained my appetite and was permitted to eat in the officer’s mess. I was hungry all the time. Immediately I started gaining weight. While "resting" in the hospital, and that’s a true story, I learned to play chess - my first exposure to that game which before I had considered ‘sissy’ and played only by wealthy old men - but with hours to wile away we thought nothing of spending 2 or 3 hours on one game. No, none of us were particularly good. I lost my knights and queen with disgusting regularity, though I did manage to defeat the Ward Champion, an English Lieutenant, one time. In addition to playing chess all of the patients spent a great deal of time reading books and magazines furnished by the American Red Cross. We had recent issues of Time, Newsweek, Life, Collier’s Saturday Evening Post, and others. Such books as "Oliver Wiswell", "30 Seconds Over Toyko", "So little time", "Assignment in Brittany, mystery novels and many others were available to us. Right here I would like to say a good word for the American Red Cross. They are doing a most commendable job over here in operating enlisted men’s clubs, Red Cross Officer’s Clubs and other important services. Many times the only decent place for a man to go for a snack, to write letters, or just plain loafing, is the Red Cross Club. At these clubs they have good eats, recreation rooms, writing rooms and lounge rooms. Field service units make rounds to various organizations serving hot coffee and doughnuts. So far in my experience overseas I have heard criticism only a very few times of the Red Cross, but most always one can hear words of praise for their work. This old world is a small place and seems to get smaller and smaller every day. It seems to me the farther I get away from home the more people I meet who are from parts of the country known to me or are former acquaintances or friends. As you probably know, I lived in Columbia, S.C. for sometime and probably know more people intimately there than in any other part of the States. About 2 months ago, I saw a little negro boy (small man I should say) in Navy fatigue uniform. On his left rear pocket he had the name "Dreher" stenciled in white letters. While living in Columbia, I knew several families by the name of "Dreher". I approached this fellow and said "Boy, where are you from?" (The conversation went something like this.) "Ise frum South Carolina, suh". "From Columbia?", I asked. "No suh, not xactly. Ise frum what dey calls West Columbia." "What part of West Columbia?" "Ise frum what dey calls Sugahtown, suh", he drawled. "Oh yes, right over there in the lane by Cayse school?" I asked. "Yassuh." "Does your Dad work at the brickyard (Guignard Brick Works)?" "Yassuh." "Do you know Mr. ALBERT and Mr. George HOUGH?" "Y-a-s S-U-H. Suh, is you all frum Columbia?" he questioned. "Yes, I am from Columbia and I know your old man", replied. When I started to leave him he extended his hand in real friendship and says, "Majuh, Suh, I hopes we meet again soon, and I hopes dats in Columbia." He then saluted and walked away. I am telling you this because this is a typical conversation between 2 fellows overseas, regardless of color. If they know someone mutually, or are familiar with the same part of the country. It’s really and truly a grand reunion. My Illinois acquaintances don’t seem to show up over here, as I haven’t seen a soul from near Marion county except my former Executive Officer, Michael J. KING, who was formerly in the oil business during the oil boom. (He’s from Mt. Vernon.) Censorship regulations prevent me from writing anything in detail about this country, perhaps I’ll be able to do so at a later date. Afterall there is a war being fought over here. I’m sure I can say a few things about it, however. Geographically it is a beautiful country, with mountains (some snowcapped), vegetable gardens, citrus fruits, apples, etc. The general means of transportation for the natives are mule, burro, horse, oxen, or human drawn 2-wheeled carts. There are some enormous cats with wheels about 6 or 8 feet in diameter. These carts are not what we would call factory made, but are hewn by hand from raw timber in shops such as a blacksmith shop in the States. Driving a vehicle on the highways is a most difficult task due to the fact that there are so many of these carts on the road. In addition to this hazard there are always many people walking on the roads. Have you ever been down South and seen a negro carrying a watermelon on his head? I’ve seen that many times and have always marveled at the balance they had, but I think these Italian people have them beat on that score. They carry tremendous loads on their heads, and much of the time the bearer may be barefooted, at the best have a pair of wooden sole shoes with a strap over the top - much the same as a shower shoe. Really, I’ve seen children and some grownups as well walking in cold mud or water on the streets or highways barefooted when the temperature was below freezing. It’s pitiful, especially to see poor innocent children going through such privation. We, of the good old United States, do not know or realize what it means to be poor, nor do we know what it means to have a real war come to our country to tear down our home and our places of business. We can be so thankful and deeply grateful for this. The end of this war will mean much to every civilized person in the world, so we must end it soon. We want to get home to our families, and, no doubt, the people of the invaded countries want to settle down to business again. I’d better leave such talk to the News Correspondents, don’t you think? I received the carton of cigarettes from the Chamber of Commerce and want to thank them for the remembrance. Also, to all the people who have so kindly and thoughtfully remembered me with greetings, I wish to thank them. Your thoughts of us, your prayers for our safe return are always requested and graciously received. S’long until next time.

- Here’s a letter from Cadet Ted LACEY, a marine who is in O.C.S. in Florida. Here is what he says: Just a few lines. Received the paper and seemed like old times to read it again. I am now in the Army Transportation Corps. I took a course in Engineering at Sheepshead Bay, N.Y., and was selected to come to the A.T.C. Officers School here at St. "Pete". I like it fine. We stay at the Colonial Hotel. Everything was on the honor system - no M.P.’s and etc., until a few of us got in the local ‘Bastille’. Now it is regular routine. We are trained here in the handling of Diesel powered craft up to 160 feet long, which includes interland cargo boats, crash boats, and invasion craft. I finish here Feb. 5, go to New Orleans, La., Feb. 7, am in line for an Army commission when I get there. Then we report to the Port of Embarkation. Then when or where, I don’t know. The weather here is really swell and have enjoyed every minute of the time I have been in training here. Have had a lot of fun and intend to have more. When the war is over I intend to use my experience as a means of shipping out and go around the world. So will be dropping you a line from afar away port before long. Well will have to sign off. Will be seeing you.

- Mrs. Arminda BROWN fell in her home Friday morning and suffered a broken hip, and was rushed to the Salem Hospital.

- William Thomas PHILLIPS, son of William and Hester Ann PHILLIPS, was born in Marion Co. on Oct. 13, 1854, at Omega, Ill. He was of the family of 11 children, and was the 3rd child. The only surviving of this family is 1 sister, Adelia MARLOW of Omega, and a brother, Scott PHILLIPS of Bloomington, Ill. He was married to Mary Etta PYLES on Aug. 25, 1877 at Salem. They had 3 children: William PHILLIPS Jr. of Kinmundy, Myrtle BUSHONG of Centralia, and Blanche KENNEDY of Alma, who survive him. His wife died Sept. 11, 1935. At an early age he joined the Presbyterian Church at Omega, later moving his membership to the Kinmundy Church. Besides his son and 2 daughters, he leaves 1 granddaughter, Mary Margaret KENNEDY, 1 daughter-in-law, Cora PHILLIPS, 2 sons-in-law, Lewis BUSHONG and James KENNEDY. He died Feb. 1, 1944, and services were held at Linton Funeral Home with interment in Evergreen Cemetery.

- Pvt. Thomas BOONE of Michigan is here and in Vandalia, Ill. for this week visiting his wife and parents.

- Mrs. D.F. NEATHERY has sold her store building, formerly known as the W.W. NEIL Building, to Mr. Jesse GEORGE, who will move his store therein in the near future. Mr. GEORGE also purchased some of the fixtures such as the meat counter scales, etc. belonging to Mrs. NEATHERY.

- In Memoriam of our dear son and brother, Billy DODSON, who died Feb. 11, 1941. Mr. and Mrs. Chas. DODSON and daughters.

- Swift School: Selby GARRETT and wife of Alma were Sunday dinner guests at the Frank GARRETT home.

- Swift School: Wess ROBB and wife were Sunday dinner guests at the Virgil LIVESAY home.

- Swift School: Clyde BASSETT and family, Darrell Gene LIVESAY, Frank GARRETT and wife and daughter, Donna, Mrs. Billie MORRIS and son, Jackie, Claude HANNA and family, Paul SWIFT and family, and Dorothy SWIFT were callers in Salem Saturday.

- Omega: Carl MILLICAN of the U.S. Army is spending a week’s furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ben MILLICAN.

- Meacham: Mrs. Dora HEICHER and son called on Mr. and Mrs. Edwin HARRELL Sunday afternoon.

- East Meadow Branch: Ann SLOVICK, S 1 c, U.S.N.R., spent the weekend here with her mother, Mrs. Mary SLOVICK and friends. Seaman SLOVICK has been in the U.S. Naval Hospital at Great Lakes since Thanksgiving with an infected eye.

- Wilson School: Last Wednesday, friends gathered at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jess CHARLTON honoring Mrs. CHARLTON’s 31st birthday. The evening was spent playing pinochle. Those present were: Marion SHUFELDT and family, Eura SHAFFER and family, Leo STOCK and family, and Mildred and Helen KLEISS.

- Meadow Branch: Mrs. KILE who was living in Alabama died. She was a former resident of this neighborhood.

- East Zion: Amos HAKE from the Navy in Idaho is spending furlough here with his wife and son.

- Miletus: A baby boy was born at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Clark HAMPSTEN on Feb. 4 named Donald Lee. Sunday visitors were the grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Irvin HAMPSTEN, Mr. and Mrs. Grover JOHNSTON, Glen and Vera HAMPSTEN, and Mrs. Virgil HAMPSTEN.

Feb. 17, 1944:

- Here’s a letter from Lt. Roy DOOLEN, who is now seeing the sights through the fog of merry old England. He says: Years ago I would never have dreamed that The Kinmundy Express would have world wide distribution. But it has just that. Mine is getting over here at varied intervals. I never know which week’s paper to expect next. However, I enjoy them immensely and wish to express my appreciation for it. Even though the news is a month and a half old, it doesn’t seem that way to me. I can keep up with the hometown’s progress week by week. For the past couple of months I have been roaming around the little island called England. The whole country has basically the same typography, which is small rolling hills covered with grass or small grain. There are few trees in most parts. The fields are in 5 to 10 acre plots with a hedge fence. It is very pretty when the sun is shining. From above it looks like a pretty patchwork quilt. The people are as friendly as one could expect, when there are so many soldiers around. When you read about blackouts and fogs, they are not exaggerating a bit. I certainly never saw anything so dark as it can get here. Last week was notable for 2 things: I got my laundry back, which is a rarity over here; and the sun shone 1 day, an even greater rarity. At present I am going to school, a never ending process in the army. In another week I will be through and go back to living in the field again. I have no idea where my outfit is at present but will be able to contact them through our base camp. Then I will take my map in hand, catch up with the outfit and go back to my duties as Motor and Executive Officer of my troop. Well this is enough for the present. Keep the paper coming and thanks a lot.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Leland ALDERSON, who is stationed in New Mexico. He says: On my recent delayed route, I had the opportunity to be home. That is what all the men in the service enjoy most. I also tried to see you, my chief reason being to thank you for sending the Kinmundy Express. But the editor of a paper whether in the movies or in Kinmundy is a hard man to find, so on more than one attempt I failed. Since I am writing I would like to tell you something of the type of training that the Army offers. We all like to know what is ahead for us, so for the boys yet to be inducted maybe I can ease your minds a bit. I went through what I now realize was a very efficient Basic Training schedule as compared with the training some or most of the boys here have received. At the time it was plenty rough and rugged. Even the words Jefferson Barracks brings a moan from most G.I.’s. Our first 2 weeks were spent in P.T. (physical training) close order drill, to the right flank, to the left flank, to rear march until you became so weary you wished the drill sergeant would pass out instead of you. But it was new and we all tried hard. The next couple of weeks we began to get lectures, map reading, extended order drill, tent pitching, sanitation, and rolling a pack. Each day at 5 o’clock the day started for us and we witnessed great difficulty attempting to crawl from our warm beds into the cold air that the tent had let sneak in all night. We had a small stove in each tent but as a rule it was out before morning and the fire pail had a little ice on it. By this time we were ready for the use of the piece or rifle manual of arms and day firing. Then came the day to fire for record. The day we left with full pack and carbine, was about 5 below zero, and a 2 mile march to Moss Hollow. We fired both Thompson Sub Machine gun and carbine. I surprised even myself with a score of 173 firing with our gloves on the temperature that morning being even colder than the day we left. On the third day we returned to J.B. Then came the parades before the Colonel, soldiers and more soldiers. The next phase of our training was the most interesting, camouflage. Our first instruction was "Without Camouflage a soldier’s piece is of no value for he never will get the chance to use it". We were demonstrated special painted uniforms, also those the boys made from torn sacks. They really worked but one would have to see the actual results to appreciate it. Then we all assembled around a quiet little farm and farmyard. The farmer was chopping wood, his wife feeding the chickens then over the loud speaker came the roar of a plane, an enemy plane, the farmer and his wife turned into 2 Sergeants. The farmer hopped onto the woodpile and was instantly at the trigger of a 50 caliber machine gun everyone ducked. The wife was flying across the chicken yard into the chicken house. The whole chicken house flew apart and an anti aircraft gun immediately was screaming out terrific blast. Out of a haystack located in the farmyard, came a speeding jeep loaded with G.I.’s firing a mounted machine gun, the whole farmyard bursting into the unexpected yet so very practical. Then came our bivouac actually practicing extended order and scouting. Also a few battles with blanks. The last was the gas chamber and incendiary bombs. Gas I think speaks for itself, no way to fight back, you only protect yourself as rapidly as possible the best way you can. Incendiary bombs tons of them and each developing 4,300 degrees Fahrenheit of heat when they go off are being dropped daily by the Allies. Steel melts at about 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit. That may give one a comparative imagination of the damaging power they possess. We then went before the Colonel for inspection and questioning. Receiving a passing rating, we then turned casuals. Some for a very short time because they were listed for shipment and hence moved out before the others (I was one). It is time for lights out so thanks again for the paper.

- Here’s a nice V-Mail letter from Pvt. Earl BRIMBERRY, who is wandering around in New Guinea. He says: Today I received my first 2 copies of your paper since I have been overseas. It gave me the same feeling as I had the night we sailed into harbor after so many days in a sardine can. I read Tuffy’s letter and I wholly agree with him on the New Guinea issue. I can’t say much about what we’re doing, but I guess you know more about that than I do, as your paper was the first I’ve seen in 2 months. Thanks a million and keep up the good work.

- Here’s one from PFC Lewis SPURLIN, son of Mr. and Mrs. Truman SPURLIN, of Vandalia, but formerly of this city. He is a so-called Leatherneck in the Marines and is now in the South Pacific. He says: Even though I am thousands of miles from the little town of Kinmundy, I will always have a warm spot in my heart for the people and the town. I think it is only natural because I spent the first 11 or 12 years of my life there. Since I last saw Kinmundy, I have had many experiences and saw many sights on my voyage from the States and in the combat areas. I guess the reason for writing this letter, is to tell you how much I enjoy reading the little hometown paper. It cheers me up to read about what the people are doing back there. I also want to thank the Chamber of Commerce for remembering us over here, by a carton of cigarettes. I don’t smoke myself, but I have them to one of my buddies who sure did appreciate them. We participated in the landings in the Empress Augusta Bay area on Bougainville and engaged the enemy in combat. As for myself, I didn’t find the life too boring because there is always some excitement or work to be done. Our first day in action we encountered numerous Jap snipers; but they were promptly taken care of and put in their places (6 feet under). An exciting experiences occurred to me one morning about 6 o’clock while I was lying asleep in my jungle hammock (which was buried in the fox hole supported on two logs.) I was awakened by something shaking my hammock and when I raised up to see who it was, it shook me more violently. I immediately fell out of it to see what the score was. I crawled to the entrance of my fox hole and here before my eyes the whole jungle was swaying back and forth and the whole earth rolled. As soon as I got out of my hammock I realized it was an earthquake; because I had felt them before, while I was in California. I could write more about the experiences, but the censor is probably pulling his hair out and sharpening his scissors by now. We received most of our Christmas packages the middle of this month and believe me there sure was a bunch of happy Marines. The big attraction for the boys down here is mail call. Perhaps I have written too much; but I just want to let you know everything is well in hand down here and I hope conditions there are the same.

- Here’s one from Norman BOWMAN, APC, who is aboard the ship U.S.S. LeJeune. Norman will be remembered by several although he has been away from here for quite some time. He says: This is to inform you of change in address and to thank you for your kindness in sending the Kinmundy Express to us fellows in the armed forces. I have been receiving your paper for quite some time now, and though there are very few people living in Kinmundy I know - not having lived there since 1919 when I was about 9 years old - I nevertheless appreciate and enjoy receiving your paper. It is especially interesting to note the large and ever increasing number in the services from Kinmundy. It seems that Kinmundy is doing its share in this war with 290 members in the armed forces.

- According to the list received from the Selective Service Board, the following Kinmundy boys have been inducted into the Army and Navy and will soon leave for camp along with 54 other men from the Salem area. Leo Marion JOHNSON, William Sherman JEANS, James Junior TATE, Forrest Eugene BURKETT, Charles PERGL, Walter Earnest McHATTON, Melvin GEILER, and Roy Edward MILLER.

- Mr. and Mrs. James O. EAGAN have a son born Sunday in the Salem Hospital.

- We have received word that Charles Wm. YOUNG has been promoted to Captain. Capt. YOUNG is in the Medical Corps and is now ready for overseas duty with the 41st Field Hospital.

- Word was received here recently by Mr. and Mrs. Arthur HOEHNE, that their son-in-law, Pvt. Orval T. GORDON, has been promoted to PFC.

- Aviation Cadet Walter W. WILLIAMS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy WILLIAMS, residing southwest of this city, has completed the Army’s Primary Flight Training Course at Thunderbird Field No. 1 in Arizona.

- Vernon STOCKER and Miss Martha BRASEL, both of this city, stole the march on their many friends Saturday and were married at the Methodist parsonage. They were accompanied by the bride’s twin, Miss Mary BRASEL and Cliff OLDEN. The bride is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed BRASEL and is a graduate of K.H.S. with the class of ‘34. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John STOCKER of this city, and is at present employed for Geo. CLEMENTZ. They will make their home in the Merta Rotan Apartment.

- Mr. and Mrs. Elroy A. SNELLING of Chicago, celebrated their 61st wedding anniversary Feb. 13 with 25 guests in attendance. Mr. SNELLING moved to Kinmundy from Nashu, N.H. in 1858, and lived in this city and township for 53 years, and in California, Indiana, and in Chicago for 33 years. He was married, Jennie HALLETT at Princeton, Ind. on Feb. 13, 1883. They are the parents of 2 sons: H.M. SNELLING, whom they have made their home for the past 21 years; and L.A. SNELLING of Sheboygan, Wis. They have a grandson, Lt. Elroy A. SNELLING, now stationed at Corpus Christi, Texas, as Asst. Supt. of Training Center and a granddaughter, Mrs. Genevieve LINDSAY of Sheboygan Falls, Wis. The great-grandchildren are William and Shirley LINDSAY of Sheboygan Falls and David Elroy SNELLING of Corpus Christi, Texas. Mrs. SNELLING was born in Charleston, Ill. on June 22, 1865.

- Dr. H.L. HANNA of this city was invited to cast his hat in the ring for the Republican nomination for Coroner of Marion county, and he has accepted the invitation. Bob HANCOCK of Salem will be the Doctor’s opponent in the general election this fall. Regarding this, the doctor said "I have a race horse that beats a horse owned by HANCOCK every time we match them. And if my horse can beat his horse, I see no reason why I can’t beat him in the election this fall."

- Mr. and Mrs. Manuel WELSH, Sr. have bough a home in Mt. Vernon and will moved there in the near future. They have been living in the Fannie LOWE property for 2 years.

- Mrs. John RIDLEY arrived here Friday from South Dakota where she has been with her husband, Pvt. John RIDLEY, who is being transferred to Mississippi.

- S. Sgt. R.D. AUSTIN arrived last Thursday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. D.T. UNDERWOOD from a camp in New River, N.C. This is Sgt. AUSTIN’s first trip home since he joined the Marines 4 years ago. He made his home with the UNDERWOODs before going into the service. He is a nephew of Mrs. UNDERWOOD.

- Mrs. James DONOHO and son, Gene, spent the weekend in Chicago with Mr. DONOHO, A.S., who is in boot training at Great Lakes.

- Mr. and Mrs. Wm. PHILLIPS were Centralia callers Wednesday. Mr. PHILLIPS consulted a doctor regarding a badly infected eye which has been causing a lot of suffering.

- Sgt. Major Neil JOHNSON and a soldier friend of North Carolina, arrived here yesterday to spend the night with his mother and grandmother, Mrs. Paulene JOHNSON and Mrs. Nancy NEIL. They were enroute to St. Louis for official business.

- Miss Pearl ARNOLD of Springfield spent the weekend here with her mother, Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD and Miss Ruby.

- Meadow Branch: Pvt. Dwight ORGAN and wife spent Friday with his father, Henry ORGAN and Aunt Rose MARSHALL. He is being transferred from Kentucky to California and is enjoying furlough.

- Green Ridge: PFC Henry WILLIAMS left Wednesday for camp in Washington.

Feb. 24, 1944:

- Here’s another letter from Sgt. Raymond MOELLER who is still sojourning in Merry Old England. He says: Just a few lines to let you know at this time and I know that it will be very short as at the present time we have very little news to write about. I kinda like it here as yet, but I have been in a lot better places than this. I think that I have finally got to a more permanent station and I am sure glad of it. A person at least knows what the next days work will be. And that sure makes a one feel much better. I am sure that I can do it in a way that should help out quite a lot. My papers have not caught up with me as yet, so I will send my address and in that way I am sure to get it a lot sooner. Well, I am going to try and write more next time as at the present my mind is a perfect blank. Sure do hope that everyone is well around Kinmundy.

- Here’s a note from Pvt. James E. JENKINS who wished his address changed to Texas. He says: Just a line to let you know I receive the paper each week. So in return I will send you a copy of our paper in exchange. I think the letters from the boys are very good and also gives us an idea where they are. I have had 6 different changes of address, so I hope I get stationed and stay so it won’t be so hard for you to know where I am. I notice there are 292 in the service. It sure would be nice to see all those boys back in the town and neighboring towns again, and from the looks of the many different prisoners it will. Well I will close and thank you and the ones in the office for the Express.

- Here’s one from PFC Harold SIMMONS, who is seeing the sights of Iran, a place where most preachers would give their right leg to visit, but from the way Harold talks, he would probably be willing to give his right leg to get out of it. He says: I have been trying to find time to write and thank you for the paper, but just never got around to it. You don’t know or can’t even imagine how glad I am to receive the paper and I think all the boys in the service are just like me. It seems as if mail from home is about all a person has to look forward to. It doesn’t come very regular over here but that makes me appreciate it even more. I don’t know very much to tell you about this country except it would be a good one to get out of. When I first reached this country, everything was new and strange to me and I noticed all of the things that were different from our own, but now I am getting rather used to them and don’t notice them so much. The people in this country are very backward as a rule although some of them are being pretty well educated. Most of the educated people being very rich. A lot of the people are being hired by the U.S. government as laborers under the supervision of the army. You’ve read and seen pictures of old Biblical stories. Most of these people dress and look exactly as they did. You can see some of the tombs that were built many years ago. I have seen Daniel’s tomb, you have read about him, I know. The one railroad which is operated exactly like the one the Major BROOM described. I could go on for hours, but I think I can tell it better than I can write it. Here’s hoping I get to tell you all about it soon.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Earl SCHWABE, who wants his address changed, as he is maneuvering around in Louisiana. He says: I am dropping you a few lines to let you know my new address. I am now on maneuvers in Louisiana and I mean we have some ice here which I didn’t see in Florida. We are going to be here for 3 months or longer. This is a real small field, but a good clean one. We are only a few miles from the Texas line. Well, I am still a private, but maybe my rating will come through some time, sure hope so anyway. Thanks again for the paper. It is really swell of you to send it and I want you to know I really appreciate it. So long for now as I have to go on guard. I hope Guin is still in the States.

- The local fire department was called out to the SCOTT farm north of town Friday to help extinguish a roof fire on the house. But due to the rather muddy lane leading up to the house, the engine did not make it in time and the bucket brigade went into action and soon had the flames extinguished. Considerable damage was done to the roof. The house was occupied by the S.W. GENTRY family. The cause of the fire was a spark from the chimney.

- After the regular meeting of the Rosedale Rebekah Lodge Friday evening, a party was given honoring Martha BRASEL, the very efficient Warden of the lodge, who recently became the bride of Vernon STOCKER.

- Mr. and Mrs. A.J. JACKSON celebrated their little granddaughter, Charlotte HONN, 4th birthday Sunday by inviting Mr. and Mrs. Russell WILLIAMS and children to lunch. In the morning, the little honoree attended Sunday School and placed her 4 pennies in the birthday offering. Mrs. HONN and 2 children of Champaign arrived in Kinmundy Saturday morning.

- Pvt. Darrell REESE and wife of North Carolina are visiting with relatives.

- Pvt. Erven E. LEAT left last Saturday for his camp in Texas after spending a furlough here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Paul ARNOLD, of the Arnold Chapel neighborhood, and with his sister, Mrs. Reindl BAYLIS of this city. A party was given in the Arnold’s Chapel School on Tuesday evening of last week in his honor.

- We have received word that Benny DOOLEN, AM3 c, has been promoted to Aviation Metalsmith 2 c. He is stationed at Atlanta.

- We have received word that T 5 Eldon COLCLASURE was promoted to Sergeant last week. He is stationed in Florida.

- PFC James GREEN of Arkansas arrived Tuesday morning to spend a week here with his family.

- Mr. and Mrs. Otis SMITH and daughter, Doris, moved Sunday from the ROBNETT property near the mill to Decatur where Mr. SMITH has employment. The SMITHs have 2 sons in the service.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. F.S. HARRIS called on Mrs. Edwin HARRELL Wednesday afternoon.

- Meadow Branch: Word has been received that Leo JOHNSON has been inducted into the Army. He is the 29th boy who attended school in this district to be taken into the army. Otis HINES was the only one from here to serve in World War I.

- Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Ira MARSHALL had word from their son, Pvt. Robert G. MARSHALL that he was being transferred from Charleston, Ore. to Ft. Ord, Cal. All the M.P.’s along the Oregon coast were gathered at Portland and shipped to Ft. Ord for extensive training.

- Swift School: Phyllis MIDDLETON gave a Valentine Party for her pupils and their parents at the school house last Monday evening. Games were played and Valentines exchanged. Phyllis served punch and cake. Cleve DOOLEN and wife were guests.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT and daughter, Donna Mae, spent Wednesday evening in Patoka at the Roy JONES home.

- Swift School: Mrs. Fred GAMMON spent Saturday night and Sunday with her parents, Virgil LIVESAY and family.

- Mrs. Fred GAMMON moved their furniture from the V.V. BARCROFT property into the Chas. GAMMON home where she will reside for the duration or at least while Fred is away.

- Mrs. Elizabeth ATKINS expects to soon move into the Fina GARRETT house near the Christian Church. Mrs. ATKINS has been living in the John GARNER property just east of the city park.

March 2, 1944:

- It sorta looks like the boys are slipping when it comes to writing letters to us. Just 1 received this week and it was from PFC Thomas GORDON, better known as Junior, who has been spending the winter down in Texas. He says: Have been aiming to write for sometime but seem to always put it off until another day. I wrote you sometime ago and thanked you for the paper, but will take this opportunity to thank you again. Both my wife and I enjoy reading about what is going on back home. I also enjoy reading the letters from the other boys in the service who are stationed at various places. All but my first 7 days in the army have been spent in Texas. The winters are exceptionally mild which makes it a nice place to be stationed. At present the orange and grapefruit trees are blooming and the weather is very nice. One can really enjoy it too when you read the letters from home about the zero weather and snow. My wife has been here with me all winter and she likes the mild winter weather a lot. This is an ideal training center for the weather is suitable for flying the year around. For the past 15 months I have been stationed here as one of the maintenance personnel of the training division. I have seen a good many students come and go from here and I have never seen anyone from the home town except Richard JONES, a cousin of mine, who was stationed here until he left for Cadet training. But a couple of weeks ago Maxey SPENCER went through chow line while I was doing my 3 day hitch of K.P. I talked with him a short while but I hope to see him from time to time while he is here. I must sign off for now hoping this finds things back at Kinmundy as well as could be expected. I want to thank you again for the paper and say hello to all my friends back home.

- A little bird told us about another boy making good and the said boy is none other than Bill COLE. Bill is employed in the Ship Yards in Evansville, Ind. and is one of the 528 welders employed there. On last Monday morning a bulletin board published the names of those doing the most satisfactory work, and Bill’s name was first for those on this boat and 7th in the whole shipyard. Again we say if you want a job well done, get someone from Kinmundy to do it.

- Mr. and Mrs. Emery WRIGHT of Alma are very happy over their 2 sons, Dale and Kenneth, meeting in England. The boys had wanted to see each other and had tried to get in touch with one another for sometime before they succeeded in doing so. They were together for 7 days. Dale and Kenneth wrote back and said they were both speechless due to the fact that they hadn’t seen each other for 18 months. After they did get to talking, they talked about home, each other, everything and everybody. They are going to try and meet again the first of next month. Kenneth wrote home and said that it was a little family reunion with the exception of 5 but thought that they would be togther again soon. Dale had received a letter from Art BOYD of Kinmundy so they are going to see each other as soon as possible. Art is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Mel BOYD of this city.

- Mr. and Mrs. Orie ATKINS announce the marriage of their daughter, Miss Laura Mildred ATKINS to Pvt. Manuel Ralph WELSH, son of Mr. and Mrs. G.M. WELSH of Mt. Vernon. The ceremony was performed in Mineral Wells, Texas on Feb. 19. Mrs. J.L. ALEXANDER of Chicago attended the bride and Pvt. Richard ZIECLER of Evanston served as best man. Other attendants were Mrs. Edward WEBER of Milwaukee, Wis, Pvt. Edward SULLIVAN of Chicago, and Mrs. J.H. BURTON. A wedding party was given the newly weds at the Crazy Water Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas.

- A deal was closed Monday whereby Joe RENO became the owner of the city’s only barber shop. Mr. RENO has had the shop leased from Lyle WILLIAMS, who has been working in Chicago. Mr. WILLIAMS, who has been working in Chicago. Mr. WILLIAMS has been here the past week visiting with homefolks.

- Word has been received of the death of Bertha BUNDY COOPER in Phoenix, Ariz. which occurred on Feb. 20, 1944. She was the second daughter of the late S.L. and Minnie BUNDY, having spent her early childhood in Kinmundy and nearby neighborhoods. During World War I, she served her country as a nurse in France. At the close of the war she returned and was married to Jesse COOPER, who survives. A small son died several years ago. Bertha had been a semi-invalid for the past 5 years. Interment was at Phoenix where they have made their home for a number of years.

- Mr. and Mrs. W.H. MORGAN have received word that their son, Clyde Q. MORGAN, has been promoted to First Lieutenant. He is stationed in Florida.

- Mrs. Fred CRAIG received word of her sister, Eva’s death in the San Diego Hospital in California.

- The friends of L.L. HULTS, for many years a resident of this community, will be sorry to learn he is suffering from a fractured him, following a fall in the home of his daughter, Mrs. R.E. LOVELL, of Mateno, Ill., where he has made his home for a number of years.

- Mrs. Margaret GRAY received a cablegram last week from her son, Frederick, stating that he had arrived safely overseas.

- Pvt. Woodrow WILKINSON spent an 8 day furlough here recently with homefolks. Upon his return to camp, he was shipped out and is now on his way across.

- Capt. James MORGAN of Camp Grant is here for a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.H. MORGAN.

- Miletus (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Estel JAMISON are parents of a baby boy born Feb. 18.

- Miletus (from last week): Pvt. Woodrow WILKINSON left Thursday of last week for a camp in Maryland after spending a 7 day furlough here with his wife and parents.

- Pleasant Grove (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Oran ALDERSON and daughters, and Mr. and Mrs. Gene HELM and son spent Sunday with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. George LONNON. Dinner was served in honor of Mr. LONNON’s birthday which was the 22nd.

- Young School: Mr. and Mrs. Ellis WILKINSON received a letter from their son, Kenneth, who is in New Guinea. He was allowed to send home several pictures and told of 3 battles he had participated in, and said he was still alright.

- Pleasant Grove: Pvt. Paul SMITH of Kentucky spent a weekend furlough with Ralph HIESTAND and wife.

- Wilson School: M. Sgt. and Mrs. Paul TRAINOR and little daughter, Paula, of N.C. and Mr. and Mrs. Harley LITTLETON of Farina visited Thursday with Mr. and Mrs. Fred KLEISS and daughters.

- Green Ridge: The kitchen shower for Mr. and Mrs. Ruben McCURDY last Sunday was well attended.

- Green Ridge: Several from around here attended the kitchen shower for Mr. and Mrs. James (Bill) HEADLEY last Tuesday night.

- East Zion (from last week): Miss Helen DONOHO and Bill HEADLEY were married Saturday by Rev. WRIGHT of Alma.

- Mrs. D.F. NEATHERY attended the funeral of her sister-in-law, Mrs. Major LAMBORN in Vernon, Monday.

March 9, 1944:

- We have been told that our paper is being read by several of the boys in the service besides our immediate homefolks. And here is a letter from a lad we do not know, Cpl. DURER of California. He says: As a friend of Carl GREEN, I am writing to say that we enjoy reading your little paper, especially interesting do we find the letters of the men in the service. Though we have not been overseas, our work in the army has been very interesting and Carl intends to write a letter about it which he hopes you will publish. I wish that my home town had a paper similar to yours.

- Here’s a letter from Chaplain (Capt.) Cecil C. LOWE, who is now roaming around the state of Arkansas. He says: There are definite signs of approaching spring here in the Southern Ozarks. It arouses the half dormant zeal of a one time farmer to rush out at the first break of day to tear up the earth and begin spring seeding. These inclinations are soon satisfied by digging fox-holes and slit-trenches. If no excavating implements are to be had the helmet will serve the purpose. Ones ambitions for violent exercise can also be satisfied by the forced marches which some energetic officer conceives as being urgently needed to toughen-up both the officers and enlisted personnel. Bivouac conditions have led me to believe that Arkansas mud is just as slick, adhesive, and bottomless as anything that Illinois can produce. We had bivouacked in a rolling post-oak woodland that had served the purpose of concealment quite well, but on attempting to take our departure from the area our mess and supply trucks began to sink. A half track and 3 tanks which came to our aid soon pulled themselves under. We marched toward camp, but at nightfall, 2 of the tanks were still bogged down. On a recent bivouac we conducted Chapel services in an open space in the woods at the foot of a small knoll where my pulpit, which happened to be a large stump, was located. Stumps and logs which we carried in served as pews for the large and attentive congregation. As Jew, Catholic, Protestant, and Confucianism (our Chinese orderly), we worshiped God in the great Natural Amphitheater with the birds and squirrels as spectators and the canopy of heaven as a roof. Our Presbyterian songleader led the songs which our substitute (no preference religion) organist played on our field organ accompanied by our Jewish bugler, and the sermon was rendered by the Methodist Chaplin. One Jewish officer pitched his tent on a hillock by the Chaplain’s tent desiring, as he expressed it, "to be nearer to God". The Army proves to be a great training ground in Democratic principles and for lasting friendships. Here, as in civilian life, one finds the fellow that seems to fit in nowhere and also, the man that is able to fill any position. Even though certain other factors tend to neutralize their good, the work of the Social Service Organization and the Chaplaincy offers the Service Man the greatest morale, moral and spiritual opportunities that the Service Man has enjoyed under any previous war conditions. The Champlain was treated to a very pleasant surprise recently when he received notification from the War Department of his promotion to the rank of Captain. Having had no previous knowledge of such a recommendation, it came as something of a shock - yet, not too unpleasant a shock. Although feeling unworthy of the new rank, he desires to attain to the standard which the position merits. We desire to express our express our sincere appreciation for your thoughtfulness in providing us with news from our old home community. Kindly accept our thanks with the small inclosure to help speed "The Express" on it’s way to the remote parts of the earth.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Hugh LACEY, who has been lucky enough to spend the winter in California. He says: Just a few lines to let you know that my address has been changed again. I am back to my old base, but under a different squadron since I got back from Texas. It’s good to get back to a decent base and country. The sunshine here the past few days has been running down the gutters. Tonite it came down in the form of sleet. Since I got back they have me working on the alert crew. We take care of planes coming into this field - mostly servicing them once in awhile an engine change. I sure do look forward to getting the paper from home. I want to thank you for it and let you know we appreciate it.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Roy DAVIS, who spent his boyhood days in our community, but is now sojourning in the state of Texas. He says: It was good of you to include my name on the Home Town Service Roll and send me a paper each week. While I have been away from Kinmundy for several years, I have been able to keep in touch with affairs there through the Express, and appreciate it even more now than I am in the service. Kinmundy will always be my hometown no matter how far war or business takes me and it is always dear to my heart. I enjoyed Leland ALDERSON’s letter in last week’s paper about his basic training at Jefferson Barracks. It was particularly enjoyable because Leland and I went through Kinmundy Grade School together, and because my own basic training was very much the same as his. We had one advantage, however, being down here in Texas. The weather was and is good. Most of the time we don’t even need jackets on as it is so warm. Our barracks are heated by automatic gas heat, so we have no coal or dust to worry about. But our training is equally rugged. Fortunately I had only 6 weeks of regular basic training, and am now receiving my technical training in Clerk’s School. Our courses last 9 weeks and include Army Regulations, Table of Organization of the Army, Military Correspondence, and a study of the various forms used by the Army. It is really swell to be in school again. In my "spare" time, I manage to keep busy organizing a Sunday School in our Battalion. It is the only one I know of in Army Camps. As its president, I have had a splendid opportunity to work with the Chaplain and have developed attendance to gratifying proportions. I’m hoping to be permanently assigned to a Chaplain after my courses are over, so that I may spend my full time in the work of the Chapel. My best regards to the folks "back home".

- Here’s another letter from PFC Derrill STIPP, formerly of Alma, but now in Italy. He says: Well, I will write you a letter thanking you for the paper again and telling you or asking you to tell the boys I enjoy reading their letters. I sure do feel like I am home or close to home when I read one of them, as 22 months away from home will make a man have the blues and homesick too, and about 10 of them months sleeping on the ground and in a foxhole. That is where I am writing this letter. From what I hear there has been several of the boys left the States since I have. I sure will be glad when we can all come home again and sit down to a good meal once more. We have some pretty good food, but not like home. The Spam and hash and stew sure gets old. We do have some beef once in a while, but I guess it is a pretty hard job to feed all the men in the army. Will close hoping to get home soon.

- Here’s another letter from Paul PARRISH, S2 c, who is still sailing the seven seas on the U.S.S. Pelias. He says: Truly I am grateful that my ration of "Home Town Morale" in the form of the Kinmundy Express is arriving regularly. Your column entitled Zatso makes a fellow feel as though he was on the scene. To we who are so far away from home, those sketches of "Close to Home" life are priceless. We can’t say too much about our duty here, but when the time can be revealed, I am sure it shall bring the Nation’s "Well Done". The hospitality is good, but how true I am finding the words ‘Be it ever so humble, there’s no place like home.’ That is why the Kinmundy Express is so valuable to me for it is a life line between myself and the things at home I’ve come to treasure so since leaving them.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Charles DISS, who has also been lucky enough to spend most of the winter in California. He says: I wish to take this opportunity to express my thanks for the paper. It is certainly nice to set down and read the news from the old home town after a day out in the field. I have been intending to write ever since I got the first paper, but somehow or another they manage to keep us boys pretty busy during our basic training. I imagine some of the boys who took their basic here at Camp Roberts can verify my statement. So far I have seen very many places of interest and I imagine in the next few months I will have really seen some sights that will long be remembered. Oh yes, we have been having a great abundance of the so called ‘liquid sunshine’ they speak of so often. Especially the comedians on the radio. Even though it sounds funny when they talk about it, it is just about the truth. We get a nice heavy dew about every day. As for our trip out here, it was a very enjoyable one, especially for me, as I had hardly ever been out of Illinois. It took us 3 days and 3 nights to make the trip and of course we were all anxious as to where we were going and what branch of service we would be put in. Of course, there were rumors all the way out here but no one knew for sure. However, when we reached Los Angeles on a Sunday night we were assured we were going to Camp Roberts. Then we were worried as Camp Roberts was an Infantry and Artillery Replacement Training Center. But it all worked out pretty good. About half of the convoy were picked for the artillery and the others got the infantry, of which none seemed very pleased. I have enjoyed it all very much so far, of course, we all get pretty disgusted sometimes when we get K.P. or have to stand guard in the rain, but we just have to take it, as we know our boys over there would be tickled to death if that was all they had to worry about. Since this is an artillery Replacement Training Center, we are almost assured of a nice little boat ride before long. I had the opportunity to spend the weekend with a very nice family who lived in Kinmundy about 12 years ago, the Clyde PRESTON family. I know a lot of you folks there know them because they asked about a great number of you. Clyde is my Dad’s cousin, so of course, they knew all of my relation. His wife had the misfortune to lose her eyesight a few years ago and she certainly enjoyed talking about the old hometown. They have 3 sons serving in the Navy. One of which left just the day before I got there. They asked me to say ‘hello’ to all you folks for them. Again I want to thank you for the paper Norris. You are certainly doing a grand job by sending a paper to all the boys and girls and I know they all appreciate it as much as I do. So long for now and keep up the good work.

- James F. SECHLER was born in Cleveland, Ohio on Oct. 26, 1865 and died Feb. 29, 1944. He leaves his wife, Mary Julia SECHLER (nee PERKUHM) also 2 sisters, Mrs. Bertha WEBSTER of St. Louis, and Mrs. Mame BLOOM of White Plains, NY. Mr. SECHLER was formerly an employee of the Missouri Pacific Railroad Company for 31 years and has spent the last 12 years as a citizen of our community.

- Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. OSTERHOLTZ of Centralia have a baby boy born on Feb. 23 named Arthur Robert. The mother is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A.S. PARRISH of this city.

- Mrs. Lyle WILLIAMS is recovering at her home from a tonsillectomy performed last Thursday in St. Anthony’s Hospital in Effingham.

- A still born baby girl was born Tuesday in the Salem Hospital to Pvt. and Mrs. Donald MILLER named Tersa Fae. Donald is somewhere in England.

- Mr. and Mrs. Calvin LANE entertained the following of their children to a birthday dinner Wednesday honoring Mr. LANE on his 77th birthday: Mr. and Mrs. Lester VANSCYOC and family, Mr. and Mrs. Burdette SHAFFER and family, Mr. and Mrs. Earle LANE and family. The other son, Cecil and family were unable to attend due to sickness.

- Pvt. and Mrs. Manuel WELSH are visiting here for a few days while Manuel is enroute from Texas to Maryland.

- Mr. and Mrs. Ben JENKINS received word recently that their son, Ralph, had arrived safely in England.

- Wilson School: Mrs. Frank KOLB and children left Thursday for their new home in Peoria where Mr. KOLB has employment.

- Miletus: Jr. TATE and Eugene HARRELL of our community entered into the service of our country last week. Jr. is in the Army at Ft. Sheridan, and Eugene is in the Navy in N.Y. Herschel KRUTSINGER and George BUTTS go to Chicago Wednesday night for examination.

- Sgt. Eldon COLCLASURE of Florida is here for a visit with his wife and baby son.

- Mr. and Mrs. W.T. WILKINSON have received word from their grandson, Junior WILKINSON, that he landed safely in England. He reported a pleasant trip over and has met a friend from his hometown, West Frankfort, Ill.

- Miss Pearl ARNOLD of Springfield, Ill. and S. Sgt. D.A. ARNOLD of Georgia are here visiting with their mother, Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD and Ruby.

- Pvt. Junior GRAY of Alabama is enjoying furlough here with his wife and parents.

- East Zion: PFC Dresdon HEADLEY of San Diego, Cal. and wife arrived home Saturday to spend furlough with home folks. Mrs. HEADLEY will remain here.

- East Zion: Mr. and Mrs. James BASSETT and daughter, Mrs. Ruth WILLIAMS, spent Sunday at the Merle JONES home.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. Elmer NEAL took their son, Freddie, to Olney Hospital Saturday in the Linton Ambulance suffering with a bad appendix.

- Meadow Branch (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Robert FRYE spent Thursday and Friday with Mr. and Mrs. Walter WARREN. They went to Louisville to spend Saturday and Sunday with his parents, then Mr. FRYE reported to Great Lakes Training Station Wednesday for basic training.

- Pleasant Grove: Lt. and Mrs. John SHAFFER of Omaha, Neb. arrived Saturday to spend a 10 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Guy SHAFFER and other relatives.

- Several of the neighbors surprised Mr. and Mrs. Roy MILLER and children by calling Tuesday night. Refreshments of sandwiches, cookies and coffee were served. All departed at a late hour saying so-long to Mr. MILLER, who left Thursday to join the Armed Forces. Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. Clyde HIESTAND, Mr. and Mrs. Claude HIESTAND, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert ANDERSON and little daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Chris MEYER and daughters, Mr. and Mrs. Oran ALDERSON and daughters, and Mr. and Mrs. Pearl ROSE and son, and little granddaughter.

- Camp Ground: Guy PERRY had a bad spell with his heart again on Saturday.

- Pleasant Grove: Some from here attended the dedication services at Zion Thursday night. Then on Friday night, the Pleasant Grove members furnished the program which was also given at Zion.

March 16, 1944:

- Here’s a letter from Joseph LOVETT, S1 c, of the Coast Guards. He is located in Virginia and says: I believe it is about time that I wrote you a short note and thanked you for the paper. I receive it every week and it is certainly welcome. I like to read just what everyone is doing. Those papers are very good for morale and I hope you keep up the good work. I hear of the weather back home and wish I were there. The weather here in Virginia is nothing to brag about. We have had very mild weather the 2 years that I have spent here. It is very changeable though, almost twice as bad as Illinois. I would like to ask a personal favor of you. I would like to know where Kenneth FULFER is and his address if possible. I believe that if any man knows, that man will be you. I must sign off now and want to thank you again for sending me your paper.

- Here’s one from PFC Laverne KEEN, who is stationed up in Michigan. Here’s what Pete has to say: Guess it’s about time I had better write and thank you for the paper. I really enjoy it a lot and don’t know exactly how to thank you enough for it, but it is nice to know where all the fellows are and what’s going on around Kinmundy. It seems as if most of the boys are in England. I suppose they are getting plenty of tea and drink. Well, I have got 100 things to do and I can’t think of a one of them, but I’ll close thanking you again for the paper.

- Here’s one from Sgt. Sterling SULLIVAN, who has seen quite a bit of the old world and is now sojourning in Italy. He enclosed a copy of the famous "Stars and Stripes" which we scanned from cover to cover. He says: Sitting in my tent reading our old town paper. I find that the articles that appeal to me mostly, besides the actual news of home, are those written by my comrades in arms, stationed all over the world. I fully realize that these articles mean a great deal to the folks at home. It is with that thought in mind which urges me to relate some of my own experiences. You would be surprised to hear of the many countries in which I have received the Express. Believe me, there has been many an evening back in the dessert when my tent mates and I had nothing but this paper to read. Those were the trying days when Rommel and his infamous African Korps were knocking on the gates of Alexandria. In the past 16 months I’ve gone a long way thru Egypt, Lybia, Tunisia, Malta, Sicily, and finally here in Italy. It certainly has been interesting seeing all these famous cities like Suez, Cairo, Alexandria, Tripoli, and Tunis, just like having my history and geography lessons come to life. I’ve enclosed the Stars and Stripes in this letter for 2 reasons, one to give you a view of our Italy edition and second to proudly refer you to an article about my outfit - the famous 79th F.A. I could say a great deal about my outfit but then every solider’s own outfit is always the best. My claim is short and sweet I don’t believe there are many groups that can claim 5 stars to their campaign ribbon. However, the ribbon that I want most of all and hope to earn soon is that final "Victory Ribbon". I’d like to say a little about the job I do. I play nurse-maid to a fighter plane, otherwise known as crew chief. You would be surprised how one can get attached to a plane. Of course, without saying to the pilot, watching his take-off and then sweating out his return. If he is a few minutes late, you lose 10 years of your life worrying what has happened and then you spot him always and that thin smile creeps across your face and you are like a new man again, and so it goes day in and day out, always something new and exciting happening to help pass the time and so it will be until its all over. Again many thanks for the paper. I always look forward to receiving it.

- Here’s one from James HAMMER, SOM2 c, who is sailing the seven seas aboard the U.S.S. Heron. He says: Thought it was about time I wrote and thanked you again for the paper. Today I received my Jan. 6th issue of the paper, the first I have received for over 2 months, but I also got a letter dated July 4, so I suppose that the proceeding papers will finally catch up with me. Anyhow, I just don’t look at the date and this makes it news to me. Well, I hope someone doesn’t shoot that deer before I get back. I haven’t seen any wild deer so this would be something new to me. By the number of reports there must be more than one around, so maybe there will be quite a few before long, just like we used to read about in history books. I was glad to hear that George MILLER has been having a good time in London, and especially what he says about the fairer sex, as you call it, I think George would do alright any place as he always was a ladies man, I can truly say I sometimes envy his tactics, as I call it. I wish I could eat some of Paul’s chow. I could soon tell him if it lives up to the Navy standard or not. Probably if I did eat some of it, I would want to get transferred to his ship. I hope John JEZEK does not have to take too much mineral oil and hope Cecil can get home before long as I know how he feels. Well, Mr. VALLOW, I wish I could tell you where I am but that is out of the question, right now, so will have to leave this until later when I can sit on a bench some place and tell you the story of where I have been and what I have seen but for now I will have to close because the ship is pitching quite a bit and also I am out of things to say. Hoping this finds all in as good health as myself.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Ralph JENKINS. ‘Pug’ recently landed in merry old England and appears to like the country. He says: Thought I would drop you a few lines to let you know I am in England, and I’m hoping to get a paper soon. I haven’t got a paper now for almost a month and I certainly miss it. Well I suppose you would like to hear a little about the country of England. Well, the weather here is awful, it is damp, foggy, rainy, and once in awhile the sun shines, the policemen wear tall steel helmets, just like the pictures you have seen in history books. The people here live a hard and difficult life on account of food rationing and we soldiers are also rationed, we get 2 razor blades a week and 7 packages of cigarettes. We are living on an old English Settlement and it is a beautiful place. The English people go for flowers and shrubbery and the grass is green now and the country is beautiful. I have changed my U.S.A. currency for English currency and it is some job to keep it straight and know how much one has got. Well, Mr. VALLOW, I got to close and hope I get the paper soon so I can read the boys letters.

- Mrs. Louisa METZGER, wife of Charles METZGER, residing in the Shanghai neighborhood, died suddenly Monday from heart trouble.

- Luster LeGrand HULTS was born in Alma twp., Marion Co., Ill., on Sept. 4, 1851, and died in Manteno, Ill. on March 10, 1944. In Oct. 1874, he was married to Mary Frances SEE of Alma, and they had 4 children. He is survived by 2 daughters: Mrs. Ralph LOVELL of Manteno; and Mrs. Wilfred M. POST of Williston Park, Long Island, N.Y.; 4 grandchildren, Floyd E. LOVELL of Manteno; Mrs. Floyd BRYANT of Chicago; Cpl. T. Ralph E. LOVELL of Signal Corps, Cal.; Mrs. Helen MANN of Marissa; 2 great-grandchildren, Wm. BRYANT and Sandra MANN; a sister, Mrs. S.M. WILSON of Los Angeles, Cal.; and a brother, John HULTS of Sheridan, Wyo. Mr. HULTS was spent most of 70 years in Marion Co., Ill., but after the death of his beloved companion in 1923, he made his home with his daughter, Mrs. LOVELL. An accident happened about a month ago which rendered him helpless. The funeral was held from the Christian Church in Kinmundy with interment in Evergreen Cemetery.

- Mrs. Robert PARRISH underwent an operation for gall bladder trouble in the Salem Hospital yesterday.

- Friends and members of the O.E.S. helped Mrs. Elizabeth PARRILL of Chicago, celebrate her 72nd birthday by bringing her 72 beautiful red roses. She has been a shut-in for the past 4 years, following 10 months illness in bed. She will be remembered here by many of our older residents.

- Mrs. Chas. ROBB of Decatur is here visiting her sister, Mrs. Elizabeth ATKINS.

- Pvt. Charles MEYERS, who has been sojourning in Alaska, arrived here Monday to visit relatives.

- Mrs. Sarah MILLER, one of Kinmundy’s oldest and highly respected ladies was surprised by her children, Sunday, who came with baskets of food and enjoyed the day with her. Mrs. MILLER was 85 on Saturday. Those spending the day with Mr. and Mrs. MILLER were: Mrs. Nell WILSON of Decatur; Mrs. Herman KNECHT and daughter, Roberta; Miss Alma LANGHASS of Stanford, Ill., and Mr. Ank GRAY of this city.

- The local fire department was called out this morning to extinguish the flames from Burdette SHAFFER’s smoke-house. The building was too far gone when the alarm was given and consequently burned to the ground. Mr. SHAFFER was smoking his meat and when he left for work last night, thought his fire was out. His entire supply of meat, as well as many other things were burned.

- Mrs. Lucinda BOUSMAN, aged 90 years, who formerly resided in Kinmundy, died March 2 at the home of her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. C.L. WILLIAMS of Bothell, Wash.

- Kinmundy Lodge presented brother Curtis S. WATSON with a 50 year button.

- A Freak Hen: Chris JASPER, one of our local poultrymen, was asked to dress a nice fat hen for table use. He picked out a dandy specimen from his coops and dressed her Monday evening. In drawing the intestines he noted something a bit different from the many hundreds of chicken intestines he has seen. Upon close examination he found that this hen had 2 oviducts, more commonly called egg-bags. And upon closer examination, one could see that both these oviducts had been active. In this case, the hen was capable of laying 2 eggs each day. So, Mr. JASPER killed a very valuable hen not knowing it until it was too late.

- East Meadow Branch: Mrs. Jocie LEMAY and Mrs. Adina LEMAY and little daughter left Friday night for New Orleans, La. to visit Pvt. Clifton LEMAY.

- East Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. T.A. McCULLEY attended the funeral of Mr. Lus HULTS, Sunday.

- East Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. W.F. ROBB.

- East Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Bert GARRETT spent Wednesday afternoon at the W.F. ROBB home.

- Green Ridge: Truman DUGAN and son, George, spent last Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. George HEADLEY and family. George is leaving for the army soon.

- Young School: Mr. and Mrs. Virgil SEE and son attended a party at the Eura SHAFFER home on Saturday in honor of Mr. and Mrs. SHAFFER’s 10th wedding anniversary.

- East Zion: Lt. Duane WALTON of Air Corps came Saturday to spend a 10 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Adis WALTON and other relatives.

- Camp Ground: Allen EDWARDS received word that his brother, J.B. EDWARDS, had died in Tuscola.

- Mr. and Mrs. J. Fletcher COLE spent Saturday in Alma in the Lena WILLIAMS home, Cpl. Duane WILLIAMS being home on furlough.

- Pleasant Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Claude HIESTAND received the announcement of another little granddaughter born March 10th to Mr. and Mrs. Virgil ROBINSON of Ohio.

- Wilson School: A group of about 30 relatives and friends gathered at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Eura SHAFFER Saturday in the honor of their 10th wedding anniversary.

- Wilson School: Mr. and Mrs. Jess CHARLTON and family spent Sunday in Farina with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John KAISER and brother, Clifford, who was home on furlough from the Aleutian Islands.

- Pvt. Lewis HAYES of Mo. spent Sunday here with his mother and niece, Mrs. Ivy HAYES and Miss Loretta HOYT, who has been real ill.

- Mrs. Chas. FOX returned home Monday from a 5 week visit with her sister and other relatives in Cal. and Nevada. She also visited about a week with her niece, Lt. Charlotte HOLT of U.S. W.M.C. in San Antonio, Texas.

- PFC Cecil JONES of Milwaukee spent Monday here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. Frank JONES.

March 23, 1944:

- Here’s a nice letter from Sgt. Charles JOHNSON, who has been very busy seeing the sights of Hawaii. He says: I have been here in the Hawaiian Islands for some time and have just now gotten around to dropping you a line. So please excuse my apology. It’s pretty nice here but it rains a lot. I guess several of the boys have been here before I so I expect you have heard all about it. I can’t write about our trip or what I’ve been doing here but I may write a very exciting book afer the war. I am tired of pineapples and cocoanuts already. I’ve seen several dear and wild hogs. Even as many as 12 in one herd in a small garage the other night. I was on guard the other night when a wild hog nearly ran over me. If he hadn’t been where I could see him we would of had pork. There is not much news and we cannot express our opinion about when the war will end but it can’t be too soon if it’s tomorrow. I would like to have the paper sent to my address. The news from home is first with us except letters from my wife. I believe I had better close and maybe in the near future I will be able to write more.

- Here’s one from Sgt. Carl PURCELL, asking us to do him a favor. We are always willing to oblige the soldier boys and we will have to ask the OWI and find out what can be done about this situation. He says: I still reside in England and wish to send my thanks for the paper I receive often. I wish to make a suggestion of request for your paper one week. Why not put in the boys army Postoffice number that are overseas. We all have friends in different places and we never know but what they may be our neighbors. By knowing their APO and going thru channels we can locate them many times. Just think of the home town boys here in England and I haven’t seen one of them and do not have their APO’s except for 2. Only a suggestion and thanks for the trouble.

- Here’s one from 1st Lt. Chaplain Gail HINES. He says: I am writing this to notify you of a change of address. I am in the United Kingdom now, and am keeping busy trying to learn the ways of this place. The people are most kind and helpful, and the country where I am located is most lovely. I am very pleased with my work here and am being given excellent cooperation and help. I trust this finds you all well. My regards to all my good friends there.

- Here’s one from T 5 Noah EAGAN, who is seeing the sights of merry old England at the present time. He says: There is not much I can tell you. I am now overseas. I didn’t have much time before leaving, hope you have my new address by now, for I sure enjoy getting the Express and I am getting my mail O.K. Everything is rationed here. So far we get 7 packs of cigarettes and 2 candy bars each week. The chow is better over here, we were always told it was over here before. The trip over was alright. Some of the boys lost their chow a few times. The morale is good. Haven’t taken a pass yet, am waiting to take my next ride back and hope it is soon. Good luck and keep the Express coming our way.

- CONANT-ROBB: Mr. and Mrs. Marvin CONANT announce the marriage of their daughter, Velma Jean to S. Sgt. Harold W. ROBB, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wes ROBB. The ceremony was performed by Rev. SWENERTON at 4 p.m., March 10th, in the Methodist Church at Santa Barbara, Calif. Both bride and groom are well known here. They are graduates of our local high school. This happy couple are now at home to their many friends at 313 South 1 St., Lompoc, Calif. We join their many friends in extending hearty congratulations.

- Cadet Russell SHAFFER of Minneapolis, Minn., arrived here Sunday to spend the day with relatives. This was Russell’s first trip home in 2 years. A dinner was Russell’s first trip home in 2 years. A dinner was given at the Lowell DISS home in his honor. Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. Noel SHAFFER and family of Alma; Mrs. Gertie BARRAL of Salem; Mr. and Mrs. Eugene SHAFFER and family and Mr. and Mrs. Burdette SHAFFER and family.

- Mr. and Mrs. John BLAIR of Carter announce the arrival of Nancy Eileen, in St. Mary’s Hospital in Centralia. The BLAIRs now have a son and daughter. Mrs. BLAIR was the former Tion EAGAN of this city.

- Louisa STOCK METZGER, daughter of Jacob and Dora STOCK, was born May 21, 1865 in Fayette County, Ill., and grew to womanhood on the old homestead now owned by John SEITZ. She married on Nov. 19, 1884 to Chas. METZGER, and they established a home on the same farm where she died on March 13, 1944. They had 5 children, 4 sons and1 daughter, 1 son dying in infancy. On Nov. 19, 1934, Mr. and Mrs. METZGER celebrated their Golden Wedding anniversary, and plans had already been made for their 60th anniversary next fall. She was a life long member of St. Philomena’s Catholic Church in Kinmundy. She leaves her husband; 3 sons, John of Springfield, Joe of Randolph, and Henry of Decatur; 1 daughter, Mabel, of Kirkwood, Mo.; 14 grandchildren, and 1 great-grandson. Besides her parents, she was also preceded in death by 2 sisters and 2 brothers. Services were held at the Catholic Church in Kinmundy with interment in the Catholic Cemetery. A list of those attending the funeral from out-of-town was included.

- Mrs. Sarah MULVANEY, aged 76, died from a heart attack in her home here Sunday. She had attended church services and just returned home when she collapsed.

- Mrs. Genora GREEN LUHR died March 1, 1944 in Long Beach, Calif. at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Lyllian LANE. She was 80 years old on Sept. 1, 1943. Her husband preceded her in death on June 4, 1942. She leaves 3 sons, 1 daughter, and several grandchildren. She was a sister of the late Elizabeth SWIFT of this city, and Edward J. GREEN of Chicago. Interment was made in the Redlands, Calif. Cemetery.

- Mr. and Mrs. Wm. BAGOTT observed their 62nd wedding anniversary and Mr. BAGOTT’s 85th birthday on March 15, 1944 in the home of their daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Fred FLETCHER of Charleston, Ill. Mr. and Mrs. FLETCHER entertained to dinner in their honor: Mrs. Bert GUBBINS of Muncie, Ind.; Mr. and Mrs. Lowell BAGOTT and son, Tommy, of Louisville, Ky.; Mr. and Mrs. Paul BAGOTT and Mrs. Chas. FLETCHER of Charleston.

- Pvt. Willard WILEY is enjoying a 21 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry WILEY in Alma.

- Jesse GEORGE has moved his store in the building recently purchased from Mrs. D.F. NEATHERY. Since the purchase, Mr. GEORGE has had workmen at work rearranging and redecorating the interior.

- Pvt. and Mrs. Dwain WILLIAMS are visiting his mother, Mrs. Lela WILLIAMS in Alma.

- Meadow Branch: Monday evening, Fred CHANCE took his wife up to the school entertainment in Kinmundy, and she and daughter, Emmalou, remained there overnight at the home of Mrs. Mattie CHANCE. When Mr. CHANCE returned home, he found the front room of their house full of smoke and the linoleum on the floor was burning slowly, but before he got the fire extinguished, it had burned the couch and an upholstered chair and a big hole on the floor.

- Young School: Mr. and Mrs. Ellis WILKINSON received some pictures from their son, Pvt. Kenneth WILKINSON, who is somewhere in New Guinea.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT received word Saturday of the birth of a granddaughter to Mr. and Mrs. Elsworth CHANDLER of Weston, Ill. on Friday, March 17. The little Miss weighed 6 lbs. and 11 oz. and they have named her Lila Fay.

- Swift School: Word has been received here of the marriage of Miss Velma Jean CONANT to S. Sgt. Harold ROBB in California on March 10th. The couple will live in California temporarily. We extend congratulations.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Chas. LOWE and daughter spent Monday with his parents and brother, Ivy, who is home on furlough.

- PFC Pete KEEN of Michigan arrived Monday for a few days visit with grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene KEEN.

- East Zion: Pvt. Mac ARNOLD from a camp in Wisconsin, came Saturday night to spend a 12 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Cyrus ARNOLD and other relatives and friends.

- East Zion: Flight Officer Duane WALTON returned to his camp after spending a 9 day furlough here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Addis WALTON.

- East Zion: A large crowd attended the Sunday School party held at the Addis WALTON home Wednesday for Duane WALTON.

- A.S. Kenneth SMITH and sister, Doris of Decatur, spent the weekend here with relatives and friends. Kenneth just completed boot training in Idaho.

- Ensign and Mrs. Arthur GILBERT and daughter of Wisconsin are spending a few days here with their mother, Mrs. Josie GREEN and sister, Mrs. J.H. DISS and family.

- PFC James GREEN of Texas is spending a few days here with his mother, Mrs. Josie GREEN in the J.H. DISS home.

- Wilson School: Jess Charlton and family attended a family dinner in Farina Sunday at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John KAISER honoring her brother, Pvt. Clifford KAISER, who is home on a furlough from the Aleutian Islands.

- Albert HAMPSTEN received word recently that his son had landed safely overseas.

- Mr. and Mrs. Oscar CORRELL were called to the bedside of Mrs. CORRELL’s sister, Martha CUMMINS, near Yale, Ill. last Saturday. Their daughter, Mabel VOGEL of near St. Elmo, and their son, Albert CORRELL, accompanied them. Mrs. CUMMINS died on Monday. Albert HAMPSTEN of near Omega, also attended the funeral.

March 30, 1944:

- The first letter this week was received from Dwight DAY, RM3 c, who is looking over the grass skirts of Honolulu. He says: Have been neglecting to let you know how much I appreciate receiving the paper, so will attempt to do so now. Although it has been 2 months since I received it due to moving so much. Received the back issues from my parents this morning and enjoyed them very much. The scenery here as a whole is very beautiful. Honolulu is not so much different than any other city except every other store is a curio shop or an amusement house to catch the service man’s eye, which consists mainly of sailors. Will close thanking you again for the paper.

- Here’s one for PFC Darrell WILSON, better known to us as Bill. He is down deep in the heart of Texas and says: I will try and drop you a few lines, thanking you for the paper. I am writing this in my pu__tent in the heart of Texas desert. This life is not new to me though, for from my previous service in the army I had plenty of it. A few weeks ago I ran on to a boy from Kinmundy, Dwight HANNA, and we had quite a visit. I go see him quite often. Have it pretty nice here though, where am in camp, for my wife and baby are here in El Paso. Well I better close for this time, saying hello to everybody back there and thanks again for the paper.

- Here’s one from T5 Theodore L. GARRETT, better known to us as Roy. He is at present looking over the belles of Tennessee and says: Well, I will finally get around to writing you and thanking you for your paper. I have been having it pretty rough down here in Tennessee for it has been so rainy. I am in the engineers and we are having quite a time building roads when it rains every day. I receive your paper pretty good and it sure helps us keep up our morale. I know the boys overseas are certainly glad to receive it. I hope this thing ends soon so we can all get home again. I want to thank you again for the paper, for I know that I should have written you long ago, but I have so much writing to do, you can’t get around to everyone.

- Here’s another nice letter from Cpl. James ELLIS (one of the JEZEK boys) who is flying around over Florida. He says: After reading your Zatso column about the fishing of a one Mr. LOWE, in Florida, I wish to relate a little salt water fishing of my own. About 2 weeks ago, 4 of us rented a large boat with guide for a half day for $12. We had 3 chairs in the back and we dat down just like President Roosevelt in the movies. The guide would take care of our lines and throw them out. All we had to do was reel the fish in, and brother, we did that very thing. We caught over 100 mackeral in less than an hour using a spinner hook. We caught a bushel of nine-runners, some kingfish, a flounder, angel fish, lady fish, and some sheepshead. We caught one large catfish and 2 sixteen pound drum fish. These fish are not good to eat. The story is these 2 fish are mo_rning in salt water, making them no good to eat. We used some fiddler crabs for bait. There are millions of them on the shore. They look like large brown spiders except the males have one large pincer like a crawfish. Let me tell you, we were sure tired that night, but had a lot of fun. To top it all off, we could only keep 2 large mackeral apiece. All the rest became property of the guide and the boat for marketing, as this is the only way gas can be obtained for the boat. I would like very much to obtain the address of Tony PERGL. The last I knew, he was in Hawaii and belonged to the coast artillery. I want to take this opportunity in behalf of the service men to thank all of you people back home for all you have done for us in the way of food, equipment, bonds, blood bank, Red Cross, and U.S.O. We think it is swell. Keep it up. We are proud of you and Mr. VALLOW, for your special effort for our morale, thanks a million, for the paper will all those wonderful letters. The men returning from overseas have had only 2 gripes to amount to anything. One was the strikes which made them very bitter. The other was high salaries and large corporation profits some were getting, which seemed to us as if these people did not love their country very much. Politics we leave to you back home for you know what is best, as we are too far away from the picture. My training is nearly complete with just 2 weeks to go. It has been very interesting and a lot of fun. We have had ground school one half of each day learning all about the plane. We have studied engineering, armament, camouflage, anti-aircraft, chemical warfare, bombs and bomb racks, small arms, navigation, first aid, and medical lectures. We have had lectures and secret movies every day as well as training movies. In flying the other half day we have had bombing missions, gunnery missions, camera missions, instrument flying, etc. We have each gained a lot of knowledge and experience in a very short time. Our instructors have been men back from combat missions with 25 to 50 missions. They have given us many pointers for which we are very thankful. We have all the latest equipment plus battle knowledge for which we are thankful. We feel we are ready for the big show. We get along splendid as a crew. Our pilot was a former Boston Red Sox baseball player. 3 of us are married. I am the only father of the group. I have read several letters of Kinmundy boys in the Air Corps Ground Crew. These ground crew men do a lot of hard work and often work 18 hours a day. These are the men who keep our shp in the air. We think a lot of them for they are a part of us. We take the plane where they leave off. While in the air these men are ‘sweating’ the mission out and are ever so happy when they see us come rolling in. I certainly would like to meet these Kinmundy boys in the Air Corps. You boys in the other branches of service, we know that perhaps unduly we get a little too much glory. All we can do is help. You are the men who are going to win it for us and you are the fellows who do the dirty work. To you should go ever so much more honor and glory than you get. We know that. Now I say regards to everyone and would like to hear form the BROOM boy in India.

- Francis G. SULLENS, son of Mr. and Mrs. W.E. SULLENS of Alma, who is serving with the Marine Air Corps in the South Pacific has been promoted to Staff Sergeant.

- Orville U. SULLENS, better known as Sonny, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. W.E. SULLENS, who is serving with the Navy Marine Corps in the South Pacific has been promoted to Sergeant.

- Joseph Guin VALLOW has been promoted from PFC to T 5. He is located in Michigan.

- Tuffy, the blond cocker spaniel of Mrs. Gail MILLER and daughters, is now in the Navy. Tuffy was given by the MILLER family to the crew of number 520 Landing Ship Tanks Boat for a mascot. Judging from Tuffy’s picture taken with the crew on their boat, everyone is happy.

- Sarah Gertrude WILSON MULVANY was born north of Mt. Vernon, Jefferson Co., Ill. on July 11, 1867, and died at the home of her son, Charles, of Kinmundy on March 19, 1944. She married Wesley Henson MULVANEY of Marion county on Sept. 29, 1884. They had 10 children, 6 girls and 4 boys, all of whom are living except for 1 girl, Edith, who died in infancy, namely: Chas. A., Myrtle PERRY, Bell OUTHOUSE, of Kinmundy; Lucy THOMPSON of Farina; Ervin of Ivesdale; Raymond of Kinmundy; Nellie ALDERSON of Salem, Lillian YATES of Kinmundy, and Edward of Monticello. She also leaves 51 grandchildren, 26 great-grandchildren, 1 sister, Malissa ROY of Allerton; and 1 half-sister, Nina DONAHOE of Mt. Vernon. She and her companion was converted in Dec. 1885 and joined the Meacham Baptist Church in Oct. 1887. Her husband died Jan. 21, 1936. She lived with her eldest son and cared for his 3 children.

- Mr. and Mrs. Melvin F. DAVIS of Anniston, Ala. announce the engagement of their daughter, Margaret Frances, to Lt. William Ralph DAY of Alma. Miss DAY is a graduate of Anniston High School. Lieutenant DAY, formerly connected with the Texas Company, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Dwight C. DAY of Alma. He was recently stationed with the Fire regiment at Fort McClellan and is now taking flight training at Fletcher Field.

- Mrs. Martha DOWNS was remembered by her children, neighbors and friends on March 22, when she celebrated her 81st birthday. The day was made happy with a dinner at noon. Two lovely cakes were given by Mrs. Chester MENDENHALL and Mrs. Geo. NEAVILL. Dinner guests were: Mr. and Mrs. COLE, Zola BARBEE, Mrs. Icy GARRETT, and Mrs. Mary WILLIAMS of Alma, a sister of Mrs. DOWNS. In the evening 32 neighborhood children came and gave a program all singing ‘Happy Birthday’ other songs were by Glen LUX, Gene BAILEY, Charles WHITE, Donny CHEATUM, Billy VALLOW, Ted LEE, Xon HANNA, Lela Mae DOOLEN, June LEE, Shirley JASPER, Zola BARBEE and several numbers by the BAILEY children. The Allegiance to the flag was given, led by Billy AVERY. Easter egg candy was passed to all and then Mrs. DOWNS sent all the children to ZIMMER’s Café and BARGH’s Drug Store for ice cream. Mrs. DOWNS was born, married, and now living in the same block of Kinmundy.

- Mr. and Mrs. Eugene KEEN have a son born Sunday morning named Beryl Clayton.

- A baby boy was born March 27 in the Salem Hospital to Mr. and Mrs. Wm. CASSIDY, but lived only a short while. He was named Wm. Lee. Services were held Wednesday from the Linton Funeral Home with interment in Evergreen Cemetery.

- Mrs. Margaret E. MULVANEY, aged 76, was found dead Monday by her son, Fred. The Coroner’s Jury found that she died of a stroke.

- Mrs. Rose MARSHALL, 85, of the Meadow Branch community died in her home on March 28, from a few days illness. Services were held from the Linton Funeral Home with interment in Sandy Branch.

- Geo. K. PURCELL, 81, died Saturday in the home of his daughter in Clinton, Ill. after a lingering illness of 7 months. Mr. PURCELL was a native of Tonti twp and leaves many relatives there and in and near Alma. Most of his life was spent near Patoka. He is survived by the following, Mrs. Jeanette HYDOCK of Clinton; Mrs. Florence LAND of Sparta; Mrs. Olga ALTON of Danville; and Mrs. Georgia BRANSON of Salem; Fred PURCELL of Clinton; and Lynn PURCELL of Fort Wayne, Ind. Services were held in the Methodist Church in Patoka with burial in Patoka Cemetery.

- Services were held for Wm. WALKER, aged 82, of Alma on March 27 in the Alma Baptist Church. He is survived by 2 sisters, Mrs. Anna KRUSE of Moberly, Mo., and Mrs. Belle GREENWOOD with whom he resided.

- Pleasant Grove: Pvt. Paul SMITH of Kentucky spent last weekend with Ralph HIESTAND and wife.

- Pleasant Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Herschel ROSE and daughters were dinner guests Sunday of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Pearl ROSE. Afternoon and evening callers were Mr. and Mrs. Virgil SEE and son, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph ROSE and daughters, Mr. and Mrs. Claude ROSE and children, and Mr. and Mrs. Ralph HIESTAND, who came to help their father celebrate his birthday.

- Omega: Mr. and Mrs. Gene HELMS have a baby daughter in Salem Hospital last week named Mary Lee.

- Omega: Sgt. Zarold LEWIS, who is stationed in Arizona is spending his furlough here with homefolks.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. Hugh COPPLE of East Chicago, have a baby daughter named Barbara Ann.

- Meacham: Guests attended a party at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred COOK Sunday helping Geneva celebrate her birthday. A list of those attending was included. Sandwiches, pickles, angel food cake and coffee were served.

- Green Ridge: Bill WALKER of Alma died and interment was made in Martin Cemetery.

- Mrs. Ralph HOYT has recently received word that her husband has landed in Australia.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth ROBB and daughter, Judith Ann, spent Sunday in Kinmundy with Bert GARRETT and family.

- Swift School: Esta ROBB spent Sunday afternoon at the Clyde BASSETT home.

- Sgt. Elwin INGRAM of Michigan and T5 Dwight INGRAM of Georgia have been called home due to the grave illness of their father, Robert INGRAM.

April 6, 1944:

- Robert Lee INGRAM, son of William Coy and Mary GRAY INGRAM, was born in Kinmundy on March 28, 1880, and died at his home in Kinmundy on April 1, 1944. He was of a family of 6 children, 3 of whom survive him, namely, Charles H. of Drumright, Okla.; Nellie HOUSTON of Maroa, and Isaac Denton of Kinmundy; 1 sister, Jayne, dying at the age of 6, and 1 brother, Gray, dying at the age of 21. The mother died when Robert was just 3 years old. After the passing of the mother, an aunt, Miss Fannie INGRAM, helped the father in keeping the home going. Mr. INGRAM’s entire life was spent in Kinmundy with the exception of 7 years spent in the state of Washington where he was manager of an elevator. It was while there that he met his wife, Agnes EAGLESON. They were married on Feb. 20, 1907. Soon after the marriage, the couple returned to Kinmundy where they have since resided. They had 3 sons, who are now in the Armed Forces: Sgt. Elwin of Michigan; T5 Dwight of Georgia; and Pvt. Joseph now of North Africa. Upon returning to Kinmundy, he entered the milling business, which business he followed until his death. He was a member of the Methodist Church and Kinmundy Lodge; many years he was on the board of Directors of the Kinmundy Building and Loan Assn.; and for several years on Board of Education; 4 terms as alderman of the City Council; and 4 terms as Mayor of the city of Kinmundy. Services were held from the Methodist Church with interment in Evergreen Cemetery. (A picture accompanied this article.)

- J. Harley HAYS, Supt. of our High School was called to Barnes Hospital in St. Louis Thursday to be at the bedside of his mother who submitted to a serious operation that day. She died Friday morning. Services were held in Scottville, Ill. from the Christian Church.

- Mr. and Mrs. E.K. JUNKINS celebrated their golden wedding anniversary on Jan. 29.

- Mrs. Pearl JIMMERSON of this city became the bride of R.L. RUDELL on April 5 at the Methodist Parsonage in Kinmundy. They were accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. D.T. UNDERWOOD. Mrs. RUDELL is formerly of Drumright, Okla., and now is owner of RUDDELL’s Café in the Selmaville vicinity. The couple will reside in Salem. Those attending the wedding were Mrs. Nora OLDEN and Miss Wilma BOUGHERS.

- Margaret Ellen PICKEL, daughter of Fred and Nancy PICKEL, was born in Clay Co., Ill. on Oct. 10, 1867, and died on March 27, 1944. She married William H. MULVANY on Jan. 16, 1889, and they had 6 children, 5 sons and 1 daughter: Loyd, Lonnie, and Freddie of this community, and Clark and Arvie of Salem. The daughter, Carrie, died in 1905. She was also preceded in death by her parents, 1 sister, and her husband. She united with Brown Christian Church when quite young and remained a member until her death. Surviving are her 5 sons, 18 grandchildren, 8 great-grandchildren, and a number of nieces and nephews. One niece, Mrs. Maude GRAY of Marseilles, Ill. was the only child of her deceased sister. Two grandsons, Roy COMBS and Gerald MULVANY are serving in the armed forces. Freddie and his family had lived in the home with Aunt Ella for nearly 4 years.

- We have received word about Lt. Arthur LARKIN, of Chicago, who is in the hottest of the battle area in Italy. Arthur is a pilot of a Thunderbolt, and has completed 48 missions over enemy territory in Italy, with much success to himself and the American fighters. Arthur isn’t exactly a Kinmundy boy but we do hold claim to his mother, the former Ruth HUMPHREY, and his father is Charlie LARKEN. Both parents were born and raised here, so we feel that again Kinmundy as always is hitting a big score. Congratulations to Arthur and his family.

- Mrs. Pat JAMES has returned from Rankin, Ill., where she was called last Friday due to the serious illness of her mother, Mrs. Belle WHITE. Mrs. WHITE died Saturday and was buried in Bess City Cemetery near Mason, Ill.

- Richard F. MOTCH, A.M.M. 3 c has been transferred from a Naval Air Base to the Naval Air Transportation Service, which flies supplies to Naval bases all over the world.

- The following have been asked to report to the Salem Selective Service for their pre-induction examination: Thomas L. GREEN, Roscoe Raymond OLDEN, Beryl F. LINTON, Ralph Wade LUX, Charles Elmer BERRY of Kinmundy, Lester McWHIRTER and James OSBORNE of Alma. In addition to these, Dwight ALEXANDER will go back for another examination. In all there will be 133 boys report for this examination.

- The home of Miss Stella COX was entered early Saturday morning while she was sleeping. The intruder gained entrance by taking out a window. Miss COX, being rather hard of hearing, was awakened by the flashlight of the intruder. She started to arise to turn on a light, thinking it might be her niece, Mrs. George NEAVILL, who lives nearby, coming to see her. At this a man pushed her down. But after 2 or 3 attempts she did get the light on and saw a man wearing a mask before her. At this Miss COX began to talk kindly to the man as if he were her own child, telling him of the wickedness of breaking into houses, more especially, those defenseless elderly people. And after a short while, the man left, after shaking hands with her. Miss COX stated that she could not hear just what the man said to her. After the intruder had gone, Miss COX went to the George NEAVILL home close by and told them what had happened. At this Sheriff LEWELLEN was notified and he and Deputy Sheriff HANKS were soon on the scene. They looked over the situation closely. Miss COX gave the description of the man as being of medium height, rather fleshy, had very soft hands, wore a large ring on one finger, a rather new pair of overalls, a cap and black mask. Sheriff LEWELLEN then returned to Salem and phoned to Springfield, Mo. for some blood hounds. These hounds arrived here about 7 o’clock that evening. The trail of the hounds led to the home of Mr. J.B. RENO, our barber. After a little investigation, he was taken to Salem for further questioning. The sheriff and his deputies are being helped in the case by Mr. H.O. DAVIS, special agent for the Texas Co., of Salem. Fingerprints were taken but we have not learned the outcome as yet. As we go to press, the sheriff still has Mr. RENO in custody.

- H.L. WARREN spent from Thursday until Saturday in Champaign with Mr. and Mrs. Frank BOSLEY and daughter, Jean, helping Jean celebrate her 18th birthday.

- Mrs. Roy LINGENFELTER has returned home from Lincoln, Neb. She was called there due to the death of her sister’s baby.

- Mr. and Mrs. Ben JENKINS left Tuesday for a vacation in Texas. They were accompanied by their son, Pvt. Erschel JENKINS, who is in camp there.

- East Zion: Mr. and Mrs. Clyde GREEN had a baby boy born Tuesday named Clyde Robert.

- Swift School: Mrs. Billie MORRIS and Mrs. Virgil LIVESAY were in Salem Wednesday where they met Mrs. Fred GAMMON. She had spent the past week in Ark. with her husband, Fred GAMMON.

- Swift School: Carol GARRETT and family spent Sunday afternoon with Clyde BASSETT and family.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Francis HAMMER and daughter, and Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth ROBB and daughter attended the show in Farina Saturday night.

- Swift School: Mrs. Frank GARRETT and daughter, Donna Mae, spent from Thursday to Sunday in the southern part of the state with Mr. and Mrs. Elsworth CHANDLER and 2 daughters.

- Meacham: Pvt. Harold SLANE of Missouri is spending his furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom SLANE and family.

- Meacham: PFC Harold LAMBIRD is at home on a furlough. He has been serving in the Southwest Pacific for the past 18 months.

- Mrs. Irene GAMMON has returned home from a few days visiting in Little Rock, Ark., with her husband, Fred GAMMON.

April 13, 1944:

- Here’s a short note from Sgt. Eddie HALLER, who is still in England. He says: Just a few lines to let you know I am still alive and receiving your paper. I want to thank you very much for sending it. I read about Vernon and Martha getting married. I wish I could have been there for more reasons than one (if you know what I mean). I didn’t get to read all the paper yet but you can rest assured that I will. I get a big kick out of your Zatso column and am sure everyone else does too. Everything is going fine so "Keep ‘em Flying".

- Here’s one from PFC Conrad REPEC, who has been in Oregon for some time, but is now on his way to other climes. He says: Well, my address has changed since I received you last paper and I want to make sure that I get the paper for its just like getting letters from home. It sure is nice to know what the people back home are doing. It makes a guy feel as if he were right there with them hearing them talk. I would like to tell you where I am but that is one thing we are not allowed to say and if I did the censor would cut it out. I just can’t think of anything to write. It is hard to write a letter when you know it is going to be censored. Well, I must close now. So long.

- Here’s one from Clifton LEMAY, who is down in Arkansas. He says: I am writing you to let you know how much I appreciate the paper you are sending me. I look forward to getting it, and it sure makes one seem right at home when he can read the news of his own hometown. I am very fortunate having a good commanding officer, Capt. Leo E. DONOVAN. I happened to work under Captain DONOVAN where he was working on the Illinois Central R.R. I had a surprise Sunday when Fred GAMMON came over to spend the afternoon with me. Well, Norris, I guess I will have to close as it is getting late. I want to thank you again for the paper and the trouble you have to go through with to make it possible for us boys and girls in the service to get the paper.

- Here’s a V-Mail from M. Sgt. John HANSON, who is now sojourning in New Guinea. He says: Just a few lines to let you know my APO number has been changed and how much I appreciate getting the Express. I enjoy your Zatso column very much, although I don’t agree with all you say, I find it very interesting. I am at present in New Guinea and this jungle is plenty rugged. If it wasn’t for military reasons, I’d say let the Japs have it. That would be a fitting punishment for them. But we are not having it too hard. The eats are very good and while we work hard, we sure don’t mind that, as beating the Japs is the main idea. As I advance I can see just what the morale of the soldier is and they have just one idea - to get this thing over with and get back home. We don’t get much news from the States and some of the things we hear don’t sound good. I believe that the ones at home complain and do not help the war effort are very much in the minority and those kind will always be around. How are things around Kinmundy? It has been years since I have been there for a long visit but I think about it often. I can’t say that I like Kinmundy better than any place I’ve seen, but it ranks right at the top. I wish to take this opportunity to thank the Chamber of Commerce for the carton of cigarettes. They sure came in handy. Well, guess I’ll close for now. Thanking you again for the paper.

- David Lovell EAST, son of Levi S. and Lillie EAST, was born at Weldon, Ill. on Jan. 13, 1898, and died after a brief illness at Dixon, Ill. on April 7, 1944. He was the oldest son of this family, there being one younger brother, Leon EAST of Salt Lake City, Utah. He married Jane GILLEY on Sept. 22, 1939. Early in life in joined the Christian Church in Salem and was active in the Masonic Lodge and Eastern Star in Salem. He leaves his wife, brother; 2 aunts, Mrs. Rose WHITTENBURG of Kinmundy, and Mrs. Maude BEIER of Centralia; and an uncle N.V. LOVELL of South Bend, Ind.

- Last Friday evening our city was visited by our first storm of the April season. During the storm one of the chimneys on the home of the Misses Ella and Evangeline PARRILL was struck and shattered, the house was filled with soot and smoke. To say the least there was a lot of work to do cleaning up. It goes without saying that these ladies were frightened to death.

- Bell SHIPMAN WHITE was born March 14, 1856 in Clay Co., Ill., and died April 1, 1944 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Arthur BUSHUE, near Rankin, Ill. She married W.Y. WHITE in 1875 and they had 9 children, 5 preceding her in death. Her husband died Jan. 16, 1928. She leaves 3 daughters; Mrs. Effie RONK of Urbana; Mrs. Arthur BUSHUE of Rankin, Ill.; Mrs. Pat JAMES of Kinmundy; 1 son, Merel WHITE of Neoga, Ill.; 2 sisters, Mrs. Lydia WHITE of Watson, and Mrs. Linda MURPHY of Grafton, Ill.; 33 grandchildren, and 12 great-grandchildren. In early life she united with the Christian Church at Old Union. Her last illness was of 6 months duration. Services were held at the Bethsadia Christian Cemetery.

- Julian NOCHMAN underwent an operation for a bowel obstruction in Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, Tuesday. According to his sister, Mrs. Lester ROBB, who is with him, he is getting along as well as can be expected.

- Pvt. and Mrs. Junior GORDON of Texas are home on furlough.

- AM 3 c and Mrs. Bennie DOOLEN of Washington arrived Saturday to visit their parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.R. DOOLEN and Lela Mae and Mr. and Mrs. Dwight PURCELL and family in Alma.

- In Loving Memory of our son and brother, Brownie DODSON, who died April 14, 1941. Mr. and Mrs. Chas. DODSON and daughters.

- A baby girl arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Elno WILLIAMS in Sterling, Ill. The mother is formerly Katherine LOWE.

- Cpl. and Mrs. James W. PIGG have a son who was born in Mark Greer Hospital in Vandalia Friday named James Wydell Jr.

- At the McCoy Methodist Church on April 2, Miss Margaret DAVIS, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Melvin F. DAVIS, became the bride of Lieut. William DAY of Alma. Attendants was Miss Helen SPARKS and Lieut. VOLLMER. John DETHRIDGE and William O’BRIEN served as ushers. Immediately after the ceremony, Lieut. and Mrs. DAY left for Mississippi, where he is stationed at Fletcher Field.

- Wilson School (from last week): Word has been received that Pvt. George MEYER is now stationed in Oklahoma and Cpl. Harold KLEISS in Virginia.

- Cpl. Harold W. KLEISS arrived Tuesday for a week’s furlough with his parents and sisters.

- Meacham: Eugene HARRELL of New York is home on furlough.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. E.G. DILLON attended the funeral Monday in Iola for Mr. Lovell EAST, who died at a hospital in Dixon. His mother was Mrs. Lillie LOVELL EAST.

- Omega (from last week): Mrs. Hazel MILLICAN and Mrs. Helen MILLICAN left for Nashville, Tenn. Tuesday to visit See MILLICAN, who is stationed there.

- Omega (from last week): We are sorry to hear that P.M. ROSE was injured while building a fence last week. He received a blow on the head from a sledgehammer while helping drive posts. He was taken to Salem Hospital.

- Arnold Chapel (from last week): Several people helped Harold JONES celebrate his birthday Sunday.

- Young School: Mrs. Anna MARLOW received a birthday greeting from her son, Herman, who is overseas.

- Green Ridge: Cecil ALDRICH is spending a furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jess ALDRICH, and other relatives.

- Pleasant Grove: Passion week services were held at Pleasant Grove last week conducted by Rev. HARD. On Thursday night a surprise miscellaneous donation was given he and Mrs. HARD. Sunrise services were held Sunday morning.

- Pleasant Grove: Pearl ROSE, who was in the Salem Hospital a few days last week receiving treatment for a head injury received while he and sons, Ralph and Herschel, were repairing fences, returned home Tuesday.

- Pleasant Grove: Mrs. Maxine BARKSDALE and pupils attended an Easter Party at Elder School Thursday afternoon. An egg hunt was enjoyed and prizes were given.

- Pleasant Grove: David SHAFFER, John GRIFFIN, Sammie HIESTAND, and Pvt. Paul SMITH of Kentucky enjoyed an egg roast, Easter. Paul returned to camp Sunday afternoon.

- Mr. and Mrs. J.L. HAMMER and Mr. and Mrs. Wes ROBB spent Easter in Sumner with Mr. and Mrs. Dale HAMMER and son.

- PFC Cecil JONES of Milwaukee, Wis. spent Thursday and Friday here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. Frank JONES.

- Meadow Branch: Mrs. Ira MARSHALL received word Sunday of the death of her brother-in-law, George METZGER of Shobonier.

- Pvt. Fred GAMMON of Arkansas is home on furlough.

- Martha and Peggy JACKSON met Kenneth JACKSON A.R.M. 3 c in St. Louis Thursday. He has a 15 day leave and is visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A.J. JACKSON. He is stationed at one of the largest Naval Air Stations in Texas.

- Mrs. Noah EAGAN and baby son, Daird Noah, are in Kankakee with her mother and celebrating the baby’s 1st birthday.

- Mr. and Mrs. Archie PATHEL and son, PFC Earl STANLEY, of Crete, spent the week here with Mr. and Mrs. Harve BRANSON.

- Mrs. James EAGAN and children are in Alma with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Cecil SHREFFLER and enjoying a visit with her brother, George, who is home on a 15 day furlough.

April 20, 1944:

- Here’s a letter from T 4 Robert L. BASS, who used to live here. He is at present in England and writes: I’m writing you a few lines to let you know I have received the Kinmundy Express for the first time yesterday and was sure glad to get it. Having spent 20 years of my life around and in Kinmundy, I sure enjoy getting the hometown news. Altho a lot of the older generation have moved, I still remember a lot of the names in the paper. I sure would like to have Lt. DOOLEN’s address as I am here in England too, and have been around quite a bit and can vouch for all the things he has said about this country and add a few more. The people here as a whole are very nice to us soldiers and so we have a pretty good time when we are not working. I enjoy those letters from the boys overseas that you put in the paper. I think all of us boys will have some very good stories to tell when we get back home. I have seen North Africa. You can guess the rest. Well, I might as well close for this is about all I can write for this time. Keep the papers coming as they help to keep up our morale.

- And here’s one from Pvt. Everett BASS, a brother to Robert. He is also in England and says: I want to say hello and to let you know I am getting along fine. I often wish I could come in and visit you and all my friends in your vicinity. But that will have to wait until I come back home I have been in the service 18 months. There are 3 of us brothers overseas and one somewhere in the South Pacific. The people here are just common people who have been under the burden of the war, but their spirits are really high in such conditions. The scenery is really beautiful. They are not as modern here as they are in the States, but it can’t be helped. The conditions are not too bad here. The American Red Cross is doing a wonderful job for our boys in the hospitals. They couldn’t ask to be treated any better. I have spent a few months in the hospital with a bad knee, but my knee is like new again. I haven’t received the Kinmundy Express yet but expect to soon. I send my regards to those, especially the ones around Meadow Branch School pals there who I often think of. Many of them are married and several are in the service. I wish that we could have an old school picnic after we get home and talk about our school days. Marshall and Bob are also near me. I have seen Bob and hope to see Marshall soon. I am following the same trade that my father followed for several years and hope to continue when I get back home.

- Here’s one from Pvt. George MEYER, who is down in Oklahoma. He says: I will try to write a few lines again to thank you for your paper. You sure made the change quick when I moved here from Arkansas. The paper was the first mail I received with the new address on it. I cannot thank you enough for the paper. When I made the move, I drove thru in a peep or a jeep as most people call them. The armored forces use a ‘p’ instead a ‘j’ in spelling the name is the only difference. I got to see quite a bit of the country. It was about a 300 mile drive. We would cross hills and level country alternatively all the way through alternately all the way through. I believe I like the country here better than I did in Arkansas. The soil here reminds me more of the good old Illinois dirt. One trouble with it is that 24 hours after a rain the high winds kick up an awful dust. It seems to dry and form a dust so quick. The area where the camp site is located is gently rolling around. In the short distance out on the reservation are some rather large hills or small mountains which ever you choose to call them. We have had rain and hail the last 2 nights. Looks as if it might try some more weather tonight. There is quite a difference in the living quarters here. I am staying in tarpaper covered huts about 14 feet square. Only 4 of us sleep in a hut so it isn’t so bad. In fact I rather enjoy the semi-quietness and more privacy than when we were in large barracks. They also have some nice large barracks. Over in the old Fort there are real nice dwelling houses. It looks like a small city over there. Children of all sizes and everything to make one think he is somewhere besides an army camp. They even have schoolhouses over there. There are about 300 Wacs on this post. There aren’t too many good looking ones though. They have them driving trucks and every thing around here. The enlisted men from a S. Sgt. on up have houses here where they can keep their wives and families. Of course, all of them can’t get a house, but a good many of them do. I don’t know what the town here is like as I haven’t been there yet. Some of the boys say it is a nice place while others say the opposite. Well I guess I may as well close as I don’t know any news. I enjoy the letters written by the boys overseas. Again, I will say think you for the paper and May God Bless You and Keep You.

- Here’s one from Lt. Lyle GREEN of the Army Air Corps. He is stationed in California and says: Must write and let you know that I have again changed my address. I am now at Palm Springs on the edge of the desert, and they say that it gets very hot here during the summer. I am in the Ferrying Division and taking planes to different places in the States. I want to thank you for the paper as I enjoy getting it every week.

- Here’s one from Cpl. Earl BRIMBERRY, who is stationed in Australia and sends us some Aussie money to prove it. He says: Today was payday and I was thinking you might like to have something from down under, so here is a ussie 10 shilling or one half pound note, worth about a dollar sixty. Their currency system is English and very easy to understand once you get on to it. I get my papers in bunches and at least 2 months old, but still they are welcome. I would appreciate it if you know for sure where the boys are, to give their addresses to my sister and I’ll look them up, when I get the chance, as air transportation is very fast here. These Islands are not very romantic or pleasant. I some times wonder if their Chamber of Commerce were in their right minds when they put out all that stuff. I could name a million things that are unpleasant, but the main one is the Jap and as long as we exterminate him I won’t mind the rest. The Aussies are wonderful fighters, but are very ingrateful for the help we have given them. That’s natural though, I guess. Well, give my regards to all the boys and girls. And to Guin and Millie. I hope none of them has to go thru this. Once again, thanks a million for your trouble and I hope to be back before too long to do it in person.

- S Sgt. Maxey M. SPENCER, son of Mr. and Mrs. Marshall SPENCER, residing south of this city, was graduated last week from the Army Air Force Flexible Gunnery School Loredo Army Air Field in Texas, a member of the AAF Training Command. He is now qualified to take his place as a member of the bomber combat crew. Along with his diploma, he received a pair of Aerial Gunner’s Silver Wings at a brief graduation exercises held here. Besides learning every to fire every weapons from camera guns to the deadly caliber .50 Brownings, he studied Turret manipulation, aircraft identification, stripping and reassembling of machine guns while blindfolded. He climaxed the course by air firing on towed targets.

- The names of the following will be included in the next call from this county: Carroll Wayne GARRETT, Glen Charles WHITE and Gilbert Lowe DOOLEN.

- On April 8, Miss Beulah GRAY and Charles Wm. ANDREWS, both of Salem, motored to Fairfield, Ill., where they were married in the Methodist Church. They were attended by Mr. and Mrs. Max FOWLER of Salem, a sister and brother-in-law of the bride. The bride is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E.O. GRAY of Salem. She was graduated from the Salem High School with the class of ‘40, and is now employed in the office of the circuit clerk in Salem. The groom is son of Mrs. Bertha ANDREWS of Salem, and Robert J. ANDREWS of Lawrenceville. He graduated from Kinmundy High School with the class of 1937, and is now employed with the Texas Company.

- Richard Lee HOWELL was born in St. Anthony’s Hospital on April 11 son of Mr. and Mrs. Lester HOWELL of Greenup, Ill. They now have 2 boys.

- Mr. and Mrs. D.F. NEATHERY entertained Mrs. NEATHERY’s children to dinner Sunday. The occasion was the birthday of Mrs. J.B. MAXEY and the 2nd wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. NEATHERY.

- Miss Donna Berneice ARNOLD, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ora ARNOLD of North Fork community, was inducted into the W.A.C. in St. Louis, Mo. on April 7. Pvt. ARNOLD will be in the Air Corps and is now in Des Moines, Iowa for her basic training. The ARNOLDs now have a son and daughter in the Army.

- Mrs. Emma ZIMMER fell in her home 3˝ miles southeast of town on last Thursday, and suffered a broken hip. She is in Salem Hospital.

- Mr. and Mrs. Paul HANNA have sold their place here in town, known as the Lizzie SWIFT residence, to their brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Roy KNABE of Chicago. Mr. KNABE has been inducted into the army, and Mrs. KNABE and her children will make their home here for the duration. Mr. and Mrs. Paul HANNA have purchased the Fred TSCHIDI farm containing 20 acres west of this city.

- The fire department was called out Saturday afternoon to extinguish a blaze at the W.H. ALLEN place in the south part of town. The property was occupied by the Rea GARDEN family. There was no one at home and a neighbor, Harold HOWELL, happened to look out and see the barn in flames. But the time the fire department arrived, it was practically burned down and all they could do is save the surrounding buildings.

- Mrs. Wes ROBB was hostess to the Linger Longer Club at her home on Friday afternoon, April 14th. Some of the members were unable to attend and were missed very much. The business meeting was conducted by the Pres. Mrs. C.B. MENDENHALL. After which clever contests furnished the entertainment for the afternoon, with prizes being awarded to Mrs. Chris JASPER, Mrs. C.B. MENDENHALL and Mrs. H.L. HANNA. Some were remembered with gifts from their Mystery Pals. The hostess served a delicious 2 course luncheon. Small Easter baskets full of candy were given as favors. They next meeting will be with Mrs. H.L. HANNA on Wednesday afternoon, May 17th.

- Mr. and Mrs. Roy KNABE and family of Chicago are expected here Saturday with their household goods, as Mr. KNABE is being inducted into the army soon. Mrs. KNABE and children expect to make Kinmundy their home for the duration. She is formerly Ruth HANNA.

- Wilson School: Fred KLEISS was called to Pesotum Friday owing to the serious illness of his mother, Mrs. Frank KLEISS, who suffered a light stroke.

- Mrs. Carl DUNLAP and Dorothy Frances of Morris have been spending the past week with Mrs. Icy GARRETT and Mr. and Mrs. A.C. DUNLAP. They were joined Saturday by Mr. DUNLAP and all returned Monday to their home.

- T.S. Wydell PIGG of Scott Field spent the weekend with his family.

- Mrs. Lewie SULLENS of Morris spent the first of the week with her mother, Mrs. Icy GARRETT.

- Wilson School (from last week): PFC Howard CRANDALL of Utah was a caller at the KLEISS home Tuesday morning.

- Miletus: A dinner was given in honor of George BUTTS at his home Sunday. He left for camp Sunday night from Salem along with many others. A list of those attending was included.

- Fred BOYD and George BUTTS left Sunday night for Chicago to enter the Army.

- PFC James GREEN of Texas spent a few days here this week with his mother, Mrs. Josie GREEN.

- Cadet Nurse Nancy LOWE of St. Louis spent the weekend here with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E.R. LOWE and son, David.

- Pvt. Earl SCHWABE of Louisiana is enjoying a 10 day furlough with his family in the Ray George home.

- Ed HEICHER and his sister, Miss Bertha, had the misfortune on Saturday about noon to lose their home by fire. Nothing was saved from upstairs, but most things downstairs were saved. The Farina Fire Dept. responded to the call.

- AM 2 c and Mrs. Bennie DOOLEN have returned to their home in Seattle, Wash. after a short visit here with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.R. DOOLEN and Mr. and Mrs. D.C. PURCELL of Alma.

- Pvt. Charles DISS of Cal. writes to his parents that he spent Easter in Los Angeles and Hollywood with his uncle, F.G. ARNOLD, S 1 c. He also met Fred WEAVER of Farina, who is in the Navy. They also had breakfast at Sardi’s.

- Mrs. Harry GRAY, Jr. has just received word from her husband that he has landed safely overseas.

- Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Walter WARREN have received word that their son, Bennie, is stationed in Iowa for his basic training. Their son-in-law, Robert FRYE, is taking an electrical course at St. Paul, Minn.

- Swift School: R.H. GREEN and wife and C.A. HANNA and wife attended the party at North Fork School house Saturday night for Miss Berneice ARNOLD. A large crowd attended. Sandwiches, coffee and cookies were served. Miss ARNOLD left Tuesday for St. Louis to join the W.A.A.C.

- Swift School: Pvt. Fred GAMMON and wife were dinner guests at the Francis HAMMER home Monday evening.

- Swift School: Forrest JONES and wife, and Bert GARRETT and wife spent Sunday evening with Frank GARRETT and family.

- Swift School: Pvt. Harold CHANCE is here on furlough with his parents, Seymore CHANCE and family.

- Swift School: Pvt. Fred GAMMON and wife ate supper at the Virgil GAMMON home Tuesday evening.

April 27, 1944:

- Robert Dale MAHAN, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.R. MAHAN is home for an 8 day leave before reporting to sea duty. Bob was one of the 400 young men to graduate from Annapolis Naval Academy in Maryland on Wednesday. He now holds the commission of Ensign, and was chosen to attend Annapolis by his high merits at the University of Illinois.

- The remains for PFC William Scott HUNTINGTON, 30, top-flight dance band guitarist and U.S. Army Musician are enroute to Centralia under military escort for burial. Pvt. HUNTINGTON was born in Centralia on July 27, 1914 to Harry and May MATTHEWS HUNTINGTON and was married in Chicago to Muriel EHRENS on July 19, 1940. He was educated in Centralia Schools, and of the Musicians Union in Chicago. His survivors include his parents; his wife; a son, William Ray HUNTINGTON; and a sister, Mrs. Mary Catherine DAVIS of St. Louis, Mo. He was inducted into the army on July 23, 1943 and had lived in Chicago the preceding 7 years. Although he considered Centralia his legal home, he had traveled extensively with musical organizations throughout the United States, and was affiliated at various times with the National Broadcasting Co. Ray NOBLE’s orchestra and the Art JARRETT recording band. The mother of this lad was formerly a teacher in our local school.

- Sarah Elizabeth EAGAN was born Dec. 17, 1884 in Kinmundy twp., and died at her home in Kinmundy on April 21, 1944. She was converted at an early age and united with the Methodist Church at Delta, Ill. She leaves 1 sister, Lucinda VICK of Mounds; a nephew, James EAGAN of Kinmundy; and a niece, Mrs. Mary HANSON and husband, Cpl. Eldred HANSON of Neosha, Mo. Services were held from the Methodist Church with interment in Sandy Branch Cemetery.

- Mr. and Mrs. F.G. ALEXANDER have finished their flower crop. They shipped 210 boxes containing an average of 75 dozen to a box. These were 2 varieties of Jonquils, the Empress and Emperor. I.D. INGRAM has shipped 25 boxes of Jonquilis. Chas. GAMMON is right in the midst of his flower harvest, the poet’s narcissus.

- On April 18, 1894, Miss Etta MARSHALL, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Early MARSHALL residing north of Alma, became the bride of Jacob McCARTY, son of Mr. and Mrs. William McCARTY of Alma. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. W.J. SIMER in his home in Omega twp. Immediately after their marriage, this couple took up their residence in Alma where the groom engaged in farming. A few years ago they purchased the farm east of Kinmundy where they now reside. Both Mr. and Mrs. McCARTY were born in this county and have lived here all their lives, and they have now reached the ages of 73 and 72 respectively. They have had 8 children, all living: Marshall of Iola; Burdette of Salem; Charles, Harvey, and Glenn of Kinmundy; Mary FAHRENBACHER of Olney; Helen MARQUART, Kenneth, and Velva PETIT, of Harvey; and they have 23 grandchildren. Last Sunday, this couple was surprised when their 8 children and most of the grandchildren came with well filled baskets to help them celebrate the 50th anniversary. The table was decorated with 50 yellow roses, and in the center a 3 tier cake with a gold leaf representing each child, and a yellow rosebud for each of the 23 grandchildren.

- Mr. and Mrs. James JONES have a son, Don Dennis, born in their country home on April 26. The JONES have 2 sons.

- Mr. and Mrs. Bruce MORGAN of Karnak have a son, Robert Eagan, born April 16. The mother was the former Dorothy INGRAM.

- Pvt. Harold CHANCE returned to his camp in Missouri on Thursday.

- Mr. and Mrs. W.T. PHILLIPS and Mrs. Chris JASPER and daughter, Shirley, were in Mattoon, Tuesday and Wednesday of last week attending the funeral of their brother-in-law, Hallett CRAIG.

- F2 c Walter McHATTON of Farragut, Idaho, is home on a 10 day leave.

- Pvt. Fred GAMMON returned Saturday to his camp in Arkansas.

- The Boards of Education of Districts 500 and 25 held a joint meeting last week and re-employed J. Harley HAYES as superintendent, and Mel BOYD as Janitor. They grade school board re-employed all their teachers, namely, Annie YOUNG, Alice READNOUR, Hester HEATON, and Alice FRENCH. The following High School teachers have signed contracts to return again next year: Miss LEMMEL, Miss BIGNANI, and Mrs. FINDLAY.

- Mr. and Mrs. A.C. DUNLAP and Mr. and Mrs. F.G. ALEXANDER were in Centralia Saturday attending the funeral of PFC William HUNTINGTON. Scott MATTHEWS, New Orleans, accompanied them home and visited relatives, the JACKSON, DUNLAP and ALEXANDER families.

- Pleasant Grove (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Guy SHAFFER and daughter, Ruth Edna, and Mr. and Mrs. Herbert ANDERSON and daughters spent last Sunday with Paul SHAFFER and family in honor of Paul’s birthday.

- Swift School: Mrs. Billie MORRIS received word Thursday that her nephew, Sgt. Otto MAULDING, Jr. was missing in the African area. He was a radio Gunner with the Army Air Force.

- Swift School: Wionna HANNA spent Sunday with Mary Evelyn and Helen BASSETT.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Elsworth CHANDLER and 2 daughters from the northern part of the state are here visiting Frank GARRETT and family.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Forrest JONES spent Monday evening at the Frank GARRETT home.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. James JONES have a baby boy named Don Dennis.

- Lt. and Mrs. John MARTIN spent a few days here with their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. W.T. WILKINSON. Lieut. MARTIN received his commission last week in Texas. Mrs. MARTIN is formerly Virginia WILKINSON.

- F 2 c and Mrs. Walter McHATTON spent Saturday in Salem visiting Mrs. McHATTON’s sisters, Mrs. Ed BAUER, Mrs. Chas. McKEE, and brother, Marvin WILLIAMS.

- Green Ridge: Those who came to help Mr. Frank DOUDERA, Sr. celebrate his 7__ th birthday Sunday were: F.L. DOUDERA and family, Mr. and Mrs. Edd DOUDERA, Clyde OSBORNE and family, Mr. and Mrs. Joe DOUDERA, Mr. and Mrs. Harry DOUDERA, Mr. and Mrs. George DOUDERA, and Mr. DIXON.

- Hugo ZIMMER is spending his leave here with his wife and baby in the home of Mrs. Gladys EAGAN.

- Omega (from last week): Lewis HAMPSTEN, who has been in the hospital in California is spending a 30 day furlough here with his father, Albert HAMPSTEN.

- Omega (from last week): Frank ARNOLD, who has been overseas, is home on furlough.

- Prairie Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Glen McCARTY gave a party in their home April 18 for their son and daughter, Jerry and Imogene, for their 19th and 17th birthdays respectively. Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. Lester VANSCYOC and family, Mrs. Lewis MOSES and family, Mr. and Mrs. Art WEISS and daughter, Jake McCARTY, Audrey and Billie HANBAUM, Dorothy COMBS, Helen ERNST, Wm. MARLOW and Beryl GREEN.

- Prairie Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Glen McCARTY and family attended a basket dinner in the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jake McCARTY Sunday in honor of their 50th wedding anniversary.

- Prairie Grove: Marvin CHANDLER of the U.S. Navy is spending his leave here with his wife and daughter, Sandra, and other relatives.

May 4, 1944:

- Here’s a letter from A C Walter WILLIAMS, who is on his way down in Texas. He says: Again I find myself with a new address - this time deep in the heart of Texas. I have been avoiding this part of the country as much as possible but since so many flying schools are located in this location, it was impossible to miss it entirely. This is my last phase of training, so maybe it won’t be so hard. I haven’t received the paper as regularly as in the past. This is probably due to the fact that we had another fellow whose name was very similar to mine and I find most my mail is missent to him before it reaches me. Now that we have individual boxes, I think that will end the confusion. Again I wish to give my inadequate thanks and deepest appreciation to you for the paper. We all look forward to our home town paper. If my luck holds, I will get my wings in 2 months after which I expect a well deserved furlough. I hope to see you then.

- Here’s a V-Mail letter from Cpl. Robert HANNA, who is on duty somewhere around New Guinea. He says: It has been my intention of writing you a letter and thanking you for the Kinmundy paper for quite some time but just neglected to do so. I have been in the army 3 years today and have received your paper regular all the time. I really enjoy it as it keeps me posted on the folks at home. I have met a couple of Kinmundy boys since I’ve been overseas. I met James HAMMER the first time I went to town. I wrote home for Elwin TROUT’s address and looked him up. We saw each other 1 time and then he was sent away from this part of the country. I had a nice visit with both boys and hope to be seeing them before so very long on the streets of Kinmundy. I could write you lots about the country over here, but as yet I have seen nothing worth writing home about. I wouldn’t trade one little part of Kinmundy for all the country this side of the ocean. I am still in a veterinary section, but am attached to a Medical Supply Dept at the present time. I hope to back doing veterinary work again before long, but don’t know if I will be or not. Well I am about to run out of writing space here so will sign off for this time. Thanking you again for the paper.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Charles MEYER, who is stationed in Maryland for the present. He says: I thought I would drop you a line or 2 to let you know that I have changed my address. I have been getting the paper pretty regular since I came back to the states. I have changed addresses again since I was home on furlough as I told you I was in Colorado. I have been only a little more than 3 weeks. And I am beginning to like this camp better than I did in Colorado. I am going to New York some weekend. I can go there in 3˝ hours, so I can have a good time and get back to camp before my time is up. Well, I will have to close now and go to work. I will try to write more next time when I have time to write. So until then good luck to all and may all of us boys be home before long to stay for good.

- Here’s one from Charles SEE SC3 c who is stationed in Florida. It is short but we know he means every word of it. He says: For the past 2 years, I’ve been receiving your paper weekly, keeping me informed with the news going on in my home town. I am sincerely sorry if I’ve never had the presence of mind to thank you. Now in closing I thank you sincerely.

- Here’s one from T Sgt Chloris WILLIAMS, who like many other lads is seeing the sights of England. He says: Just a few lines to notify you of my change of APO. And to thank you for sending me the paper, while I am in the service. I enjoy reading it very much, especially the letters from the boys and your Zatso column. I think the suggestions by Carl PURCELL is a very good one if approved by the OWI, for it would be very nice to see some of the fellows and that would be a very good means for location them. I have been looking for the WRIGHT boys for some time, but do not have a chance to find them due to not having their APO number. Well there isn’t much to say which has not already been said in regards to the country over here, other than I like it a lot and am enjoying my visit much more than I expected. Thanking you again for the Express. I will say Cheerio for now.

- Here’s that long-looked for letter from Wayne PIGG, ARM 1 c, who is now sailing the seven seas. Wayne used to pound our linotype machine but told us he was well satisfied in the Navy for the present at least. He says: Many thanks for sending the paper. I usually receive it in bunches, and not in the order of publication then, but don’t think I have missed any issues. Even under those conditions each paper becomes more value than the last, especially since I left the states. That is not long compared to most of the boys, but I’ve already been convinced there is not place like the U.S.A. There’s not much I can say now, but I am sure waiting for the day I can say it in person. Until then, just keep the press rolling.

- Here’s one from a lad in the service who asked us not to publish his name. In fact, he asked us not to publish the letter, but the letter does bring out some mighty good points and so as long as we withhold his name, it shouldn’t make a difference. He says: I haven’t been much to write letters to you, but that doesn’t mean I don’t look forward to reading the Express each week. It seems as if I do well to write home occasionally and that always come first. I think your decision to accept help on your "Free Express to Service Men" is right. I want to kick in a little for those folks who can’t afford to pay for a subscription for every boy they have fighting, because I know these boys are the ones that want and need the papers each week. A thought just flashed thru my mind that occurred several times the past winter as I read the paper. What has happened to the High School reporters? I certainly missed the accounts of school athletic activities, etc. I don’t know who was to blame; nevertheless, I sure missed that information. Remember I am helping because I have been away from home most of the time for the past 7 years and I know what the paper means.

- Many Kinmundy friends have received invitations to the wedding of Miss Alice POWER and Frederic A. PRUETT which will take place at 8 o’clock Saturday evening, May 13, in the Community Church in Ventura, Calif. Frederic’s mother and sister, Mrs. Estella PRUETT and Mrs. H.A. LANDESS are visiting him at present and will return home after the wedding.

- April 28th Mrs. Nancy A. NEIL passed her 85th birthday quietly at home. She received many cards, gifts and personal calls.

- Mrs. Reindl BAYLIS received word last week that her brother, Pvt. Earl LEAT, who is stationed in Texas, was promoted to Technician 5th Class.

- Mrs. Hattie COCKRELL attended the funeral of her brother-in-law, John ANDERSON, in Murphysboro last Friday. Burial was in Elder Cemetery in Kinmundy.

- A baby girl was born April 23 to Mr. and Mrs. J.E. GRADY in Chicago named Sharon Ann. Mr. and Mrs. Gray DAVIS are the grandparents, and Mr. and Mrs. Luther DAVIS are the great-grandparents.

- T. Sgt. Otto T. MAULDING, Jr. Radio Operator and Gunner on a flying fortress, who was previously reported missing is now officially reported killed in action on March 26th, while on a mission over Austria from Feggia, Italy. According to information received from a buddy, who is now in the states, their plane was badly shot up and had 2 motors knocked out. But the crew was alright and they were trying to make their home base, but were forced to make a crash landing on the water within a hundred miles of their base. Three of the crew got out and were picked up but the remainder went down with the plane which sank immediately. They were probably stunned from the crash landing. Sgt. MAULDING had made close to 50 combat missions as he had expected to have his missions completed by April 1st and be in the states about the middle of April. Sgt. MAULDING is the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Otto MAULDING of Centralia, and a nephew of R.C. MAULDING and Mrs. Billie MORRIS of this city. Otto T. MAULDING Sr. is a veteran of World War I, having served with the 4th Division in France and was wounded in action.

- Glen SULLENS of Salem, formerly of Alma, and a brother of Lewie SULLENS of this city was killed instantly yesterday near Ullin, Ill. when he stepped into the path of a passing freight. SULLENS, who was a locomotive fireman for the C & EI, had just alighted from the cab of his engine which was on a siding.

- Mr. and Mrs. J.J. ALLEN of Granite City have their second child born April 25 in St. Elizabeth’s Hospital. The daddy of these children was raised in Kinmundy and is a graduate of our local high school.

- The Kinmundy Chamber of Commerce met in the basement of the Christian Church Monday with 58 members and guests served a delicious dinner by the ladies of that church. George BARGH, Jr. presented the following grade team with their letters: Jo BARGH, John GARDEN, Wallace BARBEE, Vernon JEZEK, Jack HOYT, John HOYT, and Bobby GEILER. Gene ALEXANDER and Millie BAILEY received letters as cheerleaders. J. Harley HAYES presented the following high school boys with their letters: Pleasant ROBNETT, William BROOM, Ira GAMMON, Junior GARRETT, Calvin BARBEE, Floyd GARRETT, Robert JOHNSON, and George BARGH, Jr. as manager. Kathleen BROWN and Jeanne UNDERWOOD received letters as cheerleaders. There was a letter for Kenneth PIGG who left a few days ago to join the Merchant Marines.

- Pleasant Grove: Ralph Woodson SIMER of Penn. and wife visited his mother, Mr. and Mrs. Francis SIPES, while on furlough.

- Pleasant Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Ted MAYBERRY and son, Fred of Salem, and Sgt. Flory REPEC of North Carolina, who is spending furlough with his mother, was calling on Pearl ROSE and family, Wednesday.

- Pleasant Grove: Friday being the last day of school at Elder, the teacher and pupils and some of the mothers, and Miss Goldie MULVANEY enjoyed a picnic dinner at Salem Park. In the afternoon, Miss Audrey took them to the show.

- PFC Charles DISS of Texas arrived home Saturday for a furlough.

- Sgt. Beryl DISS came Wednesday for a few days furlough. We know Mr. and Mrs. Orville DISS are happy to have all 3 of their boys at home.

- Mr. and Mrs. Manuel WELSH Sr. have received a letter from their son, Manuel, who is now somewhere in England.

- Wilson School: Several friends and neighbors gathered at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Eura SHAFFER Saturday to help Mrs. SHAFFER celebrate her (?) birthday.

- Wilson School: Miss Maude LEWIS closed a successful term of school Friday. A wiener roast was enjoyed by the children and several of the mothers.

- Prairie Grove: The school children enjoyed the day, Wednesday, in the home of their teacher, Miss Virginia ROBERTS.

- East Zion: James Kenneth WALTON, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Addis WALTON, fell off of a horse Saturday. The horse stepped on his mouth knocking out a tooth and loosening some other teeth and cutting a hole in his chin.

- East Zion: Merle JONES and family called at the Frank GARRETT home Sunday afternoon.

- Meacham: Mrs. Olga WEISS has received word that her son, William C. WEISS, S 1 c, had the misfortune to break his leg on a return trip to the States from foreign waters. The ship he was on ran into a heavy storm. He is stationed at a Marine Hospital in Georgia.

- Green Ridge: Green Ridge school closed today. The pupils and mothers went to the Salem Park and in the afternoon, attended the show. Mrs. Lucille LOWMAN was teacher.

- Swift School: A birthday dinner was held at the Sam LOWE home Sunday for Mrs. Lilly McCULLEY. Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. Thurman McCULLEY, Mr. and Mrs. Otis CHARLTON and John David, Mr. and Mrs. Paul SWIFT and Leroy, and Billy and Carol THOMS.

- PFC Darrell REESE is home from North Carolina being called here by the illness of his wife.

- Mrs. Elizabeth ATKINS has received a cablegram from her son, Lt. Raymond ATKINS, stating he has landed safely overseas.

- Mrs. Martha HUGGINS of Cerno Gordo, Ill. received word from her son, Harold, that he has landed safely in England.

May 11, 1944:

- Here’s a nice letter from T 5 Noah EAGAN, who from the tone of his letter, is following in the footsteps of his father, the late Harry EAGAN. He is now in England, so we are wondering if the English haircuts are any different from ours. Anyway, he says: Still in England and receiving the paper regularly as possible. No news lately, but I guess the war is still on as our cigarettes are still rationed. I thought James was going to get over here but he seems to have gone to Africa. I wish I had some of the boys APO numbers who are in England. I saw a boy from Centralia last week that I knew. His twin brother is in my company. The days are long here. It breaks daylight about 6:20 a.m. and gets dark about 11 p.m. I have never mentioned this before but I am learning a trade in this army. I was Battalion barber up until this week, now I cut my own Co.’s and the battalion officers hair and am kept very busy. This makes me have only one formation each day, revelry. I have got in about 1 year of barbering now. My army day is from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 6 days a week. I am rated to drive a semi-truck when we move from here. I have had several different jobs in this outfit. I spent about 5 months as a crane operator and truck driver, 3 months of this was in the "wilds" of Louisiana on maneuvers, also spending a month in power shovel school in Virginia. I operated a power grader in the desert at Imperial Dam and spent some months as assistant motor Sgt. But the job I like best is thinking of the day when I can be home. Well, Norris, thanks again for the paper and keep the press rolling. It sure helps the morale.

- Here’s one from Sgt. Zarold LEWIS, who is still in New Mexico. He says: Enclosed find a donation for the paper. I want to thank you for sending me the paper for so long a time. I know most of the boys in the service realize how much it costs you to send it to us and am sure the boys still in the states will send you the price. As for me I cannot do without it. I have been in the hospital for 2 weeks with tonsillitis and sinus trouble and count the days until the paper arrives. I get my copy on Monday evening and read all of it including the advertisements. Thanking you again for the paper.

- Here’s one from Cpl. Phil SHORT, who has seen plenty of action in North Africa and Italy and is now in England. From the tone of his letter, he has other things on his mind also. He says: Just a line to let you know I haven’t forgotten you and the rest of Kinmundy. Would like very much to see all of you again, maybe it won’t be so terribly long before I can. But the main thing is to thank you again for the papers I have received. The Kinmundy Express really gets around according to some of the letters the boys have sent you. I have received it myself in places I never thought I would be, but have always managed to read it even though sometimes I didn’t know if I should read or do some more improving on a good deep hole. There is always room for that being as I am inclined to be on the lazy side. Of course, everyone knows that the army is at fault for that, for I never was afraid of work. But so much for that. For a change I am having a wonderful time here. Haven’t seen any of the boys but Lee. Sure was good to see him. It had been a little over 2 years since I had seen him, thanks to a great change that got me here. I have a beautiful girlfriend. We have been engaged a month tomorrow. I won’t send you her picture for I know everyone will be wondering what magazine I cut it out of. I will wait and maybe produce the goods, ha. But don’t forget I said maybe because anything these days are subject to change. Well I must close for now and write to my sis. I received a letter from her today wondering why I hadn’t written to her. I just don’t have time to write to everyone these days. Thanks a lot for the paper and wishing you all the best.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Oliver BASS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe BASS, who used to live here. He is at present in England and says: I am alright. Bob and Everett and myself are somewhere in England. They have met each other, but I haven’t met them yet. My youngest, brother Pearl Eugene, is in the cavalry somewhere in the Pacific. He was 18 last August. I have received the paper and saw the names of many of my old school chums in the service list. I believe Roy DOOLEN, if he is Cleve DOOLEN’s boy, I went to school with him at Swift School. Rex GAMMON, Joe and Anne SLOVICK and many of the boys of hat age I went to school with are now in the service. I am in a gun battalion while Bob is in the Medical Detail of Engineers, and Everett is in the Engineers.

- Here’s one from Sgt. Raymond MOELLER, who is also in England. He says: Have been wanting to write for quite awhile and until tonight I have just let it got from one night until the next. So right at the present time I will try to write to you and thank you for my papers which are coming pretty steady now. In today’s paper that I got, you wrote in your Zatso that you thought that you were about washed out when it came to being a weather prophet. You know what I think that I could be a weather prophet as all that, as all I would have to say would be shower and fog, then I would hit it pretty well around here. But then the last few days has been rather nice. It kinda makes me want to go out in the field, but some reason or another the job that I have now does not include the kind of field work that I like, in plain words it has plenty of field work. A few week ago, I had my biggest surprise since I have been in service. When I came in from my days’ run I got to my mansion (tent) and found my brother-in-law lying in my bunk, I think I must have stood there as I was so much surprised that I could say nothing. He got to stay with me for 3 days and the time went so fast for us, as that was the first time we had seen each other since Jan. 2, 1942, and I think we talked of everything that ever happened to either of us back in the good old state of Illinois, and some of our newer experiences that have happened in the last couple of years. I was driving on a highway a few days ago, and I happened to see a farmer in the field rolling on his wheat ground. And I have never seen anybody hook up a team the way they do around here. When they use one team, they hook one behind the other, then the farmer drives the front horse and either leads or rides the other horse. It seems kinda funny the way that they do everything backwards. I think that maybe in the near future that I may see them back the team instead of letting them go forward and I think that as soon as I see that then I shall have seen everything. They never have but one horse hooked to a wagon, but most all of their wagons are a 2 wheel outfit. They have a dump box on them and most of the time they lead the horse. I think they like to walk a lot better than we do back in the states. When you see them walking on the streets, and ask them where a certain place is they will think for a second and then say it is up the road about 5 or 10 minutes walk, then you can’t miss it. And if they should happen to forget to say you can’t miss, well, you may as well go into a pub (tavern) and have a few pints of bitters (beer) as you can’t find the place you were looking for. I am sending along our daily paper that we get here in camp. I think perhaps you will be interested in it. When they printed this copy they were celebrating their 2nd anniversary and I think it is quite interesting because they gave it’s history. Well as it is getting rather late, so I think that I will close for this time. So again I want to thank you for the very best paper we can get. I have 2 very good friends, one is from Odin, Ill., and the other one is from Dixon, Ill., and they too enjoy the paper very much.

- Here’s a V-Mail from Pvt. Charley NEAL, who is also in England. He says: After reading your first issue of the March paper it reminded me that I had forgot to write you. So here I am after so long a time. I want to take a few seconds to thank you for the paper. It is a little late but as some of the boys said, it makes you feel like you are at home or close to home. The weather is nice here in merry old England at this time. It has been damp and cool but no like it has been back there in Illinois. I enjoy reading the letters the boys write from all over the world. Keep the papers coming and I am sure none of the boys will wait so long to write the next time.

- Here’s one from Lt. John SHAFFER, who is stationed in Nebraska. We hadn’t heard from John since he was married, and was just wondering what had happened to him. He says: I imagine all the other 325 boys have written so it is time that I did. I have enjoyed reading the other boys letters, but never got around to doing anything so strenuous as letter writing anymore. Rudy does all the letter writing any more. I don’t write one letter in 3 months. About this subscription business. I remember when I first came into the Army, I had to get along on $21.00 per month. In fact, I think if it had been necessary, we could have saved 12˝ cents a month extra out of it too. Not being a newspaper man, I had just never thought how much it would cost to mail 325 papers each week. I think we guys can pay for our own subscriptions. As much enjoyment as we get out of it, it is dirt cheap at a dollar and a half a year. What about it fellers? I am still with the school here at Fort Crook. Just now, I have a class of French soldiers from Martinque. They are learning to rebuild tires. They are beginning to learn a little English and I am picking up a little French. Most of our talking we do with our hands. When I have a job to do, I wave my hands while and they start to do it. If they don’t do it right, I say "no", and they do it differently. This goes on, with more hand-waving, until they do it right. Then I say, " Wee, Wee", and everyone’s happy again. The biggest job is grading papers. I write the questions in English, and an interpreter translates them into French. Every weekend, Ruby and I have 200 papers to grade. How we grade ‘em is another story, but we do it. We moved one day last week from 1 place to another here in town. I brought a couple of them home to help me and Ruby got so chummy with one of them, I was glad when I got them back out to camp. I forgot to tell you these French boys are negros. Thank you for the paper. I must close and go to bed.

- Sgt. Beryl DISS and Miss Eileen BRUBAKER were married in the Methodist Church in this city Wednesday. They were attended by Mrs. Sherman TUCKER of Salem, friend of the bride, and Leland OLDEN, friend of the groom. Several relatives witness the ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jess BRUBAKER residing east of Salem. She is a graduate of Salem High School with the class of ‘38. She received her training as nurse in the Olney Sanitarium and since her graduation, has been employed at the Salem Hospital. The groom is the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Orville DISS of this city, and a graduate of Kinmundy High School with the class of ‘38, and was among the first of the boys to be called into service of this country. The infair dinner was held Wednesday evening at the home of the bride’s parents. Sgt. DISS will return to Texas Saturday accompanied by his bride, where they will make their home for the time being.

- The following men have been called for their preinduction examination: Jason GOODWIN, Delbert FISK, Lawson GEIBE, Frederick MISELBROOK, Francis KRUTSINGER, Walter BRIMBERRY, Garold BUTTS, Dale BRASEL, William BROOM, Raymond DOUDERA, Harold JONES and Vernon SINCLAIR.

- BELCHER-BASSETT: Miss Nellie Fern BELCHER, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Owen BELCHER, Patoka, and Cpl. James Marvin BASSETT, son of Mr. and Mrs. James BASSETT were married Thursday, 3 p.m., May 4, 1944, at the Christian Church in Patoka. Rev. Robert GRAHAM performed the single ring ceremony. Mrs. Evelyn BALLANCE played the wedding march and Mrs. Alta LOGAN sang "At Dawning" and "I Love You Truly". The bride was attired in powder blue with brown accessories and a corsage of white and pink rosebuds. Her attendant, Mrs. Ruth WILLIAMS, sister of the groom, wore a floral dress with navy blue accessories and corsage of pink rosebuds. Cpl. BASSETT had as his attendant, Wendell BELCHER, brother of the bride. The immediate family of both attended the wedding with a supper at the bride’s home following the ceremony. A charivari and shower extended them in the home of the groom’s parents Saturday evening. Cpl. BASSETT has been enjoying a 13 day furlough from his camp in Texas.

- Sgt. Beryl DISS and Miss Eileen BRUBAKER were married in the Methodist Church in this city on Wednesday. They were attended by Mrs. Sherman TUCKER of Salem and Leland OLDEN. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jess BRUBAKER residing east of Salem. She is a graduate of Salem H.S. with the class of ‘38, and received her training as a nurse in the Olney Sanitarium and since her graduation been employed in the Salem Memorial Hospital. The groom is eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Orville DISS of this city, a graduate of Kinmundy H.S. with the class of ‘38, and was among the first of the boys to be called into the service of his country. The infair dinner was held in the home of the bride’s parents. Sgt. DISS will return to Texas Saturday accompanied by the bride, where they will make their home for the time being.

- P.R. 1 c and Mrs. Joe BORING have a son born April 26 in Kingsville, Texas. Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Joe BORING of this city.

- On May 10, Mrs. J.B. MAXEY entertained a group of neighbor children and friends to a birthday party, honoring her son, Morris. The children enjoyed candy and games until Mrs. MAXEY called them into the house where they found the birthday cake with candles and ice cream. Those present besides Morris and Lewis MAXEY were: Betty and Doris JOHNSON, Marilyn ALLEN, Evelyn LOVELL, Sammie and Karen JONES, Mr. and Mrs. J.L. BALLANCE, Mrs. Robert LOVELL, and Mrs. J.N. VALLOW.

- On May 1, a quiet wedding was held at the Eden Seminary Chapel at Webster Groves, Mo., when Miss Edith WILSON became the bride of Glen AMBUEHL. Attendants were Thelma AMBUEHL and Elmer HARRIS. The groom is a Seebee in the U.S.N.R., and the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis AMBUEHL of Farina, and has just returned to the states after serving some months in the Aleutian Islands. Upon his return to his duties, he will receive further training in California, and Mrs. AMBUEHL will resume her work in St. Louis. Mrs. AMBUEHL is the second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John WILSON, of Kinmundy, and for sometime employed by McQuay-Norris of St. Louis.

- Last Saturday in the Christian Church in Salem, Clyde MALONE and Miss Louis SHELTON were married. They were attended by Mr. and Mrs. Joseph MALONE, brother and sister-in-law to the groom. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed SHELTON, residing south of Salem. The groom is youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Porter MALONE, residing west of this city. The couple are at home with the groom’s parents where they expect to make their home for the summer at least as Clyde will do the farming due to the ill health of his father.

- An 8 lb. baby girl arrived in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Merle KLINE on May 8.

- Mr. and Mrs. Vernon SINCLAIR of Decatur announce the arrival of Linda Lynette, in the St. Mary’s Hospital Saturday. Mrs. SINCLAIR is the former Lynes RICHERT. This is the first grandchild of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde SINCLAIR and Mr. and Mrs. John RICHERT.

- William Thomas WILKINSON, son of Henry Clay and Harriett WILKINSON, was born on a farm, 4 miles south east of Kinmundy on Jan. 21, 1859, and died at his home in this city a few minutes after midnight, May 8, 1944. He married Prudence I. KENNEDY on Aug. 17, 1882, and they had 7 children, 3 of whom died in infancy. The remaining 4 are: Bert E. of Rockford; Claude of Evansville, Ind.; Pearl W. TELFORD of Salem, and Herschel of West Frankfort. At an early age, he united with the Camp Ground Methodist Church, where he remained a member until moving to Kinmundy, 25 years ago, at which time he transferred his membership to the local church. He leaves his companion of 62 years; 4 children, 12 grandchildren, and 4 great-grandchildren. Services were held from the Methodist Church with interment in Evergreen Cemetery. (A picture accompanied this article.)

- A Commencement Program was printed which will be held at the Kinmundy Gym. Graduates on May 15, 1914 will be: Lois Jean ALEXANDER, William Lee AVERY, Jo P. BARGH, John GARDEN, George E. HALL, Betty HAMMER, William E. HOYT, Peggy Ann JACKSON, Barry Vernon JEZEK, John F. MOTCH, Maxine PERRY, Helen ROBNETT.

- Mr. and Mrs. A.J. JACKSON received a letter from their son, Merle, stating that he arrived safely, somewhere in the Pacific.

- PFC and Mrs. Bill WILSON of Texas, spent last weekend here with relatives and friends.

- Omega: Robert WRIGHT, of the U.S. Navy, is spending his furlough here with Mrs. Nellie WALKINGTON and Mr. and Mrs. Merle WALKINGTON.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. Edwin HARRELL called on Mr. and Mrs. F.S. HARRIS and Mrs. Mary MAYER, Sunday afternoon.

- Sherman: Mrs. A.M. WADE attended the funeral of a nephew, Glen SULLENS at Salem, Friday.

- Sherman: A large crowd gave Pvt. and Mrs. BUSHUE a charivari, Monday night. They left Wednesday for New Jersey to report at camp where he is stationed.

- Sherman: A daughter was born at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond SIGRIST, April 30, named Elizabeth Mae.

- Swift School: Thursday being the last day of school, parents and children gathered Thursday for a farewell dinner for the teacher. The table loaded with good things to eat. All parents and children were present. Miss Phyllis was employed to teach at Swift again next year.

- Swift School: Clyde GARRETT and family and Wiona HANNA spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT and daughter, Donna Mae.

- Swift School: Darrell Gene LIVESAY spent the weekend in Kinmundy with Mrs. Fred GAMMON.

- Swift School: Pvt. Cecil JONES of Wisconsin spent 3 days here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank JONES and wife.

- Meadow Branch: Verne SCHOONOVER left Monday for Great Lakes Training Station where he will get his preliminary training.

- Camp Ground: Chas. FORTNEY has moved from Kinmundy to a log cabin and is spending most of his time fishing. He landed a 4 lb. bass Sunday.

- Camp Ground: Pvt. John SMITH spent 3 weeks at home recently.

- Cpl. Richard BRANSON of Kentucky is spending a 10 day furlough with his wife, Mrs. Mary BRANSON at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Emil MEYER.

- Pleasant Grove: Pvt. Paul SMITH of Kentucky is spending 12 days furlough at the Ralph HEISTAND home.

- Pvt. Bruce OLDEN of South Carolina arrived Saturday to spend furlough with family and friends.

May 18, 1944:

- Here’s a letter from James E. HAMMER, SOM 2 c (Soundman 2 c) who is still floating around on the U.S.S. Heron. He says: I am dropping you a few lines to let you know that I still appreciate the paper and also let you know I am once more on the inside track of the Kinmundy news. I received 11 copies of the paper in 1 bunch and was surprised and thankful to get them. I don’t seem to be able to say enough to let you know how welcome a newspaper from home is. Well it is getting close to chow time and I had better get up and see whether it is sirloin steak or half done beans, the first I hope. Well thanks again for the paper.

- Here’s one from Sgt. James A. BASSETT, who is now in the South Pacific. He says: I have been intending to write, but I just haven’t done it. I hope you will be kind enough to excuse me for not writing before. But you know how easy it is to put off writing. I hope this finds everyone around the old home town is in good health, especially around the editorial mansion. I still get the paper and I want you to know how much I appreciate it. I don’t get them as often or as soon as I would like to, but I get them and that is the main thing. There are a lot of things in the paper that I wouldn’t know if I didn’t read it there. Maybe you knew, or perhaps you didn’t that Harold was a buddy of mine. He and I were inducted at the same time and had always been in the same company until he was sent home. You probably heard Guin speak of him. I hear from him about once a month. As you know I have been in the South and Southwest Pacific for the past 2 years and I am getting enough of it. Did I say getting? I have gotten enough of it a long time ago. I used to think it would be nice to be where it never snows, but I don’t think so anymore. I think it would be nice to wallow in a nice deep snow drift. But things could be a lot worse. We have a movie every other night. So you see we have some recreation. I will bring this to a close before I bore you with this nonsense.

- On May 11 in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Will EAGAN occurred the wedding of Mrs. Charlene HENSLEY and James EAGAN, both of this city. The couple will make their home in Kinmundy. Mr. EAGAN for several years has been employed by the late P.F. ROBNETT.

- On May 13 occurred the wedding of Mrs. Minnie EASLEY of Salem, and Clark COCKRELL, formerly of this city. Mrs. COCKRELL is a teacher of the Marion County rural schools. Mr. COCKRELL taught a rural school in Clay County last winter and is employed to teach in the Edgewood, Ill. High School this coming winter. The couple will reside in Salem.

- Memorial Services will be held at Sandy Branch on Sunday, May 8, at 2 o’clock p.m. Judge O.A. JAMES of Salem will deliver the address. Every body welcome. W.L. GREEN, Chairman.

- Mr. and Mrs. Chas. GAMMON have received word from their son, T. Sgt. Rex GAMMON stating that he is now in India.

- W.W. LOWE has received a handsome picture of his grandson, Warren Eugene LOWE, the second son of Mr. and Mrs. Jim LOWE, of California. Warren Eugene has graduated from Annapolis Naval Academy as an Ensign and is now on duty.

- PFC Darrell REESE has returned to his camp in North Carolina.

- Mr. and Mrs. Cecil BAILEY had all their children with them for Mother’s Day except their son, Lloyd, who is serving as a paratrooper overseas.

- Mr. and Mrs. Tom HELPINGSTINE and family of South Bend, Ind. arrived Sunday with their household goods and are now domiciled in their farm home in the Swift neighborhood.

- James H. SIPES from Kinmundy is in a 10 week course at the San Antonio Aviation Cadet Center, for future pilots, bombardiers, and navigators.

- RENO Not Guilty: Joe RENO was arraigned in the Circuit Court Monday and the court found him not guilty and set him free. He left immediately after the trial for the northern part of the state to visit relatives.

- Mrs. Josephine JONES GREEN, widow of John W. GREEN, formerly of Farina, died in the home of her daughter, Mrs. J.H. DISS, Monday. She has been bedfast for a year. She is survived by the following children: Mrs. J.H. DISS, PFC James GREEN of Texas, Mrs. Arthur GILBERT of Baraboo, Wis., and Mary Joe GREEN of Lincoln, Ill. The following brothers and sisters: G. Frank JONES of Kinmundy, Ed JONES of Borger, Texas, Miss Nell JONES of Oklahoma City, Okla.; Mrs. Rena CROSLEY of Denver, Colo., and Mrs. Marlin DISS of Hooper, Colo. Services were held from the S.B. Church of Farina with interment in Farina Cemetery.

- An oil well, known was the COPPLE No. 1, is being drilled. It is located on what is known as the Smith CONANT land east of this city.

- An Army Airplane crashed 3˝ miles north of Kinmundy Monday damaging the plane considerably and with a few minor injuries being sustained by the pilot, the worst being a broken nose. The plane was enroute from Scott Field to Ohio. It crashed in the woods just west of the Glen JARHAUS home. The pilot crawled out of the plane and went to the JARHAUS home where he phoned Scott Field.

- A promotion to the rank of fireman first class came to Blue Jacket, Lyle F. SWIFT, son of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond E. SWIFT, R.R. 3 Kinmundy during the recent graduation ceremonies at the Naval Academy School at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas. The study included the use, function and maintenance of all electric tools used by the Navy.

- Sgt. and Mrs. Loren EAGAN and 2 children from Missouri came Sunday for a visit with Mr. and Mrs. B.F. LINTON.

- East Meadow Branch: Anne SLOVICK S1 c N.A.S. of Glenview, Ill. came Saturday night and spent Mother’s Day with her mother, Mrs. Mary SLOVICK.

- East Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Dale HAMMER and children of Sumner had Sunday evening supper with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.F. ROBB.

- East Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Tom BALLANCE, and Mr. and Mrs. Bert GARRETT called on Mr. and Mrs. W.F. ROBB Monday night.

- Sgt. John D. PURCELL has been home for a 10 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Dwight PURCELL and family in Alma. Sgt. PURCELL will depart Saturday for Army duties in California.

- Pvt. Harvey HEADLEY of Chicago has been visiting relatives here.

- Pleasant Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Clyde HIESTAND attended the wedding of Mrs. Minnie EASLEY and Clark COCKRELL, which occurred Sunday at the home of the bride.

May 25, 1944:

- Here’s a letter from Cpl. Christy E. GENTRY, who is now in the Hawaiian Islands. He says: I’ve been over in the Hawaiian Islands for 9 months, so I think it is about time for me to give you my address which is slightly changed from the one I had in the desert. I told Dad to tell you it was changed but I suppose he forgot to tell you as it is still addressed the old way. I think you know the paper is very much appreciated. Quite a bit of it contains articles that are of interest to me. And then comes wedding announcements of a lot of my friends. Some are quite a surprise to me as I didn’t expect that Cupid was working on them. So far I’ve escaped the little fellows’ arrows. I guess my skin is a bit to tough, anyway they have trouble sticking a needle in my arm. Isn’t there some way you could put a little more about church activities, especially the Methodist. I would like to know more of how services at home are getting along. My church activities have been with the Salvation Army since I have been over here. It may seem strange to you and it did to me, there isn’t a Methodist Church on the Island I am stationed on. Our chaplain is a Methodist but that is the closest. I have more to say for the Salvation Army and there are plenty more soldiers that will back me up. Besides the Church services which was my best interest, they also operate a canteen route on which they take coffee and doughnuts to the guard posts at night. The time spent on these routes are their time which they could use elsewhere. The soldiers on guard greatly appreciate this during the night. Perhaps you think hot coffee and Hawaii doesn’t go together, but a lot of the nights get cool enough till I have wished more than once that I had another blanket besides the two I have and we have a mattress under us. And troops that are in action in the South Pacific can and will tell you that they get this service there. Sometimes the Salvation Army Officer gets in some dangerous places while passing out the coffee and words of cheer. Their Red Shield U.S.O. clubs are all over, even in New Guinea, and the ones back home seem to be the most popular of all the U.S.O.’s with the army boys. The reason I’ve said this is because I get mad when I read how much the Red Cross is doing and yet I don’t even see what they do nor in talking with others do I hear about it. The Salvation Army is doing as much or more for us service men than the Red Cross but they don’t get credit for it in paper. Most any serviceman who has been across will tell you the Salvation Army has done more than the Red Cross, soldiers from both wars. So I wonder why you newspaper men don’t mention the work of the Salvation Army as well as the Red Cross. They deserve it as their money comes from donations too. Enough for that. I’ve saw John (Bill) McCULLEY a couple of times but I don’t think he recognized me and I didn’t have time to stop him. I sport a mustache on my lip which must change my appearance. How is Guin getting along? I’d better quit for now, maybe I’ll get enough ambition to write again.

- Here’s one from Paul PARRISH SC 2 c who is still floating around on the U.S.S. Pelias. He says: Thought I would drop a few lines to the old home town as I am so far away "Somewhere in Australia" that it might be sometime before I have a chance to visit it and old friends again. Life in the Navy agrees with me 100 percent. I am doing a little cooking, only a good many hundreds of men to feed 3 times a day. It’s quite a trick to do a good job, especially when the seas get to running high and the ship rolling. We had a great "Neptune Party" on crossing the equator and officially documented by Neptune’s Pex. I am now a fullfledged shellback entitled to all the privileges that goes with it in Neptune’s Realm throughout the world. I trust this finds all my old friends enjoying the best of health and not getting too much of a hitch in the pants because of rationing.

- Here’s one Cpl. Earl BRIMBERRY, who is stationed in New Guinea. He says: Just a few lines to say ‘hello’ and to inform you of a change in my APO. It seems the army has more post offices than anything else. I trust you all are in the pink of health. I guess I have been lucky so far. Everything here is as usual and you can read as much as I could write it. I have been getting the paper in bunches and its quite awhile between bunches too, but they are still news to me or at least most of it. We are camped on a beautiful hill which the Aussies fought bitterly for. Its not uncommon to find a dead Jap or 2 the boys forgot. You’ll have to pardon the writing as we write on most anything we can find. Well the rain has started again so I’ll close and try to keep myself half dry.

- Here’s one from PFC Derrill STIPP, who has seen plenty of action and has been in a hospital in North Africa. He says: Well, I haven’t received your paper for almost 4 months and am not getting very good news or I mean I haven’t got to read any of the boys letters that is on the account I had to go to the hospital the 21st of February and my mail has been held up or misplaced. I suppose I will get it one of these days, hope so any way. Well, here’s to you guys up there in Alaska, in England, Ireland, Africa, Sicily, India, China, and all of the South Pacific Islands and where ever you may be. I spent almost 4 months last winter where it was hell. And I went to the hospital for arthritis and I mean I had it bad, and I might have a little touch of psychoneurosis. I mean when a man has shells bursting around him and artillery fire constantly that long it finally gets him. Say, DEWEESE, how is everything where you are. I bet you had a nice long winter, ha. I sure have been homesick. I have been across for 13 months and all but the last 3 months have been heck. As I started to say I was in the hospital for one month, lacking a day or two, and I have been in this camp for 60 days. I have had a few good days since I have been here. Then I was in the hospital they gave me my Africa ribbon and 2 bronze stars, one for Sicily and one for Africa. They have put me in B-2, that is limited assignment which should not be so bad for me now, as I am pretty badly bummed up in the back and legs. I sure miss the paper for I sure do like to read here the boys are getting furloughs, something I haven’t been able to get since I have been in the army and that is over 2 years. I guess it is just tough luck, but haven’t got any bad time so far. I was restricted to the Battery for awhile in Africa for getting left at a picture show, which I stayed in all night and if I tried long enough I could have got back. There was another guy with me and I couldn’t blame the Company Commander at all. I haven’t or can’t think of anything else to write so will close.

- Mrs. Eliza GENTRY received word yesterday that the body of her grandson, Lt. Fred GENTRY, had been found in Colorado. While on a training flight in February of this year, the plane and it’s crew were reported missing. The body of the young flight officer is being returned to his home in Decatur for burial. He is survived by his wife and parents, several brothers and sisters and other relatives. Mrs. GENTRY left Tuesday for Decatur to attend the funeral.

- Just as we expected, the COPPLE No. 1 oil well has been pronounced dry and it will be plugged today. It just seems as though they can’t find the black gold in these parts.

- Mr. and Mrs. Thurman GENTRY of Salem have purchased the Sadie SEE property and will make Kinmundy their future home with their 2 children. Mrs. GENTRY was formerly Marjorie LEMAY, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alf LEMAY.

- Mary Josephine JONES GREEN, the 4th of 8 children born to James and Mahala FOSTER JONES, was born Dec. 26, 1877 in Marion Co., Ill., and died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J.H. DISS in Kinmundy on May 15, 1944. With the exception of 2 years spent in St. Louis, Mo. and Dixon, Ill., her early life was spent with her parents west of Kinmundy. On New Year’s Eve, 1907, she married John Wesley GREEN, of Farina, and they had 4 children: Alta, James, Ruth, and Mary Jo. Early in life she joined the Shanghai Methodist Church. After her marriage she joined the Seventh Day Baptist Church. She is survived by her children: Mrs. J.H. DISS of Kinmundy; James W. GREEN of McKinney, Texas; Mrs. A.M. GILBERT of Baraboo, Wis.; and Mary Jo GREEN of Lincoln, Ill. Three sisters: Miss Nell JONES of Oklahoma City, Okla.; Mrs. Rena CROSLEY of Boulder, Colo.; and Mrs. Marlin DISS of Hopper, Colo. Two brothers: Frank of Kinmundy, and Ed JONES of Borger, Texas. Five grandchildren: Keith and Loretta DISS, Roberta and Mary GILBERT, and Ruth Ann GREEN.

- The Program which will be held at Evergreen Cemetery in honor of Decoration Day, May 30, sponsored by the American Legion, was printed.

- The High School Graduation Program was printed with the following names as graduates: George Holbrook BARGH, Jr.; Virginia Jane PURSELL, Frances Maurine MULVANEY, Norma I. SULLENS, William M. BROOM, Jeanne UNDERWOOD, Russell Leon JONES, Betty Jane WILLIAMS, Darrell Floyd JONES, Phillip Mac OWEN, Leonard Merl GOODIN, Duane Jackson HANNA, John E. PIPER, Velma E. EDWARDS, Leah Pearl WALTON, Pleasant Harvey ROBNETT, Zella E. SCHOONOVER, Kathleen BROWN, Virginia Ann KEEN, Ellen Virginia BASSETT, Maxine PURCELL, Doris Rose SMITH, Ruth Edna SHAFFER, Helen M. SINCLAIR, Ira Clarence GAMMON, Stella Mae SINCLAIR, A. Jackson JENKINS, and in the service: Victor Ernest YATES, Charles Lee DOOLEN, and Kenneth E. PIGG.

- Mr. and Mrs. W.S. PRUETT returned home Friday after spending a few days in Alma, Mich., with Lt (jg) and Mrs. Carl E. PRUETT.

- Miss Annie DILLON attended the funeral of Dennie SWITZER in Farina Sunday afternoon.

- Mr. and Mrs. W.S. PRUETT returned home Friday after spending a few days in Alma, Mich., with Lt. (jg) and Mrs. Carl E. PRUETT.

- Prairie Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Donald MARLOW attended the baccalaureate services in Farina Sunday, their son, William, being one of the graduates. Other graduates from this community are Jerry and Imogene McCARTY and Helen ERNST.

- Pleasant Grove: Pvt. Roy MILLER of Scott Field spent Saturday night with his wife and children.

- Pleasant Grove: Pvt. and Mrs. Russell SHAFFER of Michigan and his mother, Mrs. Gertie BARRALL spent Wednesday with Pearl ROSE and family. Mr. and Mrs. Ralph ROSE and Mr. and Mrs. Herschel ROSE and children were dinner guests also, as Ralph and Herschel were helping in the field.

- Swift School: Mrs. Clyde BASSETT and daughter, Helen, spent Sunday afternoon at the Clyde GARRETT home.

- Swift School: Evelyn BASSETT spent Sunday with Wiona HANNA.

- Swift School: Callers at the R.H. GREEN home Tuesday were: Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT and daughter, Donna Mae, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. COLE and daughter, Joan, and Claude HANNA and family.

- Swift School: Leroy GREEN leaves for Chicago Monday where he will be inducted into the Navy.

- Swift School: Kenneth ROBB and family spent Sunday in Kinmundy at the Bert GARRETT home.

- Omega: Jewel LUTTREL of the U.S. Army is spending his furlough with his parents in the Brown School District.

- Several from here attended the funeral of Dennie SWITZER in Farina, Sunday. He died at the Mark Greer Hospital in Vandalia from a cerebral hemorrhage.

- Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Ira MARSHALL had word last week that their son, Virgil, has been made Welfare Officer of Whiting Field, where he’s stationed.

- PFC Laverne (Pete) KEEN, M.P., has returned to Michigan after a week furlough here with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene KEEN.

- We are glad to report the condition of Master Sammie JONES improving after 2 attacks of pneumonia. He is responding to a series of x-ray treatments.

- PFC and Mrs. James GREEN and daughter, Ruth Ann, departed Tuesday for camp in Texas. James has been able to spend the last 2 weeks with his mother who died last Monday.

- Ensign and Mrs. Arthur and GILBERT returned Wednesday to their home in Baraboo, Wis.

- Mrs. Elizabeth ATKINS is in Hartford, Ill. visiting in the home of her daughter, Mr. and Mrs. J.H. BACKENSTO. Mrs. ATKINS accompanied Miss Martha WALKER and mother, Mrs. Mary WALKER home, after they visited with relatives here and in the Jones School District. Mrs. ATKINS will return Memorial Day.

June 1, 1944:

- Here’s a short letter from Pvt. Charles JENKINS, who is stationed in North Carolina. He says: As it has been quite some time since I last wrote, I figured I had better try and sling a little ink your way and once again thank you for your welcome paper. I receive it regularly each week. I certainly enjoy reading the letters from the different fellows in the service. They sure are scattered now. I am sending you one of our division papers "The Thirteener", of the Thirteeneth Airborne Division. Hope you will enjoy reading it, although it has quite a lot of foolishness in it. Will close now, so please excuse the mistakes and errors. Here’s hoping this fracus soon ends for the benefit of all concerned. Thanks again for the Express.

- Here’s one from Sgt. Delbert HAMMER, who is stationed in California. He says: I have no excuse for not thanking you for the paper before, although I have appreciated your generosity to the fullest extent. So thank you very much and I have really enjoyed reading the Kinmundy paper, especially when I was in the Aleutian Islands and interior of Alaska. I will say a person does not have to overseas to enjoy the Kinmundy paper. Also I believe you are right in asking the people of Kinmundy to share your burden of sending the paper to the boys and girls in the service. As long as we have boys and girls overseas fighting to save this country from destruction and slavery, the least the people of Kinmundy can do to show their appreciation is send them the paper. There are now 327 men and women from Kinmundy in the service and I sincerely believe there should be 327 subscribers for the paper. Most of the people of the U.S.A. still do not realize the horrors of war and that the war is still going on. They also have the phoney belief the war is practically over. I say the war has just begun for us and we are barely in the second phase of fighting. I realize the war is going on as I have seen some action myself and have lost at least 20 buddies so far. We will win, but it will take a long time yet, and we will also lose an enormous amount of men and women before it is won. I wish to thank the blood donors of Kinmundy for the swell job they are doing in saving the lives of some Mother’s son or daughter in the service. Although giving blood is strictly voluntary, I believe you people should be credited for it. To the men and women going overseas now, and to those going over in the future, I say "give them hell". So again I thank you sincerely for the paper.

- Jefferson D. BARBEE was born in Marion Co., Ill. on Sept. 21, 1861, the son of Joseph and Mauda ROCKHOLD BARBEE. He was the last of his family, and 6 brothers and 1 sister preceded him in death. Mr. BARBEE was married to Eliza GRAY on March 10, 1881 and they had 8 children: Lillie of Kinmundy; Clarence of Urbana; John of Champaign; Floyd of Centralia; Lela of Laclede; Clara, Altha, and Cora who preceded him in death. He also leaves 18 grandchildren, and 12 great-grandchildren. He joined the Presbyterian Church when a young man. After an illness of several months, he died on May 26, 1944. Services were held from the Christian Church with interment in Evergreen Cemetery.

- The following men have been accepted for service in the armed forces: Dale BRASEL of Salem, Wm. BROOM, Raymond DOUDERA, and Harold JONES of Alma; Frederick MISELBROOK, Ray BOUGHERS, Jason GOODWIN, Francis KRUTSINGER, and Walter BRIMBERRY, of Kinmundy.

- Lt. Lyle GREEN left California Monday at 3 p.m landed at Scott Field on Tuesday at 5 p.m. on a trip to Indiana. He spent Tuesday night with his father and family, leaving for Indiana early Wednesday.

- Mrs. Kate BOUGHERS fell in her home last week and suffered a broken right wrist.

- The Annual Kinmundy High School Alumni reception and banquet for the graduating class was held at the Gym Saturday evening with a potluck dinner. In the absence of the President, Miss Donna MAULDING, the Vice President, Miss Katherine WORMLEY assumed charge.

- Sgt. Carl GREEN of Calif. is here visiting his father, Will GREEN and family.

- Pvt. Bill HILL is home from Ky. with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harley HILL.

- The 4-H Club met Wednesday afternoon, May 24th at the home of our leader, Mrs. Mildred HANNA. Eleven were present. Mrs. Mary McMACKIN of Salem, a guest, made a very interesting talk and explained the club work. Officers were elected. A name has not been chosen as yet for our club. Doughnuts were served after which outdoor games were played. The next meeting will be at the home of our leader, Wednesday, June 7th. Evelyn BASSETT, Reporter.

- Wilson School: Mr. and Mrs. Fred KLEISS and daughter, Mildred and Helen, were supper guests of Miss Anna KOLB last Tuesday, honoring both Anna’s and Mildred’s birthdays.

- Wilson School: A family reunion was held last Wednesday at the J.T. CHARLTON home in honor of Mrs. Ann WIRES of Villa Grove. A delicious dinner served to Mr. and Mrs. John CHARLTON, Mrs. Wilford SNELLING and family, and Jess CHARLTON.

- Pleasant Grove: A wiener roast was enjoyed last Tuesday night at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jack BARKSDALE by the Bee Branch Sunday School folks.

- Pleasant Grove: Pvt. Roy MILLER of Scott Field spent the weekend with his family.

- Pleasant Grove: Several from here attended the party at the Herschel ROSE home Wednesday night given for her brother, Bud CHAPMAN, who will leave soon to go to into the Armed Forces.

- Swift School: Leroy GREEN has been sent to Great Lakes Training Station for his Naval Training.

- Swift School: Mrs. Harold ROBB of Cal. came Monday for a visit with her parents, Marvin CONANT and family.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth ROBB assisted Bert GARRETT and family move on Monday afternoon.

- Swift School: Nearly everyone from this vicinity attended Decoration Services at Sandy Branch Sunday afternoon.

- Pvt. Clifton LEMAY of Camp Robinson is spending his furlough here with his wife and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred LEMAY.

- Mr. and Mrs. Orville DISS received a letter from their son, Pvt. Charles, at Camp Bowie, in which he told them he had spent last Sunday with Sgt. and Mrs. Beryl DISS at Camp Howze.

- PFC Mark ARNOLD of Michigan is enjoying his furlough with his wife and daughter and other relatives.

- Miss Pearl ARNOLD of Springfield is visiting a few days with her mother, Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD and Miss Ruby.

June 8, 1944:

- Here’s a nice letter from Sgt. Maxey SPENCER, who is doing a little work around an air field in Idaho. He says: I have been intending to write you for quite some time, telling you how much I enjoy the paper, but due to my moving around so often I have never had time. I received the last 2 copies today and was very glad to receive them as usual. There isn’t much to tell about my job in the army. I am just the Aerial Engineer on a B-24. I have a nice crew to work with. They are from all over the United States. When we complete our training here, we will be sent overseas into combat. This is a very beautiful country with lots of snowcapped mountain streams. I think most of the people from home would enjoy seeing it. The southern states as Texas, Mississippi, Florida and Georgia, couldn’t compare with it. This is supposed to be a potato country but I haven’t tasted any that were better than those in Illinois. All I have seen here was sheep and cattle and a patch of corn. All the fields are irrigated here from mountain streams. The city of Boise is very nice being the capitol city of Idaho. The people here treat the soldiers very nice. We are about 8 miles from town, but it doesn’t look over a mile. I enjoy reading the Zatso column and the letters from the boys in the service. I had better close now as it is time for lights out and tomorrow will come too soon. Tell all the people back home ‘hello’ for me and thanks again for the paper.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Charles JASPER, who is mingling with the Chinks over in China. He says: Just thought I would drop you a few lines again and thank you for your trouble of sending the paper to me and to tell you that I am still receiving them. Most of the boys have written you 2 or 3 times and I really enjoy their letters, so I thought they might like one from China. I have been here in China now for about 7 months and I still don’t know much more about the place than I did when I wrote the first time. I got to go on a sight seeing tour awhile back, which proved to be very interesting, but a couple of the boys and myself were a little too venturesome and didn’t stay with the guide so everything wasn’t explained to us. I know what I seen but I don’t know what is was all about. Our first stop was a war plant out in the mountains and just to look at this place you would think all they could make would be straw hats or baskets. We really got a surprise though when we got in the plant because they had modern machinery just like our own. Of course, the plant was scattered among small buildings and part of it was in caves and not in one huge building. A lot of their machines were set right on the ground and in the caves there was no floor at all, only dirt and rock. I saw one machine in one of the caves that made small brass gears and there was a 16 year old Chinese boy at the controls. The machine was several times as big as he was but he knew every part of it. We all thought we would see a lot of crude equipment before we got to the plant, but we sure got a big surprise. We made 2 more stops on our tour after we left the plant where we also ate our dinner in Chinese style and beat our brains out trying to use chop sticks. One of our stops after the plant was some temples and the "Black Dragon Pool". This place was at the foot of a mountain and then the temples ran clear to the top. The Black Dragon Pool was just a small pool of very clear water with loads of fish, big and small. From the Pool there were stone steps leading up the side of the mountain to the temples. You go in one temple out of the other side to more steps leading up to more temples. After the temple we went to a laboratory where they were experimenting on different things, were too deep for me and they also ground lens for microscopes. I didn’t look around very much here because I was getting pretty tired after working all night and climbing up and down from the temples. I went back to the truck to rest while the others had tea with the Chinese. From there we had to go back to camp because it was time for chow and most of us were too tired to go anyplace. We had one more place to go to which was the "Copper Temples", but when the guide ask which it would be, the Temples or back to camp, and vote was back to camp. The trip was a lot more interesting than we all thought it would be and the first chance I get I want to make the trip again, but not when I have worked the night before. Just take my word for it, don’t come to China to see this stuff, because it isn’t worth it when you can see it in the movies back home. As for the rest of China, it is all the same as far as I know and the war still goes on. All of the boys over here are just waiting and hoping for the day when they can start home and every time they read about a strike back in the States, they say "send them gold bricks from over here for 6 months and they won’t strike again". If they had to come over here and work for $50 bucks a month, do without mail for a week or two at a time, and eat eggs when your grub runs short, then they would know how lucky they really are. You might say we would like to have some eggs and we would too, if half of them were not rotten. Now don’t get me wrong that we have eggs all the time 3 times a day, because we don’t, but some times when the grub runs low and they can’t get meat, we have eggs for a week or two. Most of the time our meals are good and we have swell quarters to live in. We have barracks which are divided into 6 rooms and 6 men to a room. We have double decked beds, which are pretty good only once in a while the man on top falls through as happened in our room a few nights back. We have a locker per man for our clothes and 2 dressers with a large drawer and a small one for shaving articles and other things you might have to put in them. We get our laundry done free by the Chinese and have house boys who make our bed and clean up the rooms. We have to drink bottled water, so the house boys get our water for us in our canteens. They also fix the holes and tears in our clothes or mosquito nets for a small charge of a few dollars in Chinese money. Of course, all GIs in China don’t have this nice a set up, but we were just lucky when we were assigned to this job and it sure beats driving trucks. I look to be back on trucks before we get back to the States, but I hope our time is up overseas before we do as driving over here on these roads is a man killer. Well, Mr. VALLOW, I have written about all there is to tell about this place and from the looks of the pages I have written enough. If I write any more I will have to sign my name a author. I hope this explains to you a little on how we live over here. We really have it soft although we have to work pretty hard sometimes only right now that the Monsoon season is on, we have it soft all the way around. I will close now before I think of something else, so will thank you again for the paper which I enjoy very much.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Charles MEYER, who is stationed in Maryland. He says: As I haven’t written you in some time I’ll try and let you know I am still thinking of everyone. I haven’t gotten the paper in some time now, but I hope to get it any day now. I’ve been shifting around so much that it is pretty hard for me to let you know my address. Tell everyone I said ‘hello and good luck and God Bless everyone.’ This camp isn’t so bad except for the heat. It gets pretty hot down here. I sure wish I was a little closer to home so I could come home every once in awhile. Well I hear the chow whistle blowing so I guess I’ll have to close and go eat. So long, and best of luck to everyone.

- Here’s one from S. Sgt. Clouris STIPP, who is also working at an air field down in Texas. He says: I’ve been getting your paper for about 2 years now and I haven’t written to you thanking your for the paper. I don’t know how to thank you, for we get a kick reading the letters the boys write. We enjoy it. I think that the boys are doing a wonderful job over there and I wish I could be with them. I have wanted to go overseas for about 2 years, but for some reason, they are keeping me here. I am down here in Texas with all the dust and the wind. I just read a letter that my brother wrote and I got a kick from the way he was talking, but I guess that he can take it. I have trained a lot of boys for overseas duty. I couldn’t say how many, but a lot of them I spent 22 months with in Utah. It was plenty rough. We took hikes every other day of about 27 miles. The boys liked it but they did a lot of moaning. Some of the boys get it rough and some don’t, but some day it will all be over and we can come home. Then we can talk about what we have gone thru with and can go back to our jobs and settle down again, I hope. I will thank you again for the paper and a lot of luck to all of you on the home front.

- Here’s a V-Mail from Cpl. Louie SOUTIER, which was written some where in England. He says: Well, I guess I will at last write you a letter to let you know I am still getting the paper. I get it pretty regularly and I am sure glad of it as you don’t get much news over here. Well, am getting along fine and am pretty busy now. We work seven days a week and a lot at night, so don’t have time to go much. It don’t get dark here until 11 at night and gets light at 5 now. So most of the time is spent in daylight. I like to read the letters the other boys write. I see where a lot of them are over here, but as yet, I have never seen anybody that I knew. Well, I guess I had better sign off for now.

- Charles GRAY, son of Professor and Mrs. H.M. GRAY, 505 West Delaware, Urbana, has received a summer session scholarship to Phillips Andover, Mass. He went there for an 8 week session. He is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. E.W. DOOLEN, the son of their daughter, Gene.

- Mrs. Jane ALTVATER died Tuesday in her home west of Salem after an illness of 6 months at the age of 73 years. She was the former Jane WALKINGTON of Redlick Prairie District. She was married to Fred ALVATER, who survives, and they had 1 son, Kerron, now with the Air Force stationed in Panama. He obtained leave of absence and returned home for the last illness and death of his mother. She is also survived by a brother, Aaron WALKINGTON, of Michigan, the last of a family of 11 children. Services were held from McMackin funeral home with interment in Evergreen Cemetery.

- Billie, the 7 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred BOYD, sustained a head injury yesterday by falling from a car on to the hard road just west of Salem. He was rushed to Salem Hospital where he is in serious condition. Mrs. BOYD and children accompanied Mrs. A.J. JACKSON and daughter, Martha, to Salem. While the JACKSONs were transacting business in Salem, Mrs. BOYD and children drove out to the oil field on a business mission. In returning to Salem, the boy, who was riding in the backseat, remarked that the door wasn’t closed and attempted to close it. In opening it, he was jerked out of the car onto the pavement. He regained consciousness at 3 o’clock this morning.

- GARRETT-SHREFFLER Wedding: Miss Norma GARRETT, of Kinmundy, and Pvt. Edwin SHREFFLER of Fort Jackson, formerly of Alma, were united in marriage at 1:00 o’clock Monday afternoon, May 22, in the Methodist parsonage at Columbia, South Carolina the single ring ceremony was performed by Rev. Major. The bride wore light blue with black accessories. The groom was attired in the regulation uniform of the United States Army. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bert GARRETT, of Kinmundy. She was graduated from the Kinmundy High School with the class of 1943, and has been employed in Lansing, Mich. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Gordon SHREFFLER of Alma. He was graduated from the Salem High School with the class of 1940. He attended the St. Louis School of Aeronautics. He entered the United States Army in October 1942, and is now located at Ft. Jackson. They are now at home at 849 Tyron St., Columbia, S.C.

- The fifth war loan is now on. Let’s do it again and meet our quota on the 5th war bond load of $45,000 for Kinmundy twp.

- On Monday, word was received that Dr. DOUGHERTY of Farina died. This family came to Kinmundy from Neoga about 11 years ago and made many friends here. About 4 years ago they moved to Farina. Dr. DOUGHERTY though not living here was a caller almost every day in his professional duties, and called on a patient Sunday night. For some time he was a sufferer of heart trouble. He is survived by his wife, and 2 children: Eileen of Washington, D.C., and Mac in the U.S. Navy. The body was brought here to Linton Funeral Home and short services held in the home in Farina and at Neoga. Interment was made in Neoga Cemetery.

- In Memory of Jefferson BARBEE who died May 26, 1944. A list of those from out-of-town attending the services was included.

- PFC and Mrs. Roy DAVIS have a daughter born June 4 named Nancy Lynn.

- Mrs. Gladys EAGAN suffered a painful accident Saturday afternoon, while she and her daughter, Mrs. Tiona BLAIR, were setting in the porch swing. The hook that held the swing chains broke letting the ladies fall and Mrs. EAGAN’s right leg was broken, a compound fracture, just above the ankle. Mrs. E.O. ZIMMER rushed her to the Salem hospital and she is as well as can be expected.

- Mr. and Mrs. John BORING have received word that their 2 sons, Bk 2 c John and Pr 1 c Joe, met on April 12 somewhere in the southwest Pacific. Needless to say they had a good time together.

- F2 c and Mrs. Frank ZINZER and baby daughter, Frances, of Chicago, are spending his leave here with Mr. and Mrs. Verchial TROUT.

- Mrs. Robert OLSTERHOLZ and children have moved into the ROONEY property owned by F.G. ALEXANDER, in the north part of town. They will make this their home while Mr. OSTERHOLZ is in the Navy. He has completed his boot training and has been spending his leave here with his family, returning to his camp on Monday.

- S2 c Dick GRAY is home from boot training at Great Lakes.

- Pleasant Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Melvin CURRY of Brubaker announce the arrival of a little daughter, born Wednesday in the Salem Hospital. Mary Ruth is the name chosen for the little lady.

- Pleasant Grove: The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dwight CURRY has been seriously ill in Salem Hospital, she having undergone an operation for appendicitis, but is reported to be improving after the second operation.

- Pvt. Grover VETETO of Texas enjoyed furlough with his wife and baby.

- Green Ridge: PFC Louie DOUDERA returned to his camp in Texas last Tuesday after spending a 14 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. F.L. DOUDERA.

- Green Ridge: There were 74 who attended a party for Louie DOUDERA, who was home on furlough, and Raymond, who is leaving for the army.

- Meacham: Mrs. Dora HEICHER received a message telling of the arrival of a little daughter to Mr. and Mrs. Harold ALLEN in the hospital in Elmhurst, Ill. The mother is formerly Miss Geneva HEICHER.

- East Zion: Mrs. Nellie Fern BASSETT has been spending a few days at the James BASSETT home.

- East Meadow Branch: Mrs. W.F. ROBB accompanied her son-in-law and daughter to their home in Sumner, Thursday, and returned home Sunday evening.

- East Meadow Branch: Mrs. W.F. ROBB went to Salem Monday of last week to meet her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Harold ROBB, who had returned from California.

- East Meadow Branch: Mrs. Hazel LIVESAY and Mrs. Irene GAMMON called on Mrs. W.F. ROBB Thursday morning.

June 15, 1944:

- Our whole community received a shock Friday evening when the following telegram was received by Mrs. George JOHNSON: "The Secretary of the War desires me to express his deepest regret that your husband, Major George A. JOHNSON, was killed in action on the 25th day of May in Italy. Letter follows. The Adjutant General". Yes, we were all shocked immensely. This was Kinmundy’s first death in the war. How we have escaped thus far has been nothing more than a miracle. Every person in the community felt this shock and are sympathizing with the bereaved family for every family has some boy or girl participating in this war and they know not when they might receive a like message from the War or Navy Department. We claimed Major JOHNSON as one of our boys because he moved his family here just before he was called into service. And this has been his home ever since. Though, there are 2 other communities which can lay claim to him namely Harrisburg, where he was reared, and Windsor, where he taught school preceding his induction. Nevertheless, he was a good soldier and all these communities are mighty proud to claim him. George, the son of Mr. and Mrs. W.T. JOHNSON, was born in Saline Co. on March 21, 1912, and died at the age of 32 years, 2 months, and 1 day. He graduated from the Harrisburg High School with the class of ‘30, and graduated with honors from the University of Illinois with the class of ‘35. He taught a year in Vocational Agriculture at McNabb, Ill., and 5 terms at the schools in Windsor in a like position until he was called into service. On June 3, 1935 he married Miss Lucille INGRAM of this city, and they had 3 children: Jimmy 8, Nancy 6, and Joyce 4. While attending the U. of I. he enrolled in Reserve Officers Training and upon graduation was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army Reserves. In 1939 he was elevated to the Rank of First Lieutenant. He was called to duty on March 28, 1941, and left for overseas on May 10, 1942 landing in Ireland. From there, he was sent to Africa and then to Italy. He was advanced to Captain in Dec. 1942, and to Major in July 1943. He had been in the thick of the fighting in North Africa and then in Italy. While serving in the Tunisian Front he was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action. During the period of Jan. 21 to 24, 1943, he distinguished himself in action against an armed enemy, and led his company against the enemy contributed much to the success of the operation. On one occasion, the example he set was by firing at an enemy tank after he had to borrow ammunition from another vehicle gave his men the inspiration to carry the engagement to a successful conclusion. It was during this campaign that he received a citation for exceptional and meritorious service. In May 1943 he received a wound in the right hand from a shell fragment which sent him to a hospital for a week. On May 9, 1943, he received another citation and the following month received the Purple Heart. Major JOHNSON was rather fortunate in having a brother, 1st Lt. Joseph JOHNSON, in his regiment, and although they were several miles apart, they did manage to see one another quite often. Another brother, 1st Lt. Robert JOHNSON is with the Army Air Corps in New Guinea. Three brothers-in-law are also in the service, namely Lt. Col. William C. INGRAM, Army Air Corps, stationed in Idaho; Ray H. INGRAM, Ph 1 c, U.S.N., now stationed in Casa Blanca; and Louis C. INGRAM, Ph 2 c at the present time a patient in a hospital in Long Island. Besides the immediate family and the 2 brothers, he leaves his parents, who are living in Beltsville, Md., 2 brothers, Cressie at home, and Dan, also of Boltsville, and 1 sister, Verda, a nurse in the Garfield Hospital, Washington, D.C. Truly, this man was a soldier, giving his last full measure of devotion for his country. And we feel as though he did not die in vain. He was a good Christian man. Although, he retained his membership in the Ledford Baptist Church of Harrisburg, he was always more than willing to work along side of his faithful companion in any church or community in which he resided. Memorial Services will be held in Kinmundy High School June 25th. (A picture accompanied this article.)

- Dick GEORGE, 81, of Odin, died in his home Sunday from a lingering illness of several months. He was a former resident of Kinmundy, but had made Odin his home for many years. He is survived by his wife, the former Ellen GRAY, and a daughter, Mrs. Nan RISINGER, who made her home with them; 1 sister, Mrs. Maude HARRELL of West Frankfort, Ill., and 1 brother, W.S. GEORGE of this city. Services were held from the Odin Methodist Church with interment in Centralia Cemetery.

- Kleon PRUETT, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde PRUETT, is a patient in the Methodist Memorial Hospital in Mattoon where he submitted to a hernia operation Monday.

- Master Johnnie JOHNSON, son of Mr. and Mrs. Glen JOHNSON, was painfully injured last Saturday when he fell while playing and run a stick thru his hand which required a doctor’s attention.

- George Pitzer DOUGHERTY, the son of Dr. George Francis and Gilla SAWYER DOUGHERTY, was born at Neoga, Ill. on June 21, 1887, and died at his home in Farina on June 5, 1944 from a heart attack. He attended Neoga High School and graduated with the class of 1907. Having chosen medical practice as his profession, he entered Barnes Medical College in St. Louis and graduated in 1911. On Dec. 31, 1914, he married Mabel Frances McALLISTER and they had 2 children: Eileen of Washington, D.C., and Mack, who is serving with the Navy V-12, Univ. of Ill. He began his medical practice with his father in Neoga and continued with him until his father’s death. After the passing of his father, a brother, X.B. DOUGHERTY, became a member of the firm until 1935 when George moved to Kinmundy. In 1939, he moved to Farina and began practice.

- W.W. LOWE has received word from Mr. and Mrs. Webster LOWE telling him that their son, Warren Mitchell, has received his commission of Ensign in the Merchant Marines.

- The following from this community will leave soon for their preinduction examination: Noah Jackson FERRELL, Garrell Floyd JONES, Thomas Leroy EDWARDS.

- Miss Marguerite SIPES, of Lebanon, Ind., has been awarded a scholarship to Depaw University. She is oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde SIPES. They have another daughter, Martha. The mother was the former Helen MAXEY.

- An article was written by T 5 Joseph G. VALLOW, who is stationed at the Percy Jones General Hospital, on how an Air Ambulance is now returning wounded veterans to general hospitals here in the States.

- Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Walter WARREN called on Mr. and Mrs. Ira MARSHALL Saturday. Their son, Bennie, has finished his preliminary training at Camp Dodge, and he is now a military police member at Ft. Leonard Wood.

- Meadow Branch: Mr. Wes ROBB called on Ira MARSHALL Sunday morning.

- Wilson School: Mildred and Helen KLEISS attended a charivari party Sunday near Iuka at the August QUANDT home, honoring their son, T. Sgt. Paul and Mrs. QUANDT of Oklahoma.

- Pleasant Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Paul SHAFFER and children, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert VANDEVEER and son, John William, and Mr. and Mrs. Herbert ANDERSON and daughters spent Sunday with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Guy SHAFFER and family, as Paul is to leave on June 14th for army duty. He will be badly missed by farmers, who need repair work done on their tractors.

- Pleasant Grove: Pvt. Roy MILLER of Scott Field spent Saturday with his wife and daughters.

- Pleasant Grove: PFC See MILLICAN from Camp Crowder and wife visited Tuesday with Mr. and Mrs. Chas. WANTLAND.

- Pleasant Grove: Pvt. Paul SMITH of Camp Campbell spent Sunday at the Ralph HIESTAND home.

- Miss Donna Louise ANDREWS of Salem and Sgt. Harry LECKRONE of Camp McCoy, formerly a Salem resident, married May 10 at the Methodist Church in Centralia by Rev. Eugene LECKRONE, cousin of the groom. They were attended by Mr. and Mrs. Deloss KAGY of this city. The bride is daughter of Robert J. ANDREWS of Lawrenceville, and Mrs. Bertha ANDREWS of Salem, graduating from Kinmundy H.S. with the class of ‘40, and is employed in office of Circuit Clerk in Salem. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest P. LECKRONE of this city, and graduated from Salem H.S. with the class of ‘37. He attended McKendree College at Lebanon, and Shuster-Martin School of Drama at Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the Army in July 1941, and is located at Camp McCoy. The bride will make her home in Salem. The Wedding Dinner was served in the dining room of Pittinger Hotel in Centralia. (A picture was included with this article.)

- Sgt. and Mrs. Harry R. LECKRONE were given a shower on May 23 at the home of the mother of the bride. A list of those attending and those sending gifts was included.

- Swift School: Lieut. Lyle GREEN arrived here Monday for a few days with his father, Bill GREEN.

- Swift School: Virgil LIVESAY and family spent Sunday with Wess ROBB and wife.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. Edwin HARRELL, Mrs. Allie SEE, and Miss Katie HULTS were Salem visitors Friday afternoon.

- PFC Leland ALDERSON of New Mexico is here for a 2 weeks furlough.

- Dinner guests Sunday at the Mr. and Mrs. Ben JENKINS home were: Mr. and Mrs. Earl ALLMON and family; Mrs. Nettie STEPHENS, Ben’s mother, Mrs. Nellie JENKINS and son, Arthur, Mr. and Mrs. Bob JENKINS and sons, Bobby and Shirley of Alma, and Burdette JENKINS and family. The occasion was in honor of Burdette, who is to leave for the Army this coming week. Mr. and Mrs. Ben JENKINS received word Friday, that their son, James Ershal has landed safely in England.

- Pete MILLER celebrated his 84th birthday June 11 with a family dinner. Those attending were: Mrs. Nell WILSON of Decatur, Mr. and Mrs. Bill MILLER and son, John William, of Tuscola, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence JOLIFF of Centralia, and daughters Mary Jane, Elizabeth, and Opal. Afternoon callers were: Mrs. Donald MILLER and son, Donald Kent, a great-grandson, Mrs. Icy GARRETT, and Mrs. Elizabeth ATKINS and Thelma DOWNS.

- PFC Cecil of Wisconsin is spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank JONES.

- Mrs. Jane HOHLT and Mrs. F.O. GRISSOM honored their sister, Mrs. Marion SIPES’ birthday Wednesday with a birthday party at the home of Mrs. HOHLT. A list of those attending was included.

June 22, 1944:

- Here’s a nice letter from PFC Milton H. LACEY of the Army Air Force, who is stationed in California. He says: Just a few lines to tell you that my address has been changed again. I really enjoy the paper and look forward to getting it every week. There isn’t anything that we don’t read in it. My wife is here with me. We get a kick out of your Zatso column. Also enjoy reading the local news and happenings around home. I don’t think of any other way we could hear about all the other boys. I like to read the letters from the boys that have lots of interesting things to tell. Before my address was changed, I got the Express every Wednesday, just as regular as the week came, but since then it has been floating from squadron to squadron for a few days before it found me. Of course, that was my fault for not sending you my change as soon as it happened. I want to thank you as much as words can because you deserve it. Keep up the good work and maybe most of us will be back before another summer is here.

- Here’s one from John BORING Bkr 1 c of the U.S.N., who is at the present in the Southwest from doing so. Am sorry to say, but I don’t receive the Express as often as I should. Although it is no fault of yours. It just does not reach me very often and several of them have never reached me at all. But believe me when I do get one I read it from front to back. I am on an island in the Southwest Pacific somewhere. But even though I am in the South Sea Islands, I can assure you it is not the beautiful, romantical place some pictures show it to be. Although I can’t complain for I have had very good duty. (A lot better than some of the boys who were farther north than I am.) I was privileged to see my brother a few weeks ago. The ship he is on was in here for several days and we got to visit together quite a few times. Believe me it sure makes a fellow feel good to see someone he knows out here. That was the first time I had met anyone I even knew since I came in the Navy. Wish I could tell you where I am. Perhaps you could tell me if some of the boys from around home are near me. All I can say is that I am somewhere in the New Hebrides. If you knew of any of the boys that are close to me, I would sure appreciate it your letting me know. It seems like a lot of the boys are in England, but England is a large enough place. I expect it is hard enough for them to get together. Well, I better sign off for now. But before I do, I want to thank you for the paper and am enclosing a money order. Perhaps it will help out. I have been intending to do this for a long time but just never did get around to it. Wishing you the best of luck.

- Here’s one from PFC Theodore E. TROUT, better known as "Tuffy", who is somewhere around New Guinea. He says: I will try to write you a few lines to let you know I am still receiving the paper. I want to take this time to thank you again for sending it to me. You will never know how much I enjoy reading the paper, the news and all the letters from the boys overseas. As most of them have told you we are not always in a suitable place to do much writing or to tell you what we do. Mr. VALLOW, I want you to thank the Chamber of Commerce for the carton of cigarettes that they sent me for Christmas. They really came in handy, so thank them for me. Tell every one hello for me and tell them I am OK. I am back in the island again and don’t know when I will get out of here this time. The weather here is very damp. It rains a lot, in fact most of the time. I can remember back in the fair city when we wanted rain, now I wish it would stop. I am very sorry I cannot send you some of this money we are using. It was the hardest stuff for me to get used to. I will try to bring some of it home with me. From the list of names in the paper there must not be very many left in the town. All the jokes I have heard about coming back to the old home town I sure could go for a drink of water back there. We drink a lot of spring water here. I had better close for now, hoping to see you soon. So before closing I want to thank you again for all the papers and also the cigarettes that you sent me.

- Here’s a V-Mail from Pvt. Manuel WELSH, who is overseas somewhere, but didn’t say just where. He says: Well, here I am at last, I don’t know much to write, but I thought I would drop you a few lines. Well, how are you folks back there, just fine I hope. I am feeling fine and am getting bigger and fatter every day. Mr. VALLOW, I would like to get the Kinmundy paper and I am sorry that I didn’t send you my address sooner, but just haven’t got around to it. We sure have been busy over here. I don’t get to write very much, only to my wife and folks. My wife will pay you whatever the expense is for sending me the paper. I guess my folks have already moved from Kinmundy. I was sure sorry to hear they did, because I know they like it there and everyone was nice to them. Even though they did move, I’m sure I will make my home there some time, because I sure would love to live there. Well, I guess I had better close for I haven’t any more room.

- Kenneth ROBB and Floyd GARRETT were patients Monday and Tuesday of this week, in St. Mary’s Hospital, Centralia for the removal of their tonsils.

- Word has been received by relatives here from Charles KLINE and Dale WRIGHT, both in England, that they spent June 6th together. We are happy our boys can meet in other countries.

- Lt. Charles W. LARKIN of the Army Air Force, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles LARKIN, has been visiting his parents in Chicago for the past 30 days. He completed 50 missions over enemy territory and was granted a leave. He has been awarded the 50 mission medal as well as the Oak Leaf Cluster for his destroying a German plane alone in a dog fight. He will return soon to his base in Italy.

- Mrs. Elston GREEN of Patoka submitted to a major operation for gallstones in St. Mary’s Hospital in Centralia on June 17.

- Lt. Lyle GREEN left Monday for Missouri where he will take a month of intensive training in the Air Forces.

- Leon JONES, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar JONES, is now in basic training in Texas. Leon is in the Air Corps.

- S. Sgt. Neil JOHNSON of North Carolina arrived here Saturday for a furlough with his mother, Mrs. Paulene JOHNSON and grandmother, Mrs. Nancy NEIL.

- Duane HANNA, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralston HANNA, reported June 15 to Great Lakes for Boot training.

- Young School: Mr. and Mrs. Clyde MULVANEY and family visited Sunday afternoon with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Luther BEARD. They also called at the Roger MULVANEY home. While there, Little Darrell was playing with the dog which snapped him, making a cruel wound on the arm. Dr. WALKER dressed the wound and ordered them to keep the dog tied up a few days to make sure he wasn’t infected with rabies.

- Meacham: Freddie MISELBROOK went to Chicago last Wednesday where he was inducted into the Army.

- Swift School: C.A. HANNA and family, Kenneth ROBB and family, Dale BALLANCE and family, and George COLE and family attended the St. Paul Picnic Sunday.

- Swift School: Kenneth ROBB went to Centralia Monday and Dr. SNOW removed his tonsils. He stayed in the hospital until Tuesday.

- Green Ridge: Mr. and Mrs. Gage BASSETT and Dorothy spent Sunday evening with Mrs. Edith ARNOLD and Elmer BASSETT.

- East Zion: Mrs. Ruth BASSETT is visiting in Chicago with her husband’s sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Harry SEMRO.

- Pleasant Grove: Pvt. Roy MILLER spent his weekend leave with homefolks.

- Pvt. Fred BOYD returned Saturday to his camp in South Carolina having been called here due to the accident of their son, Billie.

- Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Wes ROBB have received word that their son, Harold is transferred from a camp in California to a camp in Wisconsin.

- Meadow Branch: Adolph TOCKSTEIN went to Mark Greer Hospital in Vandalia last week for an appendectomy and he is in serious condition.

- Meadow Branch: Charles BERRY left for Chicago last Tuesday night to be taken into the Army. His wife will remain at home until he is located.

- Junior GARRETT is home from his employment in Illiopolis, Ill. nursing a mashed right foot.

- Mrs. Lewie SULLENS and Larry, Mrs. Carl DUNLAP and Dorothy Frances of Morris, Ill. came Tuesday, and returned to their homes Friday accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. A.C. DUNLAP and Mrs. Icy GARRETT, who will visit a few days in Morris.

June 29, 1944:

- Here’s a nice letter from Cpl. Clyde THOMAS, who is stationed in England. He says: Just a few lines to give you my new address and to thank you for sending the paper, which I appreciate very much. I certainly enjoy reading your paper, especially the letters from the boys in the different theaters of operation and also a lot of news from around home that I probably wouldn’t get otherwise. I spent a short while in Scotland, but am back in England now. It is very pretty country and seems more modern and up to date than England. I like it here alright and have had things pretty nice so far, but I think we will all thank God for the day when we can come home back to the good old U.S.A. I must close thanking you again for the paper.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Harry GRAY, Jr., who is also in England. He says: I am now in the E.T.O. (England). It is not a bad place to be because a lot of the boys are in a lot worse places. Well, I received my first Kinmundy paper and was sure glad to get it. I like to read the Zatso and the service boys letters. Also have some pals that like to read the paper too. Most boys in the service think being overseas is a bad thing and don’t want to come across. But I sure have seen a lot of things since I left home. I have been in Ireland, Scotland, and England. All 3 are very pretty countries. I sure enjoyed the boat ride over too. I never saw so much water in my whole life, than when I came across. It was kind of a rough trip, but I made out pretty well outside of days when I was seasick. Before we got on the boat, the Red Cross gave us a cup of coffee and something to eat also when we got off. So I think the Red Cross helps the boys in the service a lot. The people here are pretty nice to us soldiers, so we have a pretty nice time when we go on pass. But the funny part about it, I have never been on pass since I have been over here. Every time I think I will go out I change my mind and instead write my wife a letter. There is one thing I don’t like about the E.T.O., we have to sew and wash our own clothes, so the army as a whole makes a pretty good girl out of you. There are a lot of things I would like to tell you about, but you know I can’t. But when the D day is over and the boys come marching home, maybe we can tell you more about it then. Well, I can’t write very good, but maybe you can read this some way. I want to thank you again for the paper and keep them coming am always glad to get it. So good bye and keep the old home town a going.

- Here’s another V-Mail from Pvt. Manuel WELSH, who is still in England. He says: Just received the paper and thought I would write you a few lines to let you know how much I appreciate getting it. I look forward to receiving it regular now. It takes quite awhile for my mail to reach me sometimes. I sure enjoy reading the letters that are in the paper from the boys in service, and I enjoy reading the Zatso column and I am sure the other boys feel the same way I do. I sure do like it over here in England. The people sure are nice to us. I wish I could have been there for the banquet. But maybe I can make it next year. Well I guess I will close. I want to thank you again for the paper.

- Here’s a V-Mail from Pvt. Thomas BOONE, who is some where in New Guinea. He says: I am setting in my tent listening to it rain. It has rained for the last 48 hours continually. It rains here almost all of the time, but lets up for an hour or so every day. When the sun does shine it is really hot and dries the ground up in a few hours. I have been here a little over 3 weeks. Work almost every day, but the work is not hard. We have a picture show that we can go to free and they give us the news every night. Cigarettes are about 40 cents a carton in American money. We can have all the cocoanuts we want to eat if we want to pick them up. I haven’t received a Kinmundy paper since I have been here. I believe a March issue was the last. I have been on the move since February and haven’t been in one place over 6 weeks so they haven’t had time to catch up with me. I have got to see lots of the world in the last 10 months. But I wouldn’t give one foot of Illinois for it all. I haven’t seen many white women as the only ones here are Red Cross workers and nurses and there are only a few of those. Well it is almost bedtime and the wind has blown my candles out 3 times, so far. So will close for tonight.

- Here’s one from James DONOHO, S2 c who is stationed along the coast of Virginia. He says: I have been getting your paper for some time and certainly enjoy reading it. I had no idea just how much the news meant until I got away from home and couldn’t hear it first hand. I’ve intended to write you before, but I have been pretty busy up to now. I have an easy job now, of course it is only temporary. We’re just marking time until they get ready for us to go to sea. I especially enjoyed the paper this week, as it was the first I’ve received for a few weeks, although I was sorry to hear of the death of Major JOHNSON. I didn’t know him personally, but he was some one from home. I enjoy the letters from the other fellows very much. It’s next to best to a chat on the street corner. Until I can tell you in person, I want to say "Thanks you are doing a swell job."

- Sgt. Woodrow JOHNSTON home on furlough after being wounded in Italian Invasion: Here’s a letter from Sgt. Woodrow JOHNSTON, of Meacham twp., in which he tells of being wounded in the invasion of Italy. He says: Just a few lines to show my appreciation for the old home town paper. You don’t have any idea how it helps to keep up the morale of the boys who are overseas. Well, Mr. VALLOW, I was in the invasion of Africa and Tunisia and the invasion of Sicily, where I didn’t duck quite soon enough. I was hit in the back with shrapnel and was flown back to Africa where I was operated to remove the shrapnel. I had a little trouble and a second operation was performed to remove my right kidney. It has affected me in a few different ways, but I believe I will soon be batting them off again. I landed in New York city on June 9th, and arrived here on my furlough of 25 days and boy, are they going fast. Then I report to a hospital for medical care. I was in the hospital for 7 months. The doctors and nurses are sure doing a wonderful job on the battlefields. I was in the 9th Division until I was wounded at Randazzo, Sicily. Those are the boys who are doing such a good job on the Normandy beach today. God Bless each and every one of them, and also all of my friends from home that are overseas in the battle zones. I was only over 20 months. My experience was as a Sgt. in the Infantry keeping the transportation moving. I will thank you again for the paper, and boys, I am done in this one, but keep up the good work. It is not going to be much longer. (A picture accompanied this letter.)

- Chas. R. SEE, SC 2 c, of U.S.N. has had his going out to sea orders.

- Word was received here last week by Mr. M.C. CROSSETT of the death of his cousin, Earl CROSSETT, 80, which occurred June 22 in Chicago. He lived here at one time on a farm, and was the son of Harland CROSSETT and was a retired locomotive engineer for the Rock Island. For the past few years he has lived in Glendale, Calif., and was visiting in Chicago at the time of his death.

- Glen R. WILLIAMS, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.E. WILLIAMS, is now home from the army after serving 30 months in the South Pacific. Glen has a medical discharge from the army.

- Edward MOELLER, 60, a farmer residing west of this city, died suddenly Tuesday from a heart attack. Services are being held this afternoon from St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church with interment in St. Paul Cemetery. He had been in ill health for some time, but did not feel any worse than common. He was son of Henry and Catherine MOELLER and was born in Foster twp. on Feb. 13, 1884. Here he grew to manhood. On Sept. 27, 1906, he married Anna NABER, and they had 6 children: Clarence of Dixon; Mildred FOULKS of Peoria; Sgt. Raymond, now serving with the armed forces in England; Erma WINTERS, now at home while her husband is in the Army; Leona of Peoria; and Irwin, who died in 1927 at the age of 17. He is also survived by his wife; 2 sons-in-law, Charles FOULKS and Orris WINTERS; 2 daughters-in-law; 4 grandchildren; his mother; 3 brothers, Albert of Kinmundy, Henry of Shobonier, and Theodore of St. Peter; and 1 sister, Mrs. Emma NABER of St. Peter. He has been a farmer all of his life and for the past 19 years has lived on the E.W. DOOLEN farm in North Fork neighborhood. He was a life-long member of the St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church.

- The Memorial service held for Major George A. JOHNSON, which was held Sunday, was detailed. He was killed in action in Italy on May 25. He has been buried in an American Cemetery in Italy, and after the war is over, the family has been promised, if at all possible, it will be returned home for interment. A list of those from out-of-town attending, was included.

- We are in receipt of an announcement from Walter WILLIAMS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy WILLIAMS, of the graduation exercises held at the Pecos Army Air Field in Texas on June 27. He received his wings and was commissioned a Lieutenant.

- S. Sgt. Neil JORNSON returned Monday to his camp in North Carolina.

- Sherman: George SOLDNER is suffering from injuries received by a fall from a horse from a broken stirrup.

- Meadow Branch: Verne SCHOONOVER, who has had his 5 weeks boot training at Great Lakes Training Station spent 10 days here with his wife and parents, returning Sunday to Great Lakes for further training.

- Young School: There seems to have been a little excitement in the community this week: Clyde MULVANY’s machine shed caught fire when a spark from a gasoline motor ignited some spilled gasoline. The blaze quickly spread but was under control with the help of those present. Wednesday night at about midnight, Virgil SEE was awakened by the sound of fire which had partly burned the mattress on a day bed and was already blazing well up the wall. But the well was handy and the fire was quickly extinguished with not much damage to the house.

- East Zion: Mr. and Mrs. Dee HOPKINS called at the Mr. and Mrs. Charles ARNOLD home Sunday evening.

- Lt. C.M. BROOM, accompanied by his wife and son returned Saturday to Baltimore, Md. after spending a 8 day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John A. BROOM and family in Alma.

- Meacham: Sgt. and Mrs. Charles HAYES of Texas are spending their furlough here with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ira MERRITT and other relatives and friends.

- Swift School: Bill GREEN was made very happy Tuesday when he received a telegram from his son, Lt. Lyle, announcing the arrival of a new son at Palm Springs Hospital in Cal. named Raymond Lyle. Lt. GREEN is in Mo. at present and expects to leave soon for foreign duty but hopes to fly to Cal. to see his son before leaving.

- Swift School: Ed MOELLER died Tuesday morning.

- Meacham: Mrs. Alice SEE and R.N. Edith and Alan KETTLE of Chicago spent Tuesday night and Wednesday with Mr. and Mrs. Edwin HARRELL.

- Swift School: Billie MORRIS and sons, Darrell ARNOLD of Breese and Guy ARNOLD and Monroe LANSFORD spent the weekend near Carlyle fishing.

- Swift School: Clyde BASSETT and family spent Sunday evening at the Ren WAINSCOTT home.

- Swift School: Cleve DOOLEN and wife received a short letter from their son, Lt. Roy, this week, which said "Somewhere in France seeing lots of sights". This is their first letter since the invasion started.

- Sgt. and Dwight HANNA of El Paso, Texas have a baby daughter born June 27.

- Miletus: Glen HAMPSTEN and Miss Leona KOODER of Tonti neighborhood were married in Salem Friday of last week. They will make their home for an indefinite time with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ervin HAMPSTEN.

- Pvt. Ernie MULVANEY of Missouri returned June 26 after spending a few days with his father, Clarence MULVANEY and other relatives.

- Mr. and Mrs. Harve BRANSON have received word that their grandsons, Eugene S1 c, and PFC Earl Stanley PATHEL have arrived safely overseas.

- The Future Homemakers met Wednesday afternoon with their leader, Mrs. Mildred HANNA, with 18 members present and several ladies as guests, Miss Louise SCOTT was present, and after the business meeting, gave a very interesting demonstration on canning. The Club decided on having their picnic the last part of the month. The next regular meeting will be July 5th. Evelyn BASSETT, Reporter.

July 6, 1944:

- PFC Henry O. HINKLEY Killed in Action June 7th in Southwest Pacific Theater: A telegram was received Tuesday evening by Mr. and Mrs. H.O. HINKLEY, of Alma, stating that their son, PFC Henry O. HINKLEY, Jr., had been killed in action on Biak Island on June 7th. Needless to say this cast a shadow of gloom over the entire community. This was Alma’s first casualty. PFC Henry O. HINKLEY, the youngest son of Henry O. and Abbie KELSEY HINKLEY, was born March 4, 1924, in Elvsburg, Penn., and died at the age of 20 years, 3 months, and 3 days. Most of his life was spent in and around Alma. He attended the High School in Salem, graduating with the class of ‘41 and where he had attained a great athletic record. He spent 2 years in Carbondale where he attended Southern Illinois Normal University. He was inducted into the Army on March 5, 1943, and assigned to the Infantry. He left the states July 1943, landing in Australia on July ‘___. He was moved to New Guinea in March 1944 and has seen a good deal of combat service. After entering the service, he was never granted a furlough in order to visit homefolks. Besides his parents, he leaves 2 brothers, S. Sgt. Anson A., now with the Weather Section of the Army Air Forces and stationed in Dutch Guinea, and Harlan K. of Carbondale, Ill. The only sister, Audrey I. HARRIS, was killed in an auto accident near Alma in 1937. We are told that a memorial service will be held for this lad in Alma but the date for this service has not be set as yet. Our hearts are truly saddened and our heartfelt sympathy goes out for this good family.

- Pvt. Roy Q. HINES of Texas, was operated on for appendicitis June 25.

- Cpl. and Mrs. Carl MILLICAN are enjoying a 10 day furlough here with relatives and friends. Mrs. MILLICAN is the former Ruth HINES.

- On July 1st at the Twin City Bible Church at Urbana occurred the marriage of Miss Mary Frances ANDERSON, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George ANDERSON of Tolono, Ill., and Leland E. OLDEN, son of Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe OLDEN of Kinmundy. They were attended by Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe ANDERSON, Mrs. Grace BUDDIE, and Tommy ANDERSON of Tolono. Mrs. OLDEN attended Tolono High School and Illini Beauty School graduating with the class of ‘41. Mr. OLDEN is employed with the Illinois Central Railroad. The couple will reside in Effingham.

- Ensign Robert Lee FOX of Plattsburg, N.Y., was the guest of Miss Leona JACKSON, Wednesday and Thursday.

- Ensign Ernest V. BROOM, who graduated from Midshipmen’s School at Columbia University, New York, left Monday to report for duty at the Sub-Chaser School, Miami, Fla. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John A. BROOM of Alma.

- Mr. and Mrs. Don WILLIAMS of Chicago spent the Fourth here with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.E. WILLIAMS. Glenn WILLIAMS, who was recently discharged from the army, returned to Chicago with them where he will seek employment.

- We have received word of the death of Mrs. W.H. MEEKS in San Antonio, Texas on July 3, after an illness of several months. She was a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. D.C. BEAVER. Mr. and Mrs. MEEKS were residents of our city many years ago and are relatives of Mr. and Mrs. Louis LACEY of Farina.

- Mr. Ernest MATTES of Chappin, Ill. are here with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. John STOCKER. Mr. MATTES has just entered the military service.

- The 4-H Future Home Makers Club met at the Swift School House Friday night, June 30, for their June party. Ice cream and cake were served. Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. Claude HANNA and daughter, Wyona, Mr. and Mrs. Carroll GARRETT and daughters, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde BASSETT and daughters, Mr. and Mrs. Tom HELPINGSTINE and daughters, Mr. and Mrs. Elwin CONANT and family, Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT and daughter, and Mona, Donna and Marjorie CONANT. Evelyn BASSETT, Reporter.

- Mary Jo GREEN was born Sept. 29, 1934, and died June 29, 1944. She is the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. John W. GREEN of Farina. She is survived by the following sisters and brother, Mrs. Arthur M. GILBERT of Baraboo, Wis., Mrs. J.H. DISS of this city, and P.F.C. James GREEN of Texas. Services were held July 1 in the S.D.B. Church in Farina. Interment was in Farina Cemetery.

- Miss Edna FOSTER returned Tuesday to her work in St. Louis, Mo., after spending a few days here with relatives. She was accompanied home by her mother, Mrs. Anna FOSTER.

- Mrs. Clifton LEMAY and baby daughter are visiting in Arkansas with Pvt. Clifton LEMAY.

- "337" In the Service: Leland B. ALDERSON, Cecil ALDRICH, Xon L. ALEXANDER, Daniel A. ARNOLD, Grace ARNOLD, Mark L. ARNOLD, Donna B. ARNOLD, Raymond ATKINS, Merle BAYLIS, Lloyd BAILEY, Ray Y. BAILEY, William BARBEE, Lyle E. BARBEE, Everett D. BASS, Oliver M. BASS, Robert L. BASS, James A. BASSETT, James M. BASSETT, Lawrence H. BASSETT, Charles BERRY, Thomas A. BOONE, John T. BORING, Joseph BORING, James R. BOSTON, Marion BOSTON, Norman R. BOWMAN, W. Arthur BOYD, Fred BOYD, Thomas F. BOYD, Allen T. BRASEL, Cecil BRIM, Charles BRIM, C.M. BROOM, Dale R. BROOM, John A. BROOM Jr., Wilbur A. BROOM, Ernest V. BROOM, Earl BRIMBERRY, Joe A. BRIMBERRY, Dean BRUBAKER, Forrest BURKETT, Virgil BURKETT, Warren BUSWELL, George BUTTS, Harold B. BUTTS, John W. CALDWELL, Kenneth P. CALDWELL, Ted CALDWELL, Clyde B. CAMERER, Harold CHANCE, Henry CHARLTON, Frances CHEATUM, Floyd CHEATUM, Alonzo CHURCH, Eldon D. COLCLASURE, Arvie Lee COX, Ambrose L. CRAIG, Lyle CONANT, James D. CONANT, Albert CORRELL, Carl CRAIN, Fred E. CRAIN, Roy W. DAVIS, W. Ralph DAY, Dwight C. DAY, Ivan DEVORE, Chas. T. DeWEESE, Henry E. DeWEESE, Beryl DISS, Charles D. DISS, James DONOHO, A.H. DOOLEN, Charles L. DOOLEN, Bennie DOOLEN, Carl G. DOOLEN, Florence DOOLEN, Roy DOOLEN, Walter J. DOOLEN, Louie F. DOUDERA, Leo E. DONOVAN, Norman Lee DOWNS, Tracey DOWNS, Raymond DOUDERA, James O. EAGAN, Floyd EAGAN, Noah EAGAN, Thomas EDWARDS, D.B. EGELSTON, James ELLIS, Tiny L. ELLIS, Carl T. FIELDS, Harold W. FIELDS, Charles DeFORDE, Kenneth L. FULFER, Andrew W. GAMMON, Rex GAMMON, Fred GAMMON, Harry L. GAMMON, Merle GARDENER, Dwight W. GARNER, Chas. W. GARRETT, James E. GARRETT, Marvin GARRETT, Theodore L. GARRETT, Melvin GEILER, Christy GENTRY, Orville GORDON, Donald R. GRAY, Harry E. GRAY Jr., Robert A. GRAY, Carl K. GREEN, Lyle W. GREEN, James W. GREEN, William H. GREEN Jr., Thomas Leroy GREEN, Edward HALLER, Delbert S. HAMMER, Howard HAMMER, James E. HAMMER, Merle HAMMER, Clifton HAMPSTEN, Louis Ervin HAMPSTEN, Richard D. HAMPSTEN, Virgil HAMPSTEN, James HANKS, H. Dwight HANNA, B.L. HANNA, Robert D. HANNA, Duane HANNA, Eldred J. HANSON, John HANSON, Lewis HAYS, Carl HEADLEY, Harve L. HEADLEY, Merle B. HEADLEY, Russell HEADLEY, R.C. HEADLEY, Wesley HEADLEY, Orville E. HEICHER, John Howard HELM, William H. HILL, John HINES, Gail W. HINES, Anson A. HINKLEY, Billy Eugene HOCKADAY, Ralph G. HOYT, Francis HICKMAN, Dwight INGRAM, Glenn G. INGRAM, Cecil E. INGRAM, Elwin G. INGRAM, Joseph R. INGRAM, L.C. INGRAM, Ray H. INGRAM, W. Coy INGRAM, Virgil U. JAMISON, Kenneth E. JACKSON, H. Merle JACKSON, Charles E. JASPER, Burdette JENKINS, Emmerson JONES, Harold W. JONES, Leon JONES, Ralph JENKINS, Chas. W. JENKINS, James E. JENKINS, John E. JEZEK, Edward JEZEK, Benjamin N. JOHNSON, C.W. JOHNSON, Woodrow JOHNSTON, Harvey M. JOHNSTON, Harold JONES, Cecil F. JONES, Richard JONES, James C. JONES, George KEEN, L.C. (Pete) KEEN, Harold KLEISS, Charles B. KLINE, G.R. KOTTKAMP, Harlas D. KRUTSINGER, M. Hugh LACEY, Kenneth P. LACEY, Luther LACEY, H. Ted LACEY, Harold LAMBIRD, Roosevelt LAMBIRD, Everett LANSFORD, Jack LANSFORD, Glenn LEE, Clifton LEMAY, Zarold LEWIS, Kenneth LEWIS, Nancy LOWE, Rev. Cecil LOWE, Joseph LOVETT, Robert MAHAN, Robert G. MARSHALL, Virgil I. MARSHALL, James M. McCARTY, Rex McCARTY, John W. McCULLEY, Walter McHATTON, Ira G. MERRITT, George W. MEYER, Chas. MEYER, Donald K. MILLER, Ray George MILLER, Harold R. MILLER, See MILLICAN, Ralph MILLICAN, Frederick MISELBROOK, Oliver R. MITCHELL, Charles T. MINER, Harold H. MOELLER, Raymond A. MOELLER, Willard E. MOELLER, Clyde Q. MORGAN, James MORGAN, Richard F. MOTCH, Russell MOUNT, Arthur MUEHLHAUSEN, Arthur MULVANEY, Ralph P. MULVANEY, Edward MULVANEY, Tanner MULVANY, Ernie K. MULVANY, Charley NEAL, Perry L. NEAVILLE, Royal Bruce OLDEN, Raymond OLDEN, H.D. OSBORNE, Warren OSBORNE, Earl W. OUTHOUSE, Tony PERGL, Donald D. PARRISH, Paul PARRISH, Oliver Paul PERRY, Vernon Cleo PERRY, Lewis Chester PERRY, John PHILLIPS, Jr., James W. PIGG, R. Wayne PIGG, Hartzel L. POWELL, Charles E. PRUETT, Frederick PRUETT, Carl E. PRUETT, Lynn PORTER, Carl E. PURCELL, John D. PURCELL, Dan S. RAINEY Jr., Darrell D. REESE, Flory REPEC, Conrad REPEC, John G. RICHARDSON, Harold W. ROBB, John R. ROBB, Howard L. ROBB, Erwin H. SCHNEIDER, Merle SCHNEIDER, Earl SCHWABE, Xon SCHOOLEY, Charles R. SEE, Earl SEE, John F. SEE, Frederick SEE, John SHAFFER, Russell SHAFFER, Leland F. SHORT, Philip E. SHORT, Edwin SHREFFLER, George I. SHREFFLER, Lyle SHREFFLER, Ralph W. SIMER, Harold SIMMONS, Herschel SIMMONS, Harold SLANE, Anne SLOVICK, Joe SLOVICK, Francis SMITH, John SMITH, Kenneth D. SMITH, Warren C. SMITH, C.C. SMITH, John H. SMITH, Charles P. SMITH, Louie B. SOUTIER, Maxey M. SPENCER, Arno SPURLIN, Lewis L. SPURLIN, Orval SPURLIN, Clouris M. STIPP, Darrell B. STIPP, Francis G. SULLENS, Orville V. SULLENS, Rolla SULLENS, Sterling J. SULLIVAN, Burdette SWIFT, Lyle SWIFT, E.A. THOMS, Clyde B. THOMAS, Adolph TOCKSTEIN, Theodore E. TROUT, Charles V. VALLOW, Joseph G. VALLOW, Annette VALLOW, Junior L. VANSCYOC, Grover C. VETETO, Walter W. WILLIAMS, Duane WALTON, Lloyd T. WANTLAND, William WEISS, Manuel WELSH, Pearl WHITE, Willard WILEY, Kenneth WILKINSON, Woodrow WILKINSON, Chloris WILLIAMS, Dewayne WILLIAMS, Eugene WILLIAMS, Fred WILLIAMS, Henry E. WILLIAMS, Richard WILLIAMS, Walter WILLIAMS, Bill WILSON, Dale R. WRIGHT, Paul L. WRIGHT, Kenneth WRIGHT, Andrew YATES, Victor E. YATES, Charles W. YOUNG.

- Mrs. Roy HULSEY and children were visiting Charles FORD and family Sunday.

- Mr. Roy HULSEY was out rounding up his litter of pigs. They were feasting on the neighbor’s chinch pigs.

- Mrs. Thomas CHEADLE received a telegram from her sister of Orchard, Colo. stating that her husband, Joe VETTARI, had died at his home there on June 27.

- Swift School: Emma SWIFT and Andy RICHARDS of South Bend, Ind. were married in Indiana on Saturday and motored here for a visit with her son, Paul SWIFT and family, Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Paul SWIFT and son, Leroy, gave a family dinner in their honor at their home. Present were: Mrs. Lillie McCULLEY and grandchildren, Billy and Carol THOMS, Mr. and Mrs. Otis CHARLTON and son, John David, Mr. and Mrs. Thurman McCULLEY and daughter, Dorothy, Mr. and Mrs. Sam LOWE and son, Sammy, and Mr. and Mrs. Dale ARNOLD and son, Leon.

- Swift School: Mrs. Kathryn WILLIAMS and 3 children of Sterling, spent the weekend here recently with her father, Sam LOWE, and family. Her husband, Elmo, is stationed at Great Lakes Naval Station.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT and daughter, Donna Mae, entertained relatives to a family dinner at their home, Sunday. Those present were: Wess ROBB and wife, Virgil LIVESAY and family, Clyde BASSETT and family, Clyde GARRETT and family, Bert GARRETT and family, and Mr. and Mrs. Selby GARRETT of Alma.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT and daughter, Donna Mae, spent Wednesday evening with Forrest JONES and wife in Kinmundy.

- Lt. Clyde MORGAN spent several days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.H. MORGAN. He is enroute to California.

- Young School: Little Billy Dean SEE was in Salem Hospital Monday and Tuesday having his tonsils and adenoids removed.

- Young School: Mr. and Mrs. Ralph ROSE and daughter attended a wedding anniversary dinner at the Claude JAMISON home on Sunday.

- Meadow Branch: Mrs. Chas. BERRY and Mrs. Mae PYLE went to Arkansas to spend the weekend with Pvt. Chas. BERRY, who is stationed in camp there. He was moved from Ft. Sheridan last week.

- Young School: Xon WILKINSON of Chicago is spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ellis WILKINSON, before he leaves for the service with the U.S. Navy.

July 13, 1944:

- Here’s our first letter received from France and it’s from Pvt. Ralph JENKINS, better known to his friends as "Pug". He rather liked England and from the way he talks, he might fall in love with France. He says: Well, here I am again and this time from France. Thought I would drop you a little about this country, etc. France is a very level country. They have a lot of rock and hedge fences. The people have seen lots of hardships and they are rationed terrible. They wear wooden shoes and only get 3 cigarettes a day. Just think how it would be if the people back there could only get 3 cigs a day. I know it would be awful on me. But we get plenty of cigarettes. That’s one thing that helps me out a lot. I haven’t had any mail since I’ve been in France and I am sure dying to get some. The mail man told us yesterday that there would be mail for us in about a week. So that isn’t so bad, as there are only 6 more days to go. Haven’t seen a boy from home since I have been in England and France, but hope to before long. My brother is over here but I haven’t heard from him in over 3 weeks now. The houses the French people live in look like our barns back home. And I sorta wish I had taken French in High School. I heard a couple of Frenchmen talking the other day and it seemed like children just learning to talk. Maybe I might get onto it before long. Well, I would like to write more, but I can’t think of anything else this time. So will close hoping we hurry up and get to Berlin, so we can come home for good and I’m telling you it can’t be too soon for me. Well, Norris, I want to thank you again for the paper and here’s hoping I get one before long. So for now I’m saying ‘Cherio’.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Manuel WELSH, who is also in France. He says: I haven’t written you in quite some time, so I thought I would drop you a few lines. Well, how is everything going at Kinmundy. Just fine I hope. Well here I am overseas in France now, so my APO number has changed, maybe my wife has already told you about it. I have been looking for some of the boys over here, but so far I haven’t any one, maybe I’ll run into one that I know some day. I doubt if you can make his letter out because I am writing it in a fox hole and it sure is hard to write. I sure did enjoy reading the paper while I was in England, and maybe it will catch up with me pretty soon over here. Well, I guess I had better close for now, so keep everything rolling back there.

- Here’s one from Cpl. Ray BAILEY, who doesn’t say just where he is located at the present time. However, we do know that he is overseas some where. He says: Just a few lines to let you know my new address and to thank you for the paper. I have been receiving the paper regularly up until a few weeks ago. I guess the mail will get straightened out soon. The paper really means a lot to us boys away from home. A lot of the boys from other parts of the country enjoy reading our hometown paper, too. I know mine is passed around to a lot of the boys. I wish it was possible to find some of the boys from home, who are in the same are as I, but it is rather difficult. We are not allowed to tell where we are, but I like it very much. In closing I wish to thank you again for the paper, and I hope all the boys are home soon to thank you personally.

- Our campaign for donations for the paper sent to the boys and girls in the service was brought to a close this week by Mr. B.F. LINTON. He offered to close it for us 2 weeks ago, which, indeed, was very nice of him, but we asked him to let us continue it for 2 more weeks. The grand total has now reached $500.00, the amount we asked you for this service. Now all the boys and girls in the service from this community are assured of receiving our paper, providing they keep us posted on the change of their addresses, which change quite often.

- Mrs. Maude BARBEE of this city has been entertaining her sister and brother, Mrs. Dora LAWSON and Mr. Bailey NUNN of Michigan the past week. On July 9th this family enjoyed a reunion with their other brothers: Mr. and Mrs. Bill NUNN of Springfield, Ill., and Joe NUNN of Herrin, Ill. This is the first time in 27 years this family has been together.

- Mrs. John STOCKER has been in Highland, Ill. with her father, Mr. CLEMENTZ, who has submitted to an amputation of a leg because of diabetes. At last report, he is as well as can be expected due to his advanced age of over 80 years.

- Art COCKRELL and Mrs. Lulu KOTTKAMP were married yesterday in the Methodist Parsonage in this city. They were unattended. They will make their home in what is known as the Billie BROWN property in the south part of town, owned by the bride and her mother, Mrs. Margaret SCULLEY. The groom is well known in this community, having been in the furniture business here for the past 10 years. The bride came here about 2 years ago after spending several years in St. Louis. Both were born and reared in Meacham twp. and were childhood sweethearts.

- Mrs. Veronica JESSMAN, wife of John JESSMAN, died at her home west of this city last Thursday after an illness of a few days. Services were held at St. Philomena’s Church with interment in the Catholic Cemetery. Veronica BRAZIS was born in Lithuania on Aug. 4, 1872. In 1891 she married John JESSMAN, and immediately after there marriage, they came to America. Mr. JESSMAN had previously been in America, and returned to his homeland to claim his bride. After arriving in America, they located in Pana, Ill., where they remained for 4 years, moving to Kinmundy 49 years ago. They had 7 children, 3 boys dying in infancy, John Jr. dying at the age of 14, and 3 daughters, Helena of Detroit, Mich., and Katherine and Amelia of Chicago, who along with the companion who has attained the age of 93 years, is left to mourn their loss. She leaves 2 half-sisters, Mrs. Sally KIZIS and Mrs. Caroline ROGERS of Chicago.

- Mr. J.B. MAXEY is suffering from running a rusty nail through his left foot Saturday.

- Big Snake: Last week we had a big fish story, so this week it’s snakes. Mrs. Maude BARBEE went into her basement for a can of fruit and as she layed her hand on the fruit shelf, she felt something cold and upon investigation she found a 3˝ foot snake coiled up there for a nap. She immediately called for help and the reptile was killed after a battle royal.

- PFC James GREEN returned to his camp in Texas after spending 2 weeks here with his wife and baby and other relatives and attending the funeral of his sister.

- PFC David SCHOOLEY of Florida, has been visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James SCHOOLEY and other relatives.

- Mr. and Mrs. Raymond OLDEN have a baby boy born July 5th.

- Mrs. O.K. MILLER of this city and Miss Maryse McARTOR of Edgewood were married yesterday.

- I.C. Train No. 1, known as the Creole, was wrecked Monday at Odin. 6 passenger coaches left the rails and 1 turned over. 10 passengers and the flagman was taken to Salem and Centralia Hospitals. All were dismissed from the Hospital on Tuesday except for the flagman, who is reported on the way to recovery. The cause of the wreck was a buckled rail.

- The Girls 4-H Future Homemakers met at the home of our leader, Mrs. Mildred HANNA, July 4, with 13 members present. After the ‘Pledge of Allegiance’ and ‘4-H Pledge’, the following talks were given: How to Prevent Food Spoilage by Lila GARRETT, How I Canned Gooseberries by Helen BASSETT, Raising Turkeys by Elma CONANT, and How Hands Can Become more Useful by Virginia HELPINGSTINE. A demonstration on table setting was given by Marjorie CONANT and Betty Ann HELPINGSTINE. After refreshments of homemade ice cream and cake, we adjourned to meet in 2 weeks. Evelyn BASSETT, Reporter.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. Otis SEE of Monmouth, Ill., Mrs. Alice SEE of Kinmundy, and grandson, Jimmie LAMMERSIEK of St. Louis called on Mr. and Mrs. Edwin HARRELL Friday evening.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. Dwight ALEXANDER and son, Jimmie, called on Edwin HARRELL and wife Sunday afternoon.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. Hugh COPPLE and 2 children returned to their home Monday from East Chicago, Ind. where Mr. COPPLE has had employment for the past 2 years.

- Pleasant Grove: Ruth Edna SHAFFER has employment at Salem Hospital as a Nurses’ Aid.

- Pvt. Raymond OLDEN of Colorado arrived here Friday to meet his new son, Billy Roy, who was born July 5.

- Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Robert FRYE arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Walter WARREN last Wednesday from a Naval station in Minn. and visited relatives until Monday, when they left for camp in Va., where Mr. FRYE will take further training.

- Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth LECKRONE and son, Garrett, are here and in Salem for 2 weeks visiting Mr. and Mrs. O.E. GARRETT and Mr. and Mrs. James LECKRONE.

- Sgt. and Mrs. Glenn INGRAM of Texas are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe OLDEN and family. Sgt. INGRAM returned to camp Wednesday. Mrs. INGRAM will remain with her parents.

- Swift School: Leroy GREEN is home with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. R.H. GREEN. Leroy has just completed his boot training at Great Lakes, Ill.

- Ensign and Mrs. Orval SPURLIN have a baby girl, Susan Anne, born July 6 in Mattoon Hospital. SPURLIN is stationed in New York City waiting overseas duty.

- Miss Nancy LOWE is spending part of her vacation from Washington University, St. Louis, in Colorado Springs, Colo. with her grandmother, Mrs. Florence WHITE.

- Sherman: Several from here attended the funeral of Carl WINKLER at West Point, Tuesday.

- Mrs. Florence CONANT has returned from an extended visit in Portland, Ore. with her son, Lt. James CONANT, and other relatives.

- East Zion: Mrs. Dale HAMMER and children of Sumner spent Sunday until Tuesday here with Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd HAMMER. Mr. HAMMER came for them Tuesday evening.

- East Zion: Mrs. Wes ROBB and Mrs. Harold ROBB spent the latter part of last week in Sumner with Mr. and Mrs. Dale HAMMER and family.

July 20, 1944:

- Here’s a dandy letter written June 28th from S. Sgt. Dale R. BROOM, who is sojourning in China for the present. He says: I have written to you before, but I guess you didn’t receive the letter. I get the Kinmundy Express quite often. Yesterday, I received some March and April issues. I enjoy reading the letters you print in the paper from boys in the Service, also the Zatso column. The letter that James ELLIS wrote to you was interesting. I would write to him if I knew his address. I haven’t run on to any of the boys from around home over here, as yet, although I know there are some boys from around home in India, maybe some in China that I don’t know about. I hear there is a JASPER boy here in China, but I don’t know his address and haven’t seen him yet. I have been overseas since January 1942. I spent 18 months in India and have been in China for the past 10 months. The Monsoon season is on now (rainy season). It doesn’t get as hot here during the rainy season as it did in the jungle where I spent the Monsoon season last year (in the part of China I am in.) There are places in China where it gets plenty hot during summer months. I went to a Rest Camp about a month ago. It is a nice place situated up in the mountains on the banks of a lake. The lake is supplied with water by a spring at the bottom. They have facilities for swimming, boating, and fishing. The water is almost crystal clear. The G.I.’s don’t have much luck catching fish but the Chinese have pretty good luck catching them. The best thing about a rest camp was the good chow. They have all G. I. rations there, while at camps we’ve all ate Chinese rations there, get some fresh fruit and vegetables this time of year, such as tomatoes, beans, and peaches. The peaches are awfully small and don’t have much taste but still they taste like peaches. Boy! How I would like to bite into a Southern Illinois peach right now or some of those Yellow Transparent apples that are ripe about now. We have 3 shows (movies) per week here, most of them are pretty good show. We get most of the popular magazines such as Life, Esquire, Look and Saturday Evening Post and others which are supplied by Special Services. I hope you received that CBI Roundup that I sent you about 2 weeks ago. I hope the Rotation Policy get to working over here soon. I guess we have it easy here compared to some of the other theaters of operation. I will close by saying thanks for sending the paper. It has world wide circulation going the boys wherever they are stationed. In closing I would like to say ‘hello’ to the other boys in the service and the hometown folks around Kinmundy and Alma. I noticed you received a letter from James HAMMER, who is in the Navy. I have wondered if he was still O.K. I saw him in Australia in Feb. 1942. He accompanied us on a war ship.

- Here’s one from Kenneth LEWIS S 2c who is sailing the seven seas aboard the U.S.S. Rigel. He says: I wish to express my appreciation for the paper. Although I haven’t received any recent issues due to changing addresses. I enjoy reading the home town news a lot and would like to hear from any of the boys in the service. Due to censorship, I cannot say where I am, only in the Pacific. Thanks again for the paper.

- First Lieutenant Rex S. McCARTY, 23, of Iola, Ill., co-pilot of an Eighth AAF B-17 Flying Fortress has been awarded an Oak Leaf Cluster to his Air Medal, equivalent to another award of the Medal. The award was made at an Eighth AAF Bomber Station in England. The award was for meritorious achievement while participating in bombing attacks on industries in Germany and on enemy coastal defenses and supply lines in support of the Allied invasion of France. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John M. McCARTY of Iola, Ill.

- Miss Norma MILLER, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A.H. MILLER had her tonsils removed at the Mark Greer Hospital in Vandalia, Saturday.

- Lovell Grove Church (1880) located 1 mile south of Omega, is holding an ice cream supper and bazaar Sat. Night, July 22, on the church lawn. The bazaar will consist of hand loom oven rugs, quilts, aprons and fancy work.

- Mrs. Bertha HERZBERG, 52, of Centralia died in St. Mary’s Hospital in Centralia, Thursday night. Services were held in Centralia Sunday and interment made in Evergreen Cemetery in this city. She was formerly Miss Bertha WILEY of this city.

- The MILLER-McARTOR Wedding: As we promised you last week, we contacted this couple for the particulars of their wedding but they said that enough had been said already. But the groom did tell us to tell all his friends as well as the kiddies to just drop in Bargh’s Drug Store sometime this week and have a drink on him. He has made arrangements with Mr. BARGH to this effect. So don’t disappoint him.

- Cpl. Donald PARRISH left Monday for his camp in New Mexico after spending his furlough here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A.S. PARRISH.

- Mrs. Mary PATTERSON of New York spent Thursday here with her cousin, Mrs. J.C. McCARTY. Mrs. PATTERSON also visited with other relatives, Mrs. Elmer BASSETT, Mr. and Mrs. A. NICHOLS. She is enroute to her girlhood home in Soreta, Texas.

- Green Ridge (from last week): The party for Lt. (Bill) WILLIAMS last Wednesday was attended by a large number. He returned to Texas Wednesday night.

- Green Ridge (from last week): Miss Ellen BASSETT spent part of last week with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Gage BASSETT. She has employment in St. Louis.

- Meadow Branch: Word was received that Henry McWILLIAMS was recently married to a California girl. He works for the Kaiser shipping yards near San Francisco.

- Wilson School: Mildred and Helen KLEISS attended a farewell dinner and party Sunday at the home of Mrs. Minnie HAHN near Iuka in honor of her son, Fred, of the U.S. Navy.

- Private and Mrs. Edwin SHREFFLER of South Carolina arrived here Monday to visit their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bert GARRETT and family, and Mr. and Mrs. Gordon SHREFFLER of Alma.

- East Meadow Branch (from last week): Mrs. Lois HOWELL and children, Mrs. Goldia BAYLIS and children, and Wanda GARRETT attended the birthday party Saturday in Farina at the Earl YUND home in honor of their little daughter, Barbara Fay.

- East Meadow Branch: Mrs. Mildred HAMMER of Sumner, and Mrs. Irene GAMMON spent Tuesday of last week with the former’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.F. ROBB.

- East Meadow Branch: Mrs. Esta ROBB called on Mrs. Sadie McHATTON Sunday afternoon.

July 27, 1944:

- Here’s a nice letter from Cpl. John SMITH, step-son of J.H. LEWIS. He is now in France and sent us some French money to prove it. This 5 Franc note has been laid away with the rest of our collection of foreign money. He says: Just a line to thank you for the paper and let you know how glad I am to get it. I do get lots of news from home out of it and I can see where a lot of the boys are home on furlough and boy, would I love to have one as I have been in England and now some place in France. I can say, I do not like it, but I will do my best until it is over. I was in the battle of Cherbourg and I am lucky that I am up and on the go tonight. It is now 10 o’clock and the sun is still up, but I am going to cut this letter short and go to bed as I had a hard day. I sleep in a fox hole at night, so you can see it is a good life. I would give anything to be in bed at home. Tell all the boys and girls that I love to get letters. Put my A.P.O. address in your paper and I know they will write. I get letters from my brother in Italy, Carl PURCELL and Charley DeWEESE, but I love to hear from all the boys. So thanks again for the paper and keep it rolling.

- Miss Mary Ann MAHAN of Centralia won the Marion county Scholarship at the U. of I. at Urbana, with excellent grades. She is well known here, being the daughter of John W. and Agnes FISHER MAHAN.

- Mrs. C.A. BOONE fell from a chair on Sunday, and breaking her arm.

- Memorial services will be held on July 30 at 2 p.m. in the Alma Methodist Church for Private First Class Henry O. HINKLEY, who was killed in action on Biak Island, New Guinea on June 7, 1944. No Flowers.

- Billy, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry BURGE had the misfortune to break both bones in his leg while playing at the Rea GARDEN home. He was taken to the Salem hospital.

- We have received word that way out in Arizona, they held their primary elections on Tuesday of last week and among the candidates was Clay B. SIMER of Winslow, who was successful in nosing out his opponent better than 2 to 1 for State Representative, and the nomination in that district meant the same as election. So now, Mr. and Mrs. SIMER expect to spend the winter in Phoenix, which is a wonderful winter resort. We just know that Clay will make his district a wonderful representative. He has already been called in by the Governor for conference. Clay is the son of the late Rev. and Mrs. W.J. SIMER and was reared on a farm about a mile north of Omega. He graduated from the local high school with the class of ‘18 after which he enlisted in the army in World War I. After the close of the war, he was employed by the C. & E.I. as a brakeman, and then at the Santa Fe R.R. He has been with them since, having risen to the rank of Conductor.

- Clara Mae YOUNG SMITH, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William YOUNG, was born in Livingston County on Feb. 10, 1862 and died July 7, 1944 in the Burnham City Hospital in Champaign. She was a member of the Methodist Church. On April 14, 1881, she married R.J. SMITH who died in Dec. 1940. They had 11 children, 7 boys and 4 girls, all living: Mae CRUTCHFIELD of Salem; Pearl SMITH of Farina; Robert SMITH of Salem; Raymond SMITH of Salem; Bryan of Whiting, Ind.; Otis of Forsythe; Frieda SMITHSON of Waukegan; Ota BOUSMAN of Centralia; Edwin of Hartford; Clarence of Washington, D.C.; and Martha JOHNSON of Champaign. She also leaves 1 sister, 28 grandchildren, and 35 great-grandchildren. Services were held in the Methodist Church in this city with interment in Evergreen Cemetery.

- Mrs. Harriett DeVORE has just celebrated her 92nd birthday at her home and wishes to thank her good friends for another happy event. She is enjoying good health again and received her guests in her usual friendly way. (A picture accompanied this article.)

- Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. ROBERTS of Santa Monica, Calif. announce the marriage of their daughter, Frances Ruth to Lt. James D. CONANT of the Portland Army Air Base on July 7 in the First Congregational Church. Miss Shirley BURCH of Berkley, Calif, and S.C. DeVORE of Portland, uncle of the groom, were the attendants. The bride graduated from the University of Cal. majoring in home economics. The groom is a graduate of the University of Ill. and has been in the service for 3 years. He is son of Mrs. Florence CONANT and grandson of Mrs. Harriett DeVORE of this city. They will reside in Portland, Ore.

- Keith and Loretta DISS, children of Mr. and Mrs. J.H. DISS were accompanied to Vandalia by their mother and Mrs. Jule JONES Monday where they had their tonsils removed.

- Mr. and Mrs. Robert KNEEMEYER have a daughter, Mary Kathryn, born July 14 in West Frankfort, Ill. The father is now stationed in England. Mrs. KNEEMEYER is formerly Katherine WILKINSON, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herschel WILKINSON of West Frankfort.

- Miss Florence JACK, who is attending S.I.N.U. at Carbondale spent the weekend at home.

- Pleasant Grove: Mrs. Ruby HIESTAND and Mrs. Gladys HIESTAND attended the funeral of Mrs. Sadie WALSH at the Zion Church Saturday afternoon.

- Pleasant Grove: Pvt. Roy MILLER visited the wife and children the last of the week.

- Pleasant Grove: The Home Coming and Basket Dinner will be held at Pleasant Grove Sunday July 30. Come and spend the day.

- Pleasant Grove: See MILLICAN and wife were calling on her parents, Chas. WANTLAND and wife Monday night.

- Meacham: Saturday afternoon this neighborhood was much excited about a fire on the farm known as the Jesse WILK farm. It destroyed a barn, granery and chicken house.

- Meacham: Pvt. James E. TATE, Jr. of a camp in Alabama is spending a 10 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James E. TATE. He is being transferred to a camp in Maryland.

- Miletus: Dewain WHITE and wife had a son born July 24. The father will be reporting for Army service next Monday.

- Miletus: Mr. and Mrs. Ira KRUTSINGER accompanied by Ed LACEY, his son, Maurice, and family to Flora, Sunday, to attend the funeral of Mrs. Revona JOHNSON, who died at the home of her mother in Clay City on July 20. The funeral was held at Hancock Funeral Home with interment in Elder Cemetery. Mrs. JOHNSON was daughter of Mr. Haman LACEY of Waterloo, Ill.

- Meadow Branch: Mrs. Mary PATTERSON, who has been visiting her son and family in New York City, stopped off to visit the NICHOLS and BASSETT families enroute to her home at Sarita, Texas. She is spending a few days this week with her cousin, Ira MARSHALL and wife.

- PFC Charles V. VALLOW of Camp Rucker came Sunday for a 15 day furlough with his mother, Mrs. Almelda VALLOW. Miss Jean VALLOW of St. Louis spent Sunday at home.

- Junior GARRETT is home for a few days from Illiopolis.

- Swift: Clyde BASSETT and family, Mrs. Virgil LIVESAY, Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT and daughter, Donna Mae, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth ROBB and daughter, Judith Ann, Marvin CONANT and wife attended the kitchen shower for Mr. and Mrs. Edwin SHREFFLER at the Gordon SHREFFLER home south of Alma Saturday night.

- Swift: Helen and Mary Evelyn BASSETT and Mrs. Fred GAMMON spent Sunday at the Virgil LIVESAY home.

- Swift: Mrs. Harold ROBB spent from Friday until Monday in Wisconsin with her husband, Harold ROBB.

- Swift: Clyde BASSETT and family spent Monday evening at the Billie MORRIS home.

- T5 Wydell PIGG of Scott Field was home over the weekend with his wife and children.

- Pvt. Earl SCHWABE has returned to Oklahoma City after spending a 15 day furlough with his wife and family.

- Pvt. George SHREFFLER of Nebraska is spending a furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Cecil SHREFFLER and family.

Aug. 3, 1944:

- Community Mourns Death of Cpl. Garland NORMAN and Pvt. Manuel WELCH, Killed in France:

- Mr. and Mrs. Jesse NORMAN of Meacham twp. received word Monday evening from their daughter-in-law, Mrs. Garland NORMAN of Indianapolis, Ind. stating that she had just received a message from the War Dept. announcing the death of Garland, which occurred July 13th at St. Lo, France. He was killed in action. This was a great shock to this good family as well as to the neighbors and to his many friends. Garland was a very likable chap and was loved by everyone who knew him. The heartfelt sympathy of the entire community goes out to his good family. Garland Lacey NORMAN was born in Meacham twp., Aug. 18, 1910. He attended the Lacey School and graduated from Farina High School with the class of ‘28. He finished one term of school at Normal and one term at the Univ. of Ill. In 1931, he graduated from the Lima Linotype School in Lima, Ohio. At the time of his enlistment, he was employed by the Rytx Printing Co. of Indianapolis, Ind. He married Miss Louise WILLIAMS of Indianapolis on Dec. 20, 1941. He entered the army on June 4, 1941, was temporarily released on Oct. 3, 1941, recalled on March 3, 1942 and was shipped overseas Oct. 1, 1943, landing in Northern Ireland, where stationed until a month before the invasion of France, when he was stationed in England. He went with the 1st Division in the invasion of France and was a member of the 12th Field Artillery Battalion. He participated in several major battles and was killed in action on July 13th in the battle of St. Lo. Besides his wife and parents, he leaves 4 sisters, Frances, Helen, Dorothy, and Louise and 1 brother, Charles. In all probability, memorial services will be held as soon as arrangements can be completed. (An picture accompanied this article.)

- Again a shadow of gloom was cast over the entire community yesterday when a message was received by Mr. and Mrs. G.M. WELSH from the War Dept., stating their son, Pvt. Manuel WELSH, had been killed in action in France on July 4th. As Mr. and Mrs. WELSH now reside in Flora, Mr. C.B. MENDENHALL, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. George NEAVILL, delivered it to them. Mr. and Mrs. WELSH came to Kinmundy immediately to be with their daughter-in-law in the Orie ATKINS home west of town. Pvt. Manuel Ralph WELSH was born in Coeta, Okla., Nov. 30, 1923. He came to Kinmundy with his parents in the summer of 1938. He was graduated from the local high school with the class of ‘43. He entered the service on Oct. 15, 1943, and was assigned to the infantry. He sailed for overseas duty on April 6, 1944, and was stationed in England until he entered France June 13th. He was married to Miss Mildred ATKINS, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Orie ATKINS, residing west of this city, on Feb. 19, 1944. This happy couple lived together as much as they could while Pvt. WELSH was stationed in the states. At the present time, Mrs. WELSH is making her home here with her parents. Mr. and Mrs. G.M. WELSH’s address is General Delivery, Flora. The whole community extends heartfelt sympathy to this good family. In all probability memorial services will be held in the near future to pay tribute to this lad who gave his last full measure of devotion for his country. A picture will appear in next week’s issue.

- Mrs. A.J. JACKSON has received word from her sister, Mrs. C.H. DUNCAN, telling her that their son, Col. Glenn E. DUNCAN, a flying ace is reported missing in action over France. He has been missing since July 7. Col. DUNCAN and his squadron made the first P-47 dive bombing attacks on German targets on the continent. He was also the first pilot to fly a P-47 over Berlin. Col. DUNCAN called his plane the "Dove of Peace". He had destroyed 26 German planes. Col. DUNCAN was only 26 years old.

- Mr. and Mrs. Clarence GRAY received a telegram Thursday informing them of the death of Miss Effie WESLEY, 45, a niece of Mrs. GRAY. She was a resident of Chicago and was accidently killed while waiting for a bus at the corner of Marquette Road. The bus went out of control while making a corner, and went up on the curb where Miss WESLEY and 2 other women were waiting. It came to a stop pinning her against a tree.

- Pvt. Melvin GEILER of Florida is enjoying furlough here with his family.

- Memorial Services were held Sunday in the Alma Methodist Church for Pvt. Henry O. HINKLEY, who was killed in action on Biak Island, June 7. The service included: Song - LECKRONE Sisters; Prayer - Rev. HARD; Song - Alma Trio; Message - Dr. Roy N. KEEN; Remarks - Rev. Roy E. McGRATH; Taps. Henry Otis HINKLEY was born at Elysburg, Pa., March 4, 1924. He came to Greenville, Ill. with his parents in 1930 and to Alma, Ill. in 1934. He attended the grade schools in both Greenville and Alma and was graduated from Salem H.S. with high honors with the class of ‘41. He then attended the S.I.N.U. at Carbondale until called for duty with the U.S. Armed Forces on March 5, 1943. He gave his life for his country on June 7, 1944, immediately after a beachhead had been established on Biak Island, New Guinea. He was given military burial there and memorial services were held for him in Alma on July 30, 1944. A list of those attending from a distance was included.

- Mr. and Mrs. Wm. HAMPEL and son, Lt. (jg) Wm. HAMPEL of Salem spent Saturday here with Mr. and Mrs. John HOLT.

- Here’s a nice V-Mail letter from Sgt. Raymond MOELLER, who is now in France. He says: Will write a few short lines as it has been quite some time now since I have written. I am now in France and it is kinda wet at the present time. We did have some very nice weather and it was getting quite dusty, but not to bad. In this country we are driving on the right hand side of the road again which makes it a lot nicer driving. I cannot describe the country so very much as there is not much to write about. We get to use our fox holes quite a lot and I must say that it is rather deep but at the beginning it was not so deep but ever time that the Jerrys came over, well the next day it got dug a little deeper, so now we have a roof and a lot of dirt over the top of it and we feel quite safe now. I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of my neighbors, who helped mother in any way in the time of need and I hope that some day soon I can thank each one personally. It sure was a great shock to me when I received word of Dad’s death, but we must expect things like that. Well my paper is running out so I will close for now. I have not received my paper as yet in this country. I am closing now hoping that everyone is well. I am O.K.

- Here’s a dandy letter from PFC Kenneth WILKINSON, who has been in the Southwest Pacific so long, he is beginning to look like it. He says: Hello Cobber, how’s the blokes around the Kinmundy Square, or is it square? It’s been so long since I’ve seen it they may have turned the town around. As for myself, I’m fair dinkum. You needn’t pay any attention to the Aussie slang I use. I’m so used to using it that I even write it. I picked it up from the mates around the pubs a long time ago. By the way, a pub is a place where you go for a refreshing drink. If you are lucky you might get 2 glasses of liquid known to G.I.’s as green death. I’m quite ashamed of myself for not writing to you and thanking you for the Kinmundy paper. After not receiving any mail for several weeks, I finally received several issues and decided that I had better get on the ball and at least thank you for them. They were a little old but that’s all right for a Christmas card on Easter is considered up to date. Since I last saw you, I have knocked around in the S.W. P.A. quite a bit chasing a Nip now and then. Here in the South Sea Islands, they have declared open season on them and no bag limit either. Things are pretty quiet around here now since. Whistling Charlie got his shooting iron taken away from him and Photo Joe and his flying sons of Heaven was greeted with a hot reception. Tojo has thrown everything at me but a Geisha Girl. Speaking of girls since I am about to become an inhabitant of the south sea islands, I decided to take unto myself a wife. I picked myself out a nice chocolate dish with more curves than Route 37, then I run into difficulties. First, I needed 5 lbs. and a wild pig before I could bargain with her old man. For several months I didn’t get paid then the break came, payday. Now all I needed was a pig. They told me to put salt on the pig’s tail that was a sure way, but salt was rationed and I never could catch one. So I remain a senior bachelor out Meacham way. That is enough hot stuff for now so I will sign off thanking your again for the paper.

- Mr. and Mrs. Ivan STEVENSON of Odin have a baby boy born in Salem Hospital Sunday. They now have 3 sons. The mother is formerly Dorcas GRAY, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry GRAY, Sr.

- The fire alarm was sounded Tuesday when the gasoline stove in the Frank LEE home exploded, setting fire to the kitchen. The engine arrived in due time but the bucket brigade had the blaze well under control before it’s arrival. Little damage was done.

- Sgt. Maxey SPENCER of Utah arrived Thursday for 4 days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Marshall SPENCER.

- Sparks from a C. & E.I. locomotive set fire to the right away south of town Monday and by the quick work of the neighbors and section crew, a lot of damage was avoided. The spark ignited the grass on the west side of the tracks adjoining the LENHART land. Mr. and Mrs. George LENHART happened to be in their hayfield at the time and saw the sparks fly. Mr. LENHART battled the blaze while Mrs. LENHART went for help. The neighbors responded and the section crew was soon on the job. Damage was very little.

- Green Ridge: PFC Henry E. WILLIAMS of Washington spent a 21 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Forrest WILLIAMS. He received word to go to Massachusetts and left Thursday.

- Mrs. Tom CHEADLE left for Rosate, Mo. Monday to attend the funeral of her mother, who died at her home there. She was 76.

- Miletus: The home of Ed BUTTS and wife was destroyed by fire Wednesday of last week. They did not save any of the contents.

- Miletus: On July 30 at the home of the grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. D.E. WILKINSON, the immediate family met to spend the day with Pvt. James TATE Jr. who will leave for Maryland on Tuesday. A bountiful dinner was served at the noon hour and ice cream and cake at 5 o’clock enjoyed by all present: Mrs. Otis TATE, the other grandmother, Mr. and Mrs. James TATE Sr., Mrs. Woodrow WILKINSON and mother, Mrs. Mat KING, Mr. and Mrs. Leslie WILKINSON, Mr. and Mrs. Lon HANKS, Mr. and Mrs. Retus GENTRY and family, Mr. and Mrs. Wilson STALLIONS, Mr. and Mrs. Gene GIGAR and daughter, and Miss Betty GENTRY of Chicago.

- Miletus: At the Salem Hospital July 25, Frederick Russell MISELBROOK was born. The babe and mother, returned to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert BOSTON yesterday. The father is in camp in Virginia.

- Miletus: Mrs. Dewain WHITE and 4 day old son moved to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond BANNING in Kinmundy Thursday. Dewain left for camp last night.

- East Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. A.J. BAYLIS received a letter Monday from their son, Merle, stating he is somewhere in Italy.

- Young School: Mr. and Mrs. Lester VANSCYOC and family, Mr. and Mrs. Cal LANE, Mr. and Mrs. Cecil LANE and sons, Mr. and Mrs. Virl SEE and daughter were entertained to Sunday dinner at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Earl LANE in the honor of their birthdays, Mrs. LANE’s being on Friday and Mr. LANE’s on Sunday. We didn’t ask these folks how old they were so you will have to figure that out for yourself, unless you happen to know.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. Denver WILKINSON held a family reunion at their home Sunday in honor of Pvt. James E. TATE, Jr. who is home on furlough from Alabama and is being changed to a camp in Maryland.

- Meacham: Fire burned the farm home of Mr. and Mrs. Ed BUTTS Wednesday evening. Nearly all furniture was destroyed. It started from an oil stove.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. Carol ALLEN and son of Lombard, Ill. have moved their household goods to the home of her mother, Mrs. Dora HEICHER, as Mr. ALLEN is being inducted into the army. They also spent a few days in Farina with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank ALLEN.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. Edwin HARRELL were Sunday dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. F.S. HARRIS.

- Omega: Mr. and Mrs. Halice LEWIS have a baby girl named Linda Kay who was born at Salem Hospital, Sunday.

- Pleasant Grove: A large crowd attended the Homecoming and Basket Dinner at Pleasant Grove Sunday. Rev. and Mrs. WIGHAM of Coffeen, Ill. were with us. Bro. WIGHAM brought the message both morning and afternoon on account of the Memorial Services at Alma for PFC Henry HINKLEY. Brother HORD was unable to be there in afternoon, although Mrs. HORD and daughters were there to help with the program.

- Pleasant Grove: Pvt. Roy MILLER of Scott Field visited with his family one day last week.

- Pleasant Grove: Pvt. Paul SMITH of Kentucky spend weekend at the Ralph HIESTAND home.

- Pleasant Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Jack BARKSDALE attended a childrens program at Young Church Sunday night where Mrs. BARKSDALE’s orchestra pupils played a few numbers. The children were accompanied by their parents. A nice program was enjoyed. The orchestra also played at Pleasant Grove Sunday afternoon.

- Meadow Branch: Mrs. Verne SCHOONOVER went to Norman, Oklahoma last week to visit with her husband, who is stationed there.

- Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Jess WOODEN gave a party last Monday night in honor of their daughter, Vodma’s 18th birthday.

- Corp. Florence DOOLEN, a WAC in the U.S. Army has moved from North Africa to Italy. Florence is the daughter of Mrs. Effie ROBB of this city.

- Mr. and Mrs. Cliff OLDEN spent the weekend in Miss. with Pvt. Bruce OLDEN, who is stationed there.

- Wednesday night, July 26, the 4-H Future Homemakers and their parents enjoyed a party at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Claude HANNA, where ice cream and cake was served. Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. Clyde GARRETT and daughters, Mr. and Mrs. Elvin CONANT and children, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde BASSETT and daughter, Mrs. Lela HELPINGSTINE and daughters, Mrs. Dorothy GARRETT and family, Mrs. Loreta JONES and children, and Marjorie, Donna and Mona CONANT. Guests were: Roy EDMAN, Floyd and Wanda GARRETT. At a late hour all departed thanking Mr. and Mrs. HANNA for a delightful time. Evelyn BASSETT, Reporter.

- Mr. and Mrs. Fred GAMMON and Mrs. Robert HANNA and Billy attended the show in Farina Saturday evening.

Aug. 10, 1944:

- Here’s a nice letter from PFC Lawrence H. BASSETT, who has been in the South West Pacific for quite sometime. He says: The usual thing as usual, I have been intending to write but just put it off. That is very easy to do as you cannot write everything you would like to. Some things if you wrote about, they would only be cut out so what is the use of writing in the first place. Your letter would have looked like the mice got ahold of it. As I have been getting the paper for some time and have put off writing, hope you will excuse me this time. Hope this finds everyone in good health, especially around the mansion. The papers you have been sending have been coming along alright so far. Only when I was in New Guinea, they were slightly slow, but they came and that was what counted. There is plenty of news in the home town paper that I wouldn’t know about if it wasn’t for your thoughtfulness in sending me and the other boys the home town news. As you know by now, I also have a brother over here on this side of the Pacific. I have been over here about the same length of time he has. Been hoping to run into him some time, but that hasn’t happened yet. I have seen all the Islands of the Pacific I care to see. It will do me for a mighty long time. It may be nice to some people where it never snows, but for myself, I would rather see some snow once in a while. Long as I have been over here, I have only seen ice twice. Still in all, it could have been lots worse. I have been gone from my old outfit for some time now. Sure would like to run into some of the boys from there and also some from home. I have seen the TROUT boy twice since I came over. He is the only one. There are plenty of others over here, as I get letters from home telling me or see it in the home town paper. I will bring this bit of chatter to a stop. Good luck to you all.

- Here’s one from PFC Leland B. ALDERSON, who is stationed in New Mexico. He says: I would like to write a few lines to all those people at home that are interested in the care given their service men in a Convalescent Center. The mere fact that your serviceman is in a Convalescent Training Program is assurance that the soldier, about whom you may be worried, is well on his road to recovery. Similar to a General Hospital we are equipped to give the very best of medical attention. The physicians commissioned in the Army make up a great range of professional specialists, such as surgical, diagnostic, eye, ear, nose, and throat, Anesthetist and Psycho analysts. Each group having a complete staff including nurses and technicians. The pharmaceutical preparations at the disposal of the physicians for the treatment and cure of the patients, include not only the always reliable herbs, but also those of the more recent type, as penicillin and the sulfa drugs. Until recently there was no place in the Army for that in between stage of slow recuperation. A patient either stayed in the hospital itself, bored stiff, until he was discharged for active duty, or in some cases, he was given a 2 week convalescent furlough before returning to the hospital for his discharge. In the latter case, he often stood for hours in a weakened condition on a crowded train or bus. Once home, his activities were anything but "what the doctor ordered", with the result that he returned in as bad a physical condition as when he left. Thus experience has shown that he will be immeasurably better off if he convalesces under the direct Army supervision. The new Convalescent Training Program has changed this extremely trying period which often proved very dull and disgusting when one was forced to count the cracks in the wall to occupy his mind, to a schedule of activities, especially pointed to the development of both mind and body. The schedule has been filled with pleasurable instructions in such things as in the Arts and Crafts Department, for wood and leather work, plastics, pottery, modeling, weaving, and painting. In the Physical Training Dept., horse back riding, volley ball, badminton, basketball, softball, and archery are offered in addition to an inviting scheduled rest camp in the quiet of the mountains. Instruction in map reading, gas warfare, camouflage, booby traps, typing, bookkeeping, Spanish and Latin, as well as English, shorthand, and mathematics, that is, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry are offered on the Education Program. All these subjects are organized into a well balanced program for each individual patient, making each day as entertaining as possible. Other entertainment is found at the Post Theater, USO shows, movies, special program by the University of New Mexico and the Red Cross. The Air Force has designed this convalescent training program to assist the soldier in making the very best physical, social and economic re-adjustment possible. I might add that detailed as this or any program can be, there is nothing that can take the place of letters and news from home.

- Word has been received that WAC Florence DOOLEN has been awarded the Good Conduct Medal along with 8 other girls of the company on July 29. This award was made by Major Bouetell of the WAC Bat. who was formerly the Company Commander.

- Lt. and Mrs. Carl PRUETT of Michigan are spending their leave here with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.S. PRUETT.

- In Memoriam of our son and brother, Orvel BURKETT, who died Aug. 7, 1943. The Frank BURKETT family.

- The 4-H Future Homemakers met with Betty Ann and Virginia Lee HELPINGSTINE, Aug. 2, with 11 members and 1 guest present. The business included interesting talks on cooking, canning, and First Aid. Refreshments were then served after which recreation was enjoyed. The next meeting will be Aug. 16th. Evelyn BASSETT, Reporter.

- A few friends surprised Mr. and Mrs. E.E. BROWN Tuesday in honor of their 30th wedding anniversary, with a picnic supper at the I.C. Lake. Upon their arrival at the lake, a mock wedding was held. After eating, they went to the BROWN home where the remainder of the evening was spent in entertainment. This was a complete surprise to the BROWN’s, but the daughters were in on the secret.

- The Board of Education of the Kinmundy Community High School has been rather busy the past week in getting their teachers employed the coming term. Just about the time they figured they had all the teachers, before the first of August, some other school would hire them. But now if they accept a position, they must stick to it. The following teachers have been employed: J. Harley HAYES, Supt.; Miss Ruth LEMMEL, English; W.E. WILLIAMS, Agriculture; Miss Mabel BREWER of Springfield, Ky., Commercial; Miss Roberta HOPPER of Herrin, Ill, History and Language; Mrs. Richard BROOM, History and English; Miss Elsie MILLER of St. Louis, Science and Mathematics; Mrs. Reta HAWKINS of Salem, Home Economics. A music teacher is yet to be employed.

- Ice Cream Supper Well Attended: The ice cream supper of Sandy Branch for the benefit of the cemetery last Wednesday night was well attended. Net proceeds amounted to $58.00. Donations amounting to $17.00 were also received. Donations for the supper were: 35 pounds of sugar by W.S. PRUETT and 1000 lbs. of ice by Bud ROBNETT. This money is to be used to keep the cemetery clean. The committee wishes to thank all who helped. (A full treasurer’s report will be published later.)

- Swift School: Elsworth CHANDLER and family of Weston are here for a week’s vacation with relatives.

- Swift School: Paul MONTGOMERY went to Flora Wednesday night where he left for Chicago to be inducted into the army.

- Swift School: A large crowd attended the ice cream supper at Sandy Branch Wednesday night. 20 gallons of homemade ice cream and 20 gallons of city ice cream were sold. Several from Salem, Alma, Vernon and Kinmundy were present.

- Swift School: Clyde BASSETT and wife were in Centralia Sunday afternoon attending the funeral of Mrs. Joe THOMAS. Mr. and Mrs. THOMAS formerly lived on the Lee BABOR farm.

- Swift School: Evelyn and Helen BASSETT spent Sunday afternoon with Virginia Lee HELPINGSTINE.

- Swift School: Darrell Gene LIVESAY spent Sunday in Kinmundy with Bill JACKSON at the Chas. GAMMON home.

- Meacham: The C.B. Circle held their second ice cream party Sunday evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin HARRELL with 32 present. It was an ideal evening for ice cream and all enjoyed it very much. Miss Florence STORRS was a welcome guest.

- Sgt. Elwin INGRAM spent the weekend with his mother, Mrs. Agnes INGRAM.

Aug. 17, 1944:

- Here’s a V-Mail from PFC Harvey JOHNSTON, son of Mr. and Mrs. Grover JOHNSTON, who has seen plenty of action in Saipan. He says: Well now I have a little time and will write you a line for the paper. I guess you know all about the bloody battle of Saipan and I was all through that battle, and I am thanking the Lord for being alive today. I fought 3 weeks on the lines and there isn’t much fun in it when every minute of it means you life. The men that fought on this island really have went through hell. It was the worst battle in the Pacific yet. I am still here on the island and things are quieting now down now, all but a few snipers. I haven’t received a paper for quite some time, but you can’t expect much in these places. Well, I will be home some day to see you all again, so am saying hello to all until then. So this will be all now, as I can’t say much and thank you again for the paper. Keep them coming. Good luck to all.

- Here’s one from PFC Theodore TROUT, better known to us as "Tuffy", who is still somewhere in the Southwest Pacific area. He says: I will start this by saying I am very sorry that I have not written to you sooner, but there is no better time than right now to thank you for sending me the paper. I really and truly enjoy it and hope that it will be continued to be sent to me. I hope by now that mother has payed for it for at least a year, by the end of that time, I hope to be home. Mr. VALLOW, I will sure hand it to you when it comes to writing something about "Mother’s Day". It was very good and I am sure you was writing it with some feeling and a lot of meaning. There is no one who can take the place like mother. I am very lucky in that respect. I have a lady who means just as much to me as mother, as you know her and Chick. There is no one who could take their place. And have you ever taught Chick to play cards yet? I see in the paper where Mrs. JOHNSON and Mrs. CURRY have been helping you with the paper in their spare time. I think it is very nice of them. They always think of others. Mrs. CURRY used to always have a smile for everyone. She is a very good friend to every one. There is a very close censorship now, so I cannot tell you much of what is going on over here. But as you say, a little cold weather would be nice after 3 years of summer. If it was to get cold, I suppose I would freeze to death. For the past 3 years it has never been too cold to go without a shirt. Swimming in December and January. It don’t seem right, does it? I had better close for now, for it is getting late and almost time for lights out, but before closing, I want to thank you again for the paper. So until next time it is ‘Cheerio’ in Aussie talk and ‘So-long’ in the Yank way.

- Here’s one from John SEE, R M 2 c, who is sailing the seven seas aboard the U.S.S. Pawnee. He says: As I haven’t written you for nearly a year, I think it is about time to write and let you know I am still getting the paper and want to thank you very much for it. I got 2 issues today, which were about 6 weeks old, but nevertheless, they contained a lot of news items and so on, that I hadn’t already heard. I just finished reading the letter that Charles JASPER wrote and wish to say that it was as interesting a letter as I’ve read in a long time. I’m not even going to try and compete with him. I sure wish I could see a different section of the world but it seems my fate to sit here and look at cocoanut trees until I think I’ll go crazy. I will say that I am fortunate enough to be on a ship that gets under way occasionally and not on a shore station. Even if all the islands are the same, sometimes one island has a little different inlet or harbor that breaks the monotony. There has been nothing happened for me of interest until around the first of the year when I had a good opportunity to see the continent from down under. A lot of fellows from around home have been here but I’ll venture to say none of them had a better time than I did. Although I just had 6 days ashore, I really made them count and in that short time (which passed like hours), I spent very little of it aboard ship. If you want to know the real layout of Australia, just ask Red HAMMER. I’ve heard from various sources that his former ship spent a lot of time around here, "How about it, Red?" I didn’t take long to find out that a ‘Yank’ sailor rated tops with all the people in this city. As long as you had plenty of American cigarettes and occasional stick of gum, you could have more girl friends than HEINZ has pickles. I remember 1 incident where 2 fellows and myself went for a little cab ride throughout the city for an entire morning. We didn’t know whether we would have enough money to pay for the ride as it came to over 10 bucks of our money. I took a wild chance when the cabbie told us what the fare was, I stuck a carton of Chesterfield cigarettes under his nose and asked him if it was enough and nearly broke his arm reaching for them. By the way, the cigarettes only cost me fifty cents. My only difficulty was keeping on the correct side of the streets in waiting for a car or tram. One night I waited for about a half hour on a slightly used street for a tram before it dawned on me that I was on the wrong side. I had forgotten all about 1944 being leap year until I had about 3 proposals. I understand there is some sort of law or something there about having to know the girl 6 months before you marry her but that still wouldn’t have made any difference to me. That will do for my little trip to Australia until I get back and then tell you personally a few of my exploits. And incidentally most of them were very amusing to most of the fellows after we got back aboard and started discussing what we had done. Recently I read in ‘Zatso’ about the measurement of your 2 sons. We have one guy on here that will nearly compare to them. He says he had lost a lot of weight since he came in the Navy, but we still give him the horse laugh every time he says that. I just returned from looking out to see how the movie is coming along, and trying to think of something else to write about but still didn’t help, so I guess that is a good indication that I should close for this time for this time. So in closing, thanks again for the paper and some of these days, I’ll drop you a few lines and enclose a few shackles to help cover the cost of editing and sending your paper overseas. I imagine the Navy guys know why we’re all pretty well broke at present.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Charles DISS, who heads his letter, "Somewhere in England". Hey says: Well, it’s been quite some time since I have written, so since I have some time tonight, I thought I had better write a few lines because we are pretty busy over here through the week. I celebrated my first birthday out of the States yesterday and I must say it was a very quiet one. We went on a sight seeing tour today and saw some, very interesting places. We visited one famous old abbey and also an old castle. The country is very beautiful around here in this section. It was sure hard at first to drive on the left side of the road but we are getting accustomed to it now and it isn’t so bad. They have very good roads but they are sure narrow and have plenty of blind corners, but everything has gone O.K. so far. On my trip over, the first night out I met Willard WILEY and also Harry NORRIS, a boy from Salem, I knew. So we had a nice trip over and I have enjoyed every bit of my journey so far. But we have a little ways to go yet that may get a little tougher, but that’s what we are all here for and we are all anxious to go ahead so we can soon start back to the good old U.S.A. Oh yes, when I first got here in this camp, I met a lot of the boys I had taken basic training with in California and I hadn’t seen them since we all left out there. It sure was a surprise as they didn’t know where I had gone from out there and visa versa. We had traveled quite a few males since we had seen each other. So we are having quite a time over here in this jolly ole country, as these English say. My APO has changed again since I left the States so I’ll enclose it. Well, I guess this is all for now, so until the next time, Cherrio.

- In Memoriam of Mrs. Agnes HINES who died Aug. 20, 1943.

- Memorial Held Sunday For Pvt. Manuel WELSH: Services were held Sunday afternoon in the Methodist Church in this city in memory of Pvt. Manuel WELSH, who was killed in action in France on July 4th. The church overflowing with relatives and friends and the large profuse of beautiful flowers were emblematical of the profound sorrow of the citizens of this community and the sympathy for the bereaved family. The services were conducted by Rev. Lisle E. MEWMAW, pastor. J. Harley HAYES, supt. of the local schools also made a few remarks regarding the life of this soldier as he knew him. Mrs. W.B. VALLOW and Mrs. J. N. VALLOW sang 2 songs with Mrs. Pauline JOHNSON at the instrument. Taps were sounded by Duane HANNA, S3 c, and members of the American Legion constituted the firing squad. It was truly a beautiful, but sad, service. But it was the only way in which the community had of paying tribute to the memory of one who gave his last full measure of devotion for his country. Manuel R. WELSH, only son of Mr. and Mrs. George Manuel WELSH, was born at Coweta, Okla. on Nov. 22, 1922. He graduated from Kinmundy H.S. with the class of ‘43, was noted for his ability in basketball, baseball, and other sport activities, and acted as assistant coach of the local elementary school in ‘42 and ’43. He was called for duty in the U.S. Armed Forces on Oct. 15, 1943. On Feb. 19, 1944 he married Miss Mildred ATKINS, who resides west of Kinmundy. In April 1944, he sailed for the overseas, entering France in June. It was there that he gave his life for his country on July 4, 1944. He was a young man of high character, respected and liked by his great number of friends. Great was the sacrifice he made for his loved ones at home. He is survived by his wife, Mildred, his parents, who now live in Flora, and 1 grandmother. (A picture accompanied this article.)

- James Luther DAVIS was born near Kinmundy on June 29, 1869, and died in Chicago on Aug. 11, 1944. Luther, was the eldest son of Isaac Newton DAVIS and Margaret Ann GRAY DAVIS. A younger brother, John H. N. DAVIS, survives. A sister, Mattie BOSLEY, died in 1906. In 1891, he married Margaret MORRIS and they spent almost 53 years together. For many years they lived in or near Kinmundy where all their children were born. In 1927 they moved to Chicago. Two years ago, he suffered a stroke. For several years they made their home with their daughter, Lauralee NELSON. Two of his sons, Gray and Roy, lived in the same neighborhood. When Roy entered the U.S. Army, he was proud of this service his youngest son could render to his country. Roy recently enjoyed a 10 day furlough and his father was able to attend the service when his youngest granddaughter was christened, and also on July 30th when Roy occupied the pulpit. The eldest son, Rev. H. Morris DAVIS, is at present confined in a hospital in Indianapolis and couldn’t attend the funeral. An infant daughter, Mae Elizabeth, preceded him in death. There are 12 grandchildren and 3 great-grandchildren. In his early years he became a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, later transferring to the Methodist Church. Services were held at the chapel on Wolcott Ave. in Chicago. The body accompanied by Mrs. DAVIS and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Harry NELSON and son, Gray DAVIS, and Rev. John CHEEK of Chicago, and son, T 5 Roy DAVIS of Texas, arrived here Monday. Final services were held in the local Methodist Church with interment in Evergreen Cemetery under the direction of the Masonic Lodge of which he had been a member for 40 years.

- Mrs. James GLOSER, nee Rosella STEADMAN, died in her home in Terre Haute, Ind. on Sunday. Services were held there Wednesday and the remains brought to Kinmundy and laid to rest in Evergreen Cemetery. The deceased was born and reared in this community. Mr. and Mrs. Ed COLEMAN of St. Louis came to Kinmundy Sunday to help make arrangements for the burial services. Mrs. COLEMAN was a sister to the deceased.

- Lee Ola KELSO, 22, of Goldthwaite, Texas, and Lt. Walter (Bill) WILLIAMS, formerly of Kinmundy, were married July 27 at Pecos, Texas. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.J. KELSO of Goldthwaite, Texas. She complete a year of Business College and held a position as secretary in Goldthwaite for 3 years, but recently accepted a position as stenographer at the Post in Pecos. The groom is son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy J. WILLIAMS, residing west of Kinmundy, and graduated from Kinmundy H.S. with the class of ‘40, later enlisting as a cadet in the Army Air Force and received his wings June 27, 1944. After a short furlough, the newlyweds departed for Florida to a Replacement Center. (A picture accompanied this article.)

- Mr. and Mrs. Cecil BAILEY have received word from their son, Pvt. Lloyd BAILEY, stating he is in a hospital recovering from a wound received in action in France. He says he is doing alright and for them not to worry about him.

- Cadet Annette VALLOW returned to her work in St. Louis Wednesday after spending 4 days here with her parents.

- Wilson School (from last week): Pvt. George MEYER of Oklahoma came Saturday for a 2 week furlough with his parents and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Chris MEYER and daughters.

- Omega (from last week): It is reported that George FISK has sold his store here to his son, Loyd, and will work on the C. & E.I. Railroad as a fireman.

- Mrs. Hattie COCKRELL and Mrs. Elizabeth ATKINS spent Wednesday in Salem with Mrs. Lillie ROGERS.

- Prairie Grove (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Elno HOHLT entertained to dinner Thursday in honor of her 2 nephews, Pvt. Robert N. WILKINSON of Oregon and Wendell WILKINSON of Great Lakes. Present were: Mr. and Mrs. Harold VON BEHREN, Mrs. Minnie NORMAN, and Mrs. Ruth WILKINSON and sons, Norman and Wendell.

- Prairie Grove (from last week): Mrs. Imogen McCARTY entered Vandalia Hospital Monday to have her tonsils removed.

- Young School (from last week): Mrs. Lawrence PERRY was taken to Salem Hospital Tuesday and underwent an operation for appendicitis on Wednesday.

- Mr. and Mrs. Ray SCHOOLEY entertained their son, Glen and 2 soldier friends from Camp Ellis over the weekend.

- Meacham: Mrs. Mary BALKE is at home after an extended stay in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse NORMAN. Mrs. NORMAN was very ill last week with a heart attack.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. E.G. DILLON attended funeral services Tuesday for Luther DAVIS.

- First Lieut. Rex McCARTY, son of Marshall McCARTY, of Iola, Ill., returned to Reception Station No. 9 after 31 missions and 221 combat flying hours against the enemy in 5 months overseas. He was among those who raided the French coast when our forces invaded on D-Day. He also engaged in shuttle raids to Russia and Italy. Most opposition was met on raids which made deep penetrations into Germany. He recalls a raid over Kiel as his most dangerous one due to adverse flying conditions. He is possessor of the Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal with 3 citations and European Theatre of Operations Award. A graduate of Kinmundy H.S., McCARTY was employed by Curtiss-Wright Corp. in Buffalo, N.Y. when he entered the service Sept. 10, 1942. Rex visited his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J.C. McCARTY and friends here last Wednesday.

- Meadow Branch: Mrs. Robert FRYE, who has spent a few weeks with her husband in Virginia, came home a week ago Monday, will go with her parents to St. Louis to live.

- Walter WARREN has found employment in St. Louis and he and his wife move there in a few days.

- The Shriver Sewing Sircle met at the home of Geneva CHARLTON Friday the 11th with all members present except 2. The meeting was called to order by Doris SMITH. America was sang and the Pledge of Allegiance was given. Talks were made by Nadine CHARLTON on "Colds", Rosalie ALDERSON on "A Girl and her Hair", Phyllis MILLER on "Fabrics", and Geneva CHARLTON on "____ of Sewing". The remainder of the afternoon was spent sewing on their dress and playing games. Ice tea and cookies were served by the hostess. Present were: Deloris SULLIVAN, Doris, Nadine, and Roberta SMITH, Lois, Phyllis and Mary Jane MILLER, Rojean and Rosalie ALDERSON, Mary Ann and Nadine CHARLTON. Guests were: Harriet MILLER, Paula SMITH, Mrs. SIMMONS, and Mrs. Jess CHARLTON. The next meeting will be Aug. 18 at the MILLER girls home. Lois MILLER, Reporter.

Aug. 24, 1944:

- Here’s a nice letter from Cpl. Louie SOUTIER, who entered France on the day of invasion and has been there ever since. He says: Well, at last I guess I will write you a few lines. Been aiming to write you for quite awhile, but just never got to it. Well, I have been receiving your paper pretty regular since I have been here in France. Sure enjoy reading it. I like to read the letters the other boys write. I have been here in France what seems like a long time, but it hasn’t been but a little over 2 months and it is quite a long time when a lot of your time has been spent in a foxhole, but it is the best place at times. Well, I have seen quite a bit since I have been here. Most of the cities are tore up so you can’t tell what they looked like. The French people here are friendly, only you can’t understand them for most of them speak French, only a few can talk English. As for France, it is about like England - it rains all the time. Only last week it didn’t rain here and I think it is the first week that it didn’t rain since I have been overseas. Well, I am on the second drive over here. You may read something about them. I don’t know whether they mention what divisions are fighting here or not. The first month we were here, we lived on K rations, but now we get regular army rations. I sure was glad when we got them for the K rations get pretty old when you eat them for awhile. I have never seen any of the fellows from around home yet, but there are several of them around here. I have run on to a lot of boys from Salem and Centralia here. The French here have a lot of stock, cows and horses, but they are a little behind time on their farming. Well, I enjoy reading your Zatso column and the other boys like to read it and they all think it is pretty good. It don’t look like the war here will last too long, sure hope not, for it will be good to get back to the U.S.A. again. I have been gone, almost a year, and I know that it is not as long as a lot of the boys have been gone and at that it sure seems like a long time. Well, I guess I have written enough for this time. I sure want to thank you for sending me the paper for I certainly enjoy it, and I get a lot of news I would never hear about. Well so long and hope to see you all soon.

- The old Southern Methodist church has been torn down and hauled away. This marks the passing of another old landmark. According to records found in the cornerstone of the old church, it must have been erected by a Presbyterian Congregation because in the lead container, which as poorly sealed was found a Presbyterian Catechism. Along with this was a hymn book without music, a bible printed in 1830, a silver half dollar made in 1853, and some documents written in long hand. Water had seeped into the container and the writing on these documents were not legible. From all appearances, one document gave the charter members of the church and the other one a brief history of it. So according to this information, the church must have been erected sometime back in the 50's by the Presbyterians and later sold to the Southern Methodist Congregation. It was sold a few years ago to the Baptist Congregation. But this congregation was disbanded and the church became the property of the State Baptist Association. The church was donated to the South Hill Baptist Congregation southeast of Greenville with the proviso that they tear it down and erect another church. The last load left here Thursday.

- Memorial services will be held in the Methodist Church in Farina on Aug. 27 for Cpl. Garland NORMAN, who as killed in action in France on July 13.

- Wednesday evening found J.A. BROOM with several unpacked peaches in and around his packing shed. His help had been working late every night and were pretty well tired out. In order to give a rest, he sent out an appeal for more help. The Lions Club of Salem, several people from Alma, and the Chamber of Commerce and other citizens of Kinmundy responded. A list of those helping was included.

- The following program is for the Achievement Day or Style Show for the Shriver Sewing Sircle to be held at the Shriver School house on Aug. 30: 4-H Pledge; Music - Orchestra; March - Nadine SMITH; Solo - Geneva CHARLTON; Recitation - Nadine SMITH; Song - Rosalie and Rojean ALDERSON; March - Roberta SMITH; Demonstration on Hems - Naomi SIMMONS; Violin Solo - Lois Jean MILLER; Song - Delorese PHYLIS; Song - MILLER twins; Piano Solo - Doris SMITH; Talk "Color and Color Harmony" - Mary Ann CHARLTON; Recitation - Pauline JONES. Refreshments of iced tea and cookies. Please bring cookies. Everyone invited. Hazel MAXEY and Mabel SMITH, Leaders.

- We are in receipt of information from the War Dept. stating that Tec. 5, James E. HANKS, is returning from 31 months overseas in the Southwest Pacific Theater of Operations and was to arrive on Aug. 22 at Ft. Sheridan, Ill. prior to reaching his home to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Guy HANKS and family, residing southeast of this city.

- Mr. and Mrs. Albert MOELLER and son, PFC Harold, residing north of Arnold’s Chapel, spent Friday afternoon visiting the Editorial Mansion. PFC Harold has been a patient in the Percy Jones Hospital in Battle Creek, Mich., and has formed an undying friendship with our son, Tec. 5 Joseph Guin VALLOW. He is home on furlough and will leave this week for a camp in Texas. Mr. and Mrs. MOELLER have another son, PFC Willard, who is seeing quite a bit of combat service in the Southwest Pacific area for several months where he contracted malaria and was sent back to the states to recuperate. He is feeling fine again and will probably be assigned to another unit upon his arrival in camp.

- Peach picking time was mentioned again, and how Mr. BROOM of Alma is about the largest grower in Illinois having 160 acres and has employed 200 people to help in the crop. The article told of what all has to be done this time of year.

- Mr. and Mrs. Dwight PURCELL of Alma, received a telegram from the War Dept. last week announcing their son, Sgt. Carl E. PURCELL, had been seriously wounded in action in France, on Aug. 1st. A little encouragement was received Thursday when the family received a letter from Sgt. Carl dated Aug. 6th. Then on Friday they received another letter written by him on Aug. 10th saying he was in a hospital in England. He did not tell them the nature of his wound but says he was slightly injured and it was nothing to worry about. That he was living the best since going overseas. We are all consoled in the fact the Sgt. Carl was able to write these letters himself which gives evidence that his wound could have been much worse, and that he was feeling good enough to write. Naturally the family will not rest easy until such time when they get the full particulars.

- East Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Dale HAMMER and children of Sumner visited Sunday with her parents, W.F. ROBB and wife, and Harold and wife.

- East Meadow Branch: Mrs. W.F. ROBB and Mrs. Velma ROBB went to Effingham Friday and met T3 Harold W. ROBB of Wisconsin, who spent a few days at the home of his parents. He returned to camp Sunday evening.

- East Meadow Branch: Mrs. Velma ROBB visited last week at the W.F. ROBB home.

- Miss Pearl ARNOLD of Springfield is here a few days with her mother, Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD and Miss Ruby.

- Sherman: Mr. and Mrs. Glen JAHRAUS are rejoicing over the arrival of a son who will answer to the name of Glenn Dale.

- Mr. and Mrs. C.H. VALLOW, Mr. and Mrs. J.N. VALLOW spent Sunday afternoon in Brownstown with relatives, Mrs. Elnora RODE, whose only son, Albert, was killed in action in France July 15. They were accompanied by Misses Evageline and Ella PARRILL, who visited with their sister, Mr. and Mrs. Henry SPECKER.

- Mr. and Mrs. Archie PATHEL of Crete spent a short time here last week with Mr. and Mrs. Harve BRANSON and attended the funeral of Mr. PATHEL’s father.

- East Meadow Branch (from last week): Mrs. Liz ATKINS spent Monday with Mrs. Esta ROBB and assisted in getting dinner for the threshers.

- East Meadow Branch (from last week): We have received that Clifton LEMAY is now PFC (Private First Class).

- East Meadow Branch (from last week): Pvt. Charles BERRY of Arkansas is here for a 7 day furlough with his family.

- PFC Darrell REESE of New York and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Alex HAIG and son, Tommy of Caseyville spent Sunday with Jesse REESE and family. Mr. and Mrs. Lowell REESE were evening callers.

- Mrs. Wayne E. JONES was in Rantoul Saturday visiting with her husband, Capt. JONES. She was accompanied home by Mr. and Mrs. Ray PETTIBON and Mrs. E.J. BISHOP Sunday, who spent the day here. Mrs. JONES and son will go to Rantoul next month to make their home as Capt. JONES has again been stationed at Chanute Field.

- East Zion: Mr. and Mrs. Reid SMITH and son, Donnie and daughter, Helen of Elwin, Ill. spent Monday night and Tuesday at Chas. ARNOLD home.

- Several attended the birthday surprise dinner for Charles PERRY Sunday at his home.

- Mr. and Mrs. Herman SCHNEIDER have received word that their son, Pvt. Merl SCHNEIDER, has landed safely in New Guinea.

- Pleasant Grove: Mrs. Harriet MILLER and children took her husband back to Scott Field Tuesday after a short visit at home.

- Pvt. John GUNN spent Tuesday here with his cousin, Mrs. Charlotta HEINRICHS. Pvt. GUNN was enroute from his home in Oklahoma to Camp Ellis.

- PFC Ervin SCHNEIDER returned to his camp in Texas after a 12 day furlough here with his wife and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Herman SCHNEIDER and family.

- Meadow Branch: Pvt. Chas. BERRY came Saturday to spend his furlough with his wife at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer BUTTS, also his own parents, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer BERRY. He will return to his camp in Arkansas, Thursday.

- Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Ira MARSHALL received word Friday that their son, Robert, had undergone an operation for appendicitis in the hospital where he is stationed in California.

- Swift School: Clyde BASSETT and family and Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT called on Selby GARRETT and wife near Alma Sunday afternoon.

- Swift School: T. Sgt. Harold ROBB of Wisconsin spent the weekend here with his wife, Velma Jean CONANT.

- Cpl. Harold KLEISS of North Carolina arrived here this morning to spend his furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred KLEISS and daughters.

Aug. 31, 1944:

- Here’s a nice letter from Cpl. Carl CRAIN, who is in France or was on Aug. 20th when this letter was written. He says: I have been contemplating on writing you this letter for some time but just never got around to it. So, before I go any farther, I would like to thank you from the bottom of my heart. I don’t believe you can realize just how much the home town paper means to all the boys that have been away from home as long as I have. It will soon be 3 years since I left the good old U.S.A. and during all that time we have been tactical set-up. I’ve seen men die, Mr. VALLOW, and that is something you can’t forget. I really get a kick out of the boys back there wanting to come over here. I did too, once, but now I’d give anything in the world just to get back where it is peaceful and quiet. I know they think they could be more use over here, but someone has to be there as well as here. They really don’t know how lucky they are. Well, Mr. VALLOW, we can’t take much time to write so I’ll close thanking you again for the paper.

- Here’s another nice letter from PFC Theodore TROUT, better known as "Tuffy". He is still in the Southwest Pacific Theater and wrote this letter on some very peculiar looking paper. He says: I will try to send you a few lines to let you know that I am still receiving the paper. It has been coming through when the letters are not. There has been very few letters lately, but the good old paper brings the news. I want to take the time to thank you for sending me the paper. I am sure that all the boys enjoy the paper as much as I do. I enjoy the letters from the other boys and the column Zatso is really interesting. Of course, there are lots of other things like the news and the happenings of the fair city. I really enjoyed the verses by Lt. ARNOLD, those verses have a lot of meaning. They are something she can be proud of. More than one fellow has asked to read them. Speaking of verses, not long ago you wrote about your mother. Those few lines sure brought back some memories. I kept them until I was in action and somewhere I lost them. That reminds me of a few lines I sent my mother before I went into action. I will inclose them they are not much to any one else, but to me they mean a lot. As you can see this is Jap paper. You know he had this but couldn’t use it so I took it - a dead man can’t write. I had better bring this letter to a close as it is getting late. So again I will thank you for the paper and I hope to see you soon. Tell everyone hello for me.

- Here’s one from Tec. 5, Edward JEZEK, who is in France. He dated his letter Aug. 10 and has this to say. It has been some time since I wrote you. So, now I can’t see any reason why, for it is a beautiful day, sun shining and a nice breeze, but one can’t get to comfortable in writing for we have to duck now and then. I will try to give you a brief idea of where I have been, what I have seen and done. First of all, I have been in half of the states, most of them Eastern ones, but none has been so nice as ours. Altho, they have their good points as we have. So much for that. I was in England for some time, found it very interesting in historical places. As I had always heard we had this and that in the old country, while here I had the opportunity to visit London. Quite some place, not as good as ours, but they certainly do have some good subways. I was told the best in the world, and on top of that they are used for several purposes, such as air raid shelters, transportation and other reasons. I also visited ‘Big Ben’, Buckingham Palace, the Whispering Gallery, London Bridge, and several other places that I’ll tell you about on my return home. Probably the other boys over here have told you the rest so I’ll not finish with it. For France, it is one terrible place, only God and Uncle Sam’s ground forces will know what is going on until after the war is over. You may read and hear a lot, but you people will never know. About Guin’s statement that he had about our wounded is exactly true. I am sure glad that he had the privilege to write it. And it will give the people some idea of how our wounded are cared for. Really marvelous. I am like Charles Joseph, if the people at home only knew how hard our boys are fighting at the front, they would sweat an extra drop more. For those pictures you people see are after a place is taken in a matter of hours or days. The front lines are hell, I know for I have been there. And about the paper. You should have done that a long time ago, for I see no reason why one man should carry such a load. It is not asking too much from our little city or town in sending the paper to each and everyone of us for the paper means as much to me as a letter from our mother or father. You see we can’t write when we want to, only as time permits us. So everyone at home do your best in writing or sending clippings of papers to a soldier. He will more than appreciate it. I will have to end this as I could go on forever, but it will keep until we get home. Thanks a million for the paper and tell everyone hello for me.

- Mr. and Mrs. J.G. WATSON of Arizona and formerly of Alma have bought the lots on the Kinmundy-Louisville road known as the GRAHAM or SONGER home. A few years ago the brick house burned while Dr. FOWLER and sons lived there. Mr. and Mrs. WATSON are now building a house on these lots. We are glad to have this couple make Kinmundy their future home.

- Fred KLEISS is a patient in the Salem Hospital since Sunday. He has been ill at his home for 2 weeks in his home. He is suffering from malaria fever.

- Miss Florence JACK has returned from Carbondale where she has spent the summer as a student at the S.I.N.U.

- Mrs. Howard DISS and daughter, Loretta, have returned home form a visit in Baraboo, Wis. from a visit with her sister, Mrs. Arthur GILBERT, and brother, PFC James GREEN and family.

- Mr. and Mrs. Cecil BAILEY celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary on Aug. 16. They are the parents of 11 children, all living. One son, Lloyd, is now in the armed forces in France. The oldest daughter is the wife of Wayne ROBB, living in Salem, another daughter, Jaunita, is employed in Kankakee, and another daughter, Frances, is employed in our Post Office. The rest of the family are attending our grade and high school. Several friends called during the evening and enjoyed ice cream. Mr. and Mrs. BAILEY moved to Kinmundy 5 years ago and bought the Ed DOOLEN farm just west of Route 37.

- The descendants of John BROWN and his wife, Nancy HOLLITT, met in Bryan Park Aug. 20th to hold their annual reunion. This was the 16th reunion of the BROWN family. In 1927 a number of relatives met at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Eura BROWN for purpose of celebrating the birthdays of Mr. and Mrs. BROWN and at this time it was voted to make it an annual affair. A basket dinner was held at the noon hour followed by the business meeting. Mrs. Tillie O’CONNELL of Effingham was re-elected President, Mrs. Anna SMITH of Farina, Vice President; and Mrs. Leslie DeWERFF of Farina, Sec’y and Treas. There were 47 members present. Boys serving their country are: Ralph and Lowell BAGOTT, Edgar Neale STEPHENS, Gene and Earl PATHEL and Howard RINKLE.

- Cpl. and Mrs. Richard BRANSON have a daughter born Aug. 24 in Salem Hospital named Penlopia Sue. The mother was formerly Miss Ruth MEYER, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Emil MEYER.

- As we go to press, we learn of the death of James LEWIS, a farmer residing southeast of Kinmundy. He died in Salem Hospital after a short illness.

- Capt. Robert B. KNEEMEYER, husband of the former Katherine WILKINSON, has been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross as well as an air medal of four Oak Leaf Clusters. He is the pilot of a B-17 Flying Fortress called by him ‘Amen’. His wife is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herschel WILKINSON of West Frankfort, Ill.

- Mrs. WININGER, wife of the former pastor, Rev. E. Gray WININGER of Claremont, died in Olney Hospital on Wednesday from pneumonia. Rev. WININGER as the pastor of our local Methodist Church from 1925-29.

- Deputy Sheriff and Mrs. Fred HANKS, now living in Salem, but formerly of Omega twp., received a message from the War Dept. last Thursday stating their eldest son, Sgt. Dean HANKS, has been missing in action in France since Aug. 8th. Inasmuch as the message read "missing", the family has hopes that he will turn up O.K in the near future. There has been cases like this and the boys would turn up later. So they still have hopes. Sgt. Dean HANKS entered the service March 25, 1942, was shipped overseas in Dec. 1943, landing in England where he was stationed until the invasion of France. He is 35 years of age. The last letter received by the family from him, was dated July 26th. Mr. and Mrs. HANKS have another son in the service also, Sgt. Donald HANKS, now stationed in Italy. They also have another son at home, Doyle. Also 3 daughters, Mrs. Eileen DYE of Fairfield, Mrs. Louise BRADY of Charleston, S.C., and Miss Fleta, who is at present in Charleston, S.C. with her sister. One son-in-law is also in the service, Lt. (jg) Theodore BRADY, now stationed in Charleston, S.C. Mr. and Mrs. HANKS have many old neighbors and friends in this community who extend to them their deepest sympathy and they are uttering prayers that the missing lad may be safe somewhere and will show up later on.

- Omega: Louis EVELAND, a veteran of W.W.I. died at Marion Hospital Monday. Services will be held at Mt. Carmel Baptist Church.

- Omega: Omega School started Monday with Miss Audrey FIELDS as teacher.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. George COLE and Mrs. Virgil LIVESAY were in Kinmundy Sunday attending the HOLT Reunion.

- Swift School: Mrs. Erma HEADLEY and children of Lansing, Mich. have been visiting the past week with her sister, Mrs. Kenneth ROBB and family.

- Swift School: School started at North Fork Monday with Mrs. Marjorie GREEN as teacher. School will begin at Swift the 5th.

- Swift School: Lieut. Darrell ROBB of Ft. Benning called on his relatives Monday, Mr. and Mrs. Mack ROBB and Mr. and Mrs. R.H. GREEN.

- Swift School: Clyde BASSETT and family spent Sunday at the Bert GARRETT home in Kinmundy.

- Swift School: Pvt. Harold CHANCE came last Thursday to spend a 10 day furlough with his parents, Seymore CHANCE and other relatives.

- Swift School: Virgil LIVESAY and wife spent Sunday evening at the Billie MORRIS home.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT and daughter, Donna Mae, were in Patoka Sunday afternoon attending the wedding of Mrs. GARRETT’s nephew, Darwin JONES, son of Roy JONES and wife.

- Pleasant Grove: School started at Elder Monday with Mrs. Helen MILLICAN, teacher.

- Prairie Grove: School began here Monday with Glenn WELLS as teacher.

- Prairie Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Elno HOHLT and family and Fenton HOHLT attended Memorial Services in Farina Sunday for Cpl. Garland NORMAN, who was killed in France on July 13.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. Edwin HARRELL and Mr. and Mrs. Fred HARRIS of St. Elmo spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. F.S. HARRIS. The ladies called on Mrs. Mary MAYER who is staying in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis BURKETT.

- Meacham: Rockhold School began their term of school Monday with Mrs. Walter WEISS as teacher.

- Wilson School: Cpl. Harold W. KLEISS of Virginia came last week for a 10 day furlough.

- Wilson School: Pvt. George MEYER returned to his camp in Oklahoma after a 14 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chris MEYER and family.

- Robert P. OSTERHOLTZ, MMM 3c is here on leave with his family. Mrs. OSTERHOLTZ is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A.S. PARRISH.

- Mrs. Lewis JONES and sister, Miss Martha WALKER, returned Monday from a short trip to South Carolina to visit the former’s son, Pvt. Harold JONES.

Sept. 7, 1944:

- Here’s a nice letter from Tec. 5, Chas. DeWEESE, who is at present in the Aleutian Islands. He says: It’s been quite a long while since I last wrote you, so will attempt to write a line or two. It may not be much as news is pretty scarce out this way, but I will let you know that I receive my paper regular and want to thank those responsible for it. It is appreciated very much by all the boys. I suppose it is needless to try to tell you about this part of the country. Most everyone knows all about it and the weather. I think some of the boys from there have experienced it. I have been out here for 27 months and I think there is more coming, just how much I don’t know. I am hoping to get out of here pretty soon, for I think I’ve been out of circulation long enough. (It’s really out too). I am ready any time for a boat ride. (Ha). I read all the boys letters. It is good to see where they are at and what’s going on with them. There have been a few who have been so fortunate having a pretty tough time. They are doing a first class job of cleaning out over there and if it keeps up they may all be home before too long. Anyway, I wish them all the best. I hear it has been pretty dry back there. You should of had some of the rain we have had. There has been a lot of it. I’ve seen all kinds of weather in one day, leaving out only the warm I guess. I haven’t had any summer since the year I entered the service. That was in ‘41. I guess they still have it back there, don’t they? But so far, I have fared pretty well. I’ll have to say so-long now. Here’s regards to everyone back there and I hope to be seeing you soon. Thanks again for the paper.

- Here’s one from Sgt. Elliott THOMS, who is in New Guinea and he has this to say: Well I appreciate all the papers you are sending me, so think it is high time I wrote you about it. I left San Francisco 2 years ago for Australia on a P24 (Liberator) and after 4 days arrived in Brisbane, Australia. We were about 38 hours in the air and believe me, that was some trip. After 3 days rest we flew to New Guinea to do some engineering work on P38's. About 2 months of that or I might say 2 months of slit trench time as that was where we went most of the time. We then returned to Australia via B17 and was in Australia training P38 pilots for over a year. My job was electrician on all aircraft, so I had plenty to do. We are now back in New Guinea training pilots and acting as a service squad too. I have all the bananas and cocoanuts I can eat and have been to several native villages. They are pretty if you can stand that sort of thing. Just between you and me, I would rather look at a good old hog pen, would be a pleasant smell. I had better close before I tell how bad I want to come home. Maybe I will get there if they can get the rotation plane off the merry-go-round. Thanks again for the paper and to all my old friends in old Kinmundy. Well thumbs up boys, "Roger".

- Here’s one from Joe SLOVICK, MM 2c, who is going to school in California. He says: Have been receiving the Kinmundy Express regularly lately for which I want to thank you. I guess I owe you an apology for not writing sooner but somehow I have just not got around to it sooner. Have been very busy since I’ve been here, but also, neglected my letter writing. At present I am stationed at the Naval Landing Force Equipment Depot in Albany, Cal. This place is conveniently located, so we can go to any of the cities in the San Francisco Bay area. Like my present duty here much better than my previous naval experiences. Have been attending evening classes at the University of California in Berkley. Have been doing architectural and marine drafting. So with my regular working hours and school at night, I’ve been quite busy. Sorry, I don’t have much to write but have enjoyed reading the letters you published from the boys, especially, from overseas. Having spent sometime across myself, I can understand how most of them feel and realize how much it means to be back. I hope that it is all over soon so we can all come back home in the near future. Haven’t any idea how long I’ll be here but if you didn’t mind to give my address to any of the home folks who cared to write, I would be glad to hear from them. The weather is very nice here now. In fact the temperature changes very little here throughout the year. Thanks again for the paper and would like to hear any time you care to write.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Chas. W. JOHNSON, who is at present in the Hawaiian Islands. He says: Everything here is the same as usual. We’re not doing much and it sure is dull, not much to do and no excitement. We sure are tired of this racket, all I can think of is getting home to my wife again. We have been playing lots of baseball. It is sort of an honor to play with such players as JADMNICK, LADIJONNIE, MIZE, McMANNICK, GORDON, REESE, DICKEY, and others, not to mention Red RUFFING and many minor league players and to know them personally. I have eaten so many cocanuts, pineapples, sugar cane and dates and swan in salt water I believe I am turning to gook myself. I don’t know much more to write, only just how I am hoping this war gets over soon. I get the paper every week and it sure helps a lot. Thanks.

- Here’s one from Cpl. Earl BRIMBERRY, who is in the Southwest Pacific Theater and from the tone of his letter, is seeing plenty of action. He says: We have been in combat for about 2 months now and haven’t had much time to do much of anything. This was our first time to meet the Japs and it was very exciting at times and not very funny at others. I am a radio operator and the only way we could get communications to our forward observers was by putting a radio in the top of a tree which was about 150 feet high and man it 24 hours. At night when the wind blew, it swayed as if it was on a pair of sky hooks. We could see far out into the jungle and at night the tracers would fly like big lightning bugs. In the front lines it is not quite so pleasant. The main thing is that the nights are too dark and too long. Of course, the Japs like to do their damage at those times too, when you can’t see an inch in front of you eyes. Well, if you have ever seen a million black cats on a dark night you will have some idea as to what I mean, and you get scared too, but everyone is scared so nobody is ashamed of it, but scared or not, we have killed plenty of Japs and now they have quit and are headed into the hills either to starve or hook in with the natives. The natives are funny here. They will work for us awhile then go across and work for the Japs, but they are valuable to lead patrols, carry ammo and wounded out of the jungle. They have saved a lot of fellows lives. I had the good fortune of spending a few hours with John McCULLEY and Harold JONES before I came up here and just missed Floyd EAGAN by the skin of my teeth. We chewed the fat for quite a spell. I haven’t received the paper for a long time now, but I guess I’ll get a whole sack full some of these days when things like that get a chance to come up. I was very sorry to hear of Junior HINKLEY’s death I just missed seeing him by a few days before they left. Matter of fact, we were supposed to go on the same task force, but was taken off at the last minute for reasons I can’t discuss. I hope everyone at home are swell. I can assure you that I am in the pink a far as health is concerned and I hope to be home by next Christmas. These Japs are not human though, and our most severe battles are yet to come. It is going to be very costly, but we can do it. I saw Bob HOPE, Frances LANGFORD, Jerry CALONA, and a couple more yesterday after sitting in the sun for 6 hours. Their plane was late. So long.

- Here’s one from Emmerson JONES, F2 c, who is sailing the seven seas aboard the U.S.S. Pennsylvania. He says: While I have a little time to myself, I thought it was about time I wrote and thanked you and the other folks for the paper. I have just begun receiving them and I sure enjoy reading the letters which the rest of the boys from home write, especially, the one which Charles JASPER had written from China, as Charles and I used to run around together quite a bit and that was the first I had heard from him since he left for the service. I have a very fine buddy with me by the name of Michael BERRA and every time I receive a paper we sit and read every thing that is in it. He is from St. Louis and he enjoys very much reading about the Municipal Opera. I would like to tell you about where I have been and what we have done since I left the good old States, but they are pretty strict on what we write. So that will just have to wait until I can get home and tell you in person. Well, Mr. VALLOW, there isn’t anything else I can think of to write this time so I will close thanking you once again for the paper

- Mrs. Mary DONAHUE died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Mazie MARTIN, in Chicago, sometime Friday night. Mrs. MARTIN found her dead in bed upon arising Saturday morning. Funeral services were held Tuesday with interment made in Chicago. Mrs. DONAHUE left Kinmundy on Wednesday of last week after a brief visit here with her 2 sisters, Mrs. Anna LYONS and Mrs. Margaret O’BRIEN and families. She appeared to have her good health so her passing was a great shock. Besides these 2 sisters, she leaves a brother, Will ROONEY of Chicago; 1 son, Daniel of Chicago; and 6 daughters, Mazie MARTIN, Irene FRANCISCO, June JERAN, Gertrude WILLINGHAM of Chicago; Catherine COUGHLIN, the wife of Col. J.V. COUGHLIN of Camp Hood, Texas; and Frances ELLE of Cary, Ill. Her husband, Daniel DONAHUE, and 2 daughters, Nelle and Nora, preceded her in death. She has been spending her winters in Florida and visited among her children. She always managed to make an annual pilgrimage to the place of her birth, Kinmundy.

- Junior VANSCYOC, S2 c, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lester VANSCYOC, has been operated on for appendicitis. He is in serving the Navy in the Pacific.

- Funeral services for James LEWIS were held Sunday afternoon in the Camp Ground school house near the LEWIS home. Burial in the Evergreen Cemetery.

- Word has been received of the arrival of a son on Aug. 29 to S. Sgt. and Mrs. Victor MERCER of Gainville, Texas. The mother was formerly was Miss Marie KOLB.

- Mrs. Lucille INGRAM JOHNSON and 3 children Jimmie, Nancy and Joyce, moved last Friday to their home in Windsor.

- Mrs. Thelma WHITNEY, age 33, wife of Roy WHITNEY, died in the family home near Brown Church Tuesday. She is survived by her husband and 5 children. Services will be held Thursday from Brown Church with interment in Parker Cemetery.

- The Lewis BURKETT family celebrated the birthday anniversaries of Lewis BURKETT and his son, Gene BURKETT, also the home coming of another son, Forrest BURKETT, U.S. Army, Sept. 3rd with a family dinner. A list of those attending was included.

- Miss Helen WILBORN, a life long resident of this city, died Wednesday in the home of her brother, Luther WILBORN, in Lebanon, Mo. Services will be held from the Linton Funeral Home with burial in Evergreen Cemetery.

- Mrs. Gladys JONES and Helen ROHRBOUGH of Salem, and Misses Florence JACK and Katherine WORMLEY of this city were dinner guests in the C.B. ROHRBOUGH home, Tuesday, celebrating Miss Ruth ROHRBOUGH’s birthday.

- Bertha Lee HAMILTON COPPLE, daughter of G.W. and Mary Ellen HAMILTON, was born Dec. 2, 1884, at Garrison, Ky. She came to Illinois in 1900. She married Wm. PERRY on May 10, 1904, who died June 10, 1935. In March 1939, she married Wm. COPPLE of Farina, who died June 10, 1935. In March 1939 she married Wm. COPPLE of Farina who survives her. She was a member of the Christian Church. She is survived by 3 children, Harold of Butler; Guy of Kinmundy; and Goldie, wife of S.E. STOKELY of Salem; 2 step-sons, Charles of Kinmundy; and Noah PERRY of Davenport, Iowa; 16 grandchildren; 3 sisters, Mrs. Dave ISHMAE and Mrs. Harry COLLIER, of Worthington, Ky., and Mrs. C.A. BOONE of Kinmundy; and 2 brothers, Alex HAMILTON of Iuka; and Sheridan HAMILTON of Mich. Services were held from the Christian Church in Kinmundy with interment in Evergreen Cemetery.

- Mr. and Mrs. Truman SPURLIN of Vandalia, former residents of our city, have received word from the government that their youngest son, Lewis, a marine, serving in the Southwest Pacific was wounded by shrapnel on July 21st. Mr. and Mrs. SPURLIN have 3 sons in the service and we hope they will soon receive good news from Lewis.

- Mrs. Gail MILLER has sold her store to Mr. W.R. DOOLEN, who took charge Monday. Mrs. MILLER bought this store about 3 years ago and has made Kinmundy a good merchant. It is her intentions now to go to Kankakee where she will be with her daughter, Miss Shirley. Mr. DOOLEN is no newcomer in the business world. For several years, he operated a barber shop here. After disposing of it, he was employed by the Kinmundy Lumber Co., where he remained until a few weeks ago.

- The local high school opened Sept. 1st with an enrollment of 165. Late registration ill no doubt raise the number to some extent. The faculty has been completed by the employment of Keith McCARTY, of Salem, a band orchestra leader.

- Pvt. Leon JONES is here for 5 days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar JONES and family and grandmother, Mrs. Edna WILLIAMS.

- John BORING, Bkr. 1 c arrived Monday after seeing service in the South Pacific for several months.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. Edwin HARRELL have been having some carpenter work done to their home in the last few weeks.

- Miss Lois Marie KLINE spent part of her vacation in Mississippi, the guest of PFC R. Bruce OLDEN.

- Mrs. Icy GARRETT spent the weekend in Mt. Vernon, with her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Dow GREEN.

- Mrs. J.H. DISS and daughter, Loretta, returned from Baraboo, Wis., where they visited with Mrs. Arthur GILBERT and children, PFC, and Mrs. James GREEN and daughter.

- Wilson School: Mr. and Mrs. Chris MEYER and daughters were in St. Peter last week attending the funeral of an aunt, Mrs. Lizzie GERHART.

- Wilson School: School opened on Aug. 28th with Miss Elsie TOCKSTEIN as teacher.

- Wilson School: Cpl. Harold W. KLEISS left Monday for his camp in Virginia after spending his furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred KLEISS and daughters, Mildred and Helen.

- Wilson School: Chris MEYER and family called Sunday at the Emil MEYER home to see the new granddaughter, at which Grandpa Emil is mighty proud and he and grandma wear a smile from ear to ear.

- Mrs. F.G. ALEXANDER, Mrs. Margaret O’BRIEN, Mrs. Josephine SNOW and Miss Cornelia O’BRIEN attended the funeral of Mrs. Mary DONAHUE held in Chicago, Tuesday.

- Meadow Branch: Meadow Branch School commenced Monday with Will GREEN, teacher.

- Omega: Robert FENTON of the U.S. Navy is spending his leave with his mother, Mrs. Julia HANKINS.

- Omega: Mr. and Mrs. SMITH of Missouri and Zarold LEWIS, who is stationed in New Mexico, were called home last week by the death of their father, J.H. LEWIS.

- Hattie COCKRELL spent the weekend with her brother, Harry NICHOLS. On Sunday they all attended a HOLZHAUSEN Reunion at Flora Park.

- Sherman: Mrs. Fannia MILLER is visiting in Vernon with her daughter, Mrs. Marie HATHAWAY, and son, James, who is home on furlough. He has been stationed in Trinidad.

- Sherman: Our school opened Aug. 28 with Mr. HUMBIE as teacher.

- Pleasant Grove: Several from here attended the funeral of Lewis EVELAND on Wednesday and the funeral of James LEWIS on Sunday, which was conducted by Rev. Erwin HAYS.

- Pleasant Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Clyde HEISTAND, Mr. and Mrs. Claude HIESTAND and Sammie, Mr. and Mrs. Pearl ROSE and son, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. KELL, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph ROSE and daughter, and Mr. and Mrs. Herschel ROSE and daughters celebrated their 11th wedding anniversary and Sammie HIESTAND’s 17th birthday. Afternoon visitors were: Mr. and Mrs. Roy STEVENSON, and daughter, Wanda, and daughter-in-law, Mrs. Jane STEVENSON, and 2 children, and Mr. and Mrs. Claude ROSE and family.

- Pleasant Grove: Mrs. Amy SIPES has received word from her son, Woodson, who has arrived safely in England.

- Green Ridge: School started at Green Ridge last Monday with Mrs. Rada CALDWELL as teacher. There are 10 pupils, with 4 in the first year.

- Swift School: Mack ROBB and wife, Kenneth ROBB and family, George COLE and family, Clyde BASSETT and family, and Virgil LIVESAY and family were in Salem last week attending the fair.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth ROBB and daughter, Judith Ann, spent Sunday at the Billy MORRIS home.

- Mrs. John D. DYER and children moved here from their home in LaClede Saturday. They will leave with their mother, Mrs. Eliza BARBEE. Mr. DYER is employed in Jackson, Mich. and spent Labor Day weekend here with family.

Sept. 14, 1944:

- We asked our son, Tec. 5 Joseph G. VALLOW, who is stationed in the Percy Jones General Hospital, Battle Creek, Mich., to write us something for publication. He comes through this week with a regular story entitled "I Saw the First Boy to Return from France". Here it is: I was awakened from a sound sleep at 4 a.m. one morning by the newsboys calling out the news of the invasion of France. I was up immediately and dressed, and soon on my way to the hospital to start the day, knowing that the war really started in France and that Hitler and his mob would be to their knees before too long. But I also knew that many an American boy would be wounded on this day and some would be giving their last full measure of devotion that their country might live. In the latter part of the morning, the Captain called all the public relations staff into his office and told us that we would be getting some of those boys who made the invasion in about a month and to be on the lookout for them. It was on Saturday evening, July 1st, about 5 o’clock, when our office received the word that an ambulance plane was coming in. As usual, I went to the air field to meet and talk with the boys who came in. This seemed like any other ambulance plane bringing in wounded veterans. But somehow, I had a strange feeling about this certain plane that I couldn’t explain. It was still light as I watched the large C-47 ambulance plane from the front seat of one of the waiting ambulances, come in for an easy and perfect landing. We sat there watching this large ship roll slowly up to the line. Then we went out to meet it. The first 3 boys out were walking patients and got into the ambulance I was in. The plane had 1 litter patient and he was placed in the second ambulance. All the way to the hospital, I kept wondering who that boy was on the litter in the other ambulance. After the boys were unloaded and in the receiving office of he hospital, I went up to this boy and asked him his name and address to release to the newspapers. He looked up at me with a forced smile on his fact and said, "Private James C. LESTER, Chio, Michigan." Then I asked him where he was injured. He replied again with that same smile on his face, "On the beach of France." He had no sooner said this when he asked me if I knew where his old outfit now was in France. My next thought was to rush to the office to get my camera and get a shot of this lad. This I did. As I went through the office, I told the staff the first man to return from the invasion of France was here. I got me picture to release to the newspapers O.K. It was 3 days later when I saw LESTER again. During this time, the newspaper reporters were eagerly awaiting to get his story of the invasion. Due to the nature of LESTER’s injuries, it was very hard for him to speak, thus causing a delay before he could be interviewed. However, after the 3 days, he was able to be interviewed by the newspaper men. I will say that he had a wonderful story to tell and everyone who heard it, well, it just made them feel more proud of our boys in France. Private LESTER is a typical American farm lad whom you might find around Kinmundy. He much preferred to talk about his pet Beatle Hound, "Buster", and of his team of horses, a picture of which he carried in his wallet. And more than once throughout the interview, he would say, "Farming is the real life." He then started to tell his story of the part he played in the invasion of France. Lester reported that he and his outfit, the combat engineers were exactingly trained for their job in the invasion. For 4 days and nights, they were on a boat. And in this length of time, they made several feints at the French coast. But each time they would turn back and go on a confusing course in the channel. Then early on the morning of June 6th, they well knew this was it. The big show was soon to start. They climbed down the sides of a large boat into smaller landing crafts and started toward the coast. During this time, our navy was opening up with everything it had. The air force was in on it too. It was truly a great show. LESTER’s craft was one of the first crafts to go in. His boat touched bottom, the ramp dropped, LESTER grabbed 2 belts of ammunition, then jumped into the water which was 3 feet deep. "I struggled for 50 yards towards the shore. It was then that I got it." I don’t know what hit me, it was either a bullet or a shrapnel. I fell and turned over, supporting myself with my left arm and holding my head above the water, I called for a medic to come over. The medic gave me a shot and from then on I don’t remember much." LESTER was hit in the chest, the object going thru and injuring his spine. Later, back in England in the hospital, LESTER underwent an operation and on June 23rd, was flown back to the States. Two days later, I saw and talked with LESTER again. By now his parents had seen him a few times. He then told me that his old "Buster" was well. Looking up again from his pillow, he said, "He’s a swell old dog, not much on hunting because he’s gun-shy. But couldn’t ask for a better friend. I’ll sure be glad when I can get out and see him again. Maybe he’ll even do better when we go out hunting again, and I shoot a rabbit or pheasant." I, too, think old Buster will be glad to see LESTER up and around on the farm. But old Buster may have to wait a little while to hunt again with his master for Private LESTER now lies in the Percy Jones General Hospital paralyzed from the chest down from that wound he received in the invasion of France. Today, Private LESTER is showing good improvement in the hospital. And with the wonderful medical care the United States Army is giving it’s wounded veterans, I say it would be a safe bet that about this time next year, Private LESTER will be hunting rabbits and pheasants with old buster on his farm near Clio, Michigan.

- First Lieutenant Richard R. ATKINS of this city has been awarded the Bronze Star for heroic achievement in action on the Fifty Army front in Italy. Presentation of the award was made by Major General William G. LIVESAY, commander of the 91st Infantry Division at a ceremony held near the front lines. While directing fire from an artillery battery during the drive to the Arno River, an enemy shell landed 10 yards from ATKINS and set ammunition afire. Ignoring the enemy shelling and the exploding ammunition behind him, ATKINS cooly continued to direct fire at the enemy. He also directed the extinguishing of the burning ammunition and administering of first aid to his men. The 35 year old officer entered the army June 23, 1942 and was commissioned at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, Jan. 14, 1943.

- James T. BROWN, son of Wm. and Nellie BROWN, was born March 6, 1871, in Steeleville, Ill. At an early age he was left an orphan. When 10 years old he came to Kinmundy to make his home with an aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Jasper STEELE. At the death of these relatives, he made his home with and was employed by the late D.P. (Judge) SNELLING. As a very young man, he was one of the first to enlist in the United States Army and served in the Spanish-American war. He was in Cuba thru 1898. On Dec. 27, 1903, he married Mamie SONGER, and they had 2 children, both dying in infancy. Mrs. BROWN died Aug. 6, 1927, and since that time he has lived alone in the old SONGER homestead. He is the last member of his family being survived by nieces, nephews, and cousins. Services were held from the Linton Funeral Home with interment in the SONGER family lot in Evergreen Cemetery.

- Mrs. Martha HUGGINS was the high bidder for the property of the late Helen WILBORN. Mrs. HUGGINS will again make Kinmundy her home in the future, as well as her daughter, Clara Belle, who is now teaching in Cerro Gordo. The 2 HUGGINS boys, Harold and Francis, are married and are in the service.

- Not Operating: Because someone destroyed my sorghum mill on the night on Sept. 12, I will not be able to operate my mill. Rubin CRAIN.

- Fred KLEISS was taken Saturday afternoon back to the Salem Memorial Hospital. Mr. KLEISS just returned home a week before from the hospital and was recovering nicely from malaria fever, but an abscess formed on the left lung and he returned to the hospital for medical care.

- Helen WILBORN was born in Kinmundy, and died at Lebanon, Missouri on Sept. 6, 1944 at the age of 85 years and 27 days. She leaves a brother, Martin L. WILBORN of Lebanon, Mo. Two sisters and a brother have preceded her in death. She never married. Kinmundy was always her home where during long and quiet life, she made many friends. Services were held from the Linton Funeral Home with interment in Evergreen Cemetery.

- Mary Ann BOSLEY, nee DIXON, was born Nov. 5, 1877 at Shotton, Durham Co., England, and died Sept. 8, 1944. She married Edward Hall BOSLEY at Belleville, Ill. on June 21, 1899, at the Methodist Parsonage. Mr. BOSLEY preceded his wife in death 6 years. She is survived by 1 son, Frank BOSLEY of Urbana, and 1 granddaughter, 1 sister, Mrs. Wm. NIEMAN, and 1 brother, Adlai S. DIXON of East St. Louis. She united with the Methodist Church at Belleville, Ill. at the age of 16. Services were held from the Linton Funeral Home with interment in Evergreen Cemetery.

- Here’s a nice letter from Cpl. Adolph TOCKSTEIN, who is stopping in France on his way to Berlin. He says: As most of the boys have been writing to you, I felt like I was neglecting my duty, so I will try and write a few lines. First of all, I want to thank you for the paper which I enjoy reading very much. For a boy a long ways from home, there is nothing he craves better than news from home. A former Kinmundy boy, Capt. MARLOW, is our troop commander. He is a swell fellow and is doing a great job. I am proud of him and glad to be under his command as he comes from one of my old home towns. I’m in France, our pleasures are few and far between, so we just have to make the best of it. The people here are friendly as they watch you roll along. They come and greet you with cheers, joy and happiness, to show you their appreciation. As I watch their happy smiling faces, some with tears streaming from their eyes with joy. It does something deep down inside a fellow and makes you feel good. You realize for the first time that the job we are doing has not all been in vain. May only hope is to put an end to all wars and have lasting peace. So that no boys will ever have to go through this again. In closing I want to say to all my friends in the service from back home, wherever you are or wherever you may go, the best of luck always and may God speed you safely home. To all the folks and friends back home, I want to say, hello and hope to see everybody again in the near future.

- Here’s a short one from PFC Dale WRIGHT. Although, he doesn’t say so, but he is also in France doing his bit. He says: For 2 years I have received your paper and enjoyed the humor and inspiration of those at home and those who are protruding this global war for liberty and dignity of all. In that respect, with inexpressive appreciation, I want to thank and congratulate you for the honorable, moral and social task which you have strenuously achieved. In behalf of those trying efforts of yours, I again want to say thank you.

- Meadow Branch: Pvt. Andrew YATES in home on furlough and called Monday to see his uncle, Elmer BUTTS.

- Meadow Branch: Mrs. Effis JOHNSON is staying in the home of her son, Loren, and wife in Salem, caring for the new baby daughter.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. F.S. HARRIS went to Yale, Ill. Sunday to attend funeral services held there for Mr. HARRIS’ brother.

- Meacham: The Community Birthday Circle held their first regular meeting this club year with Mrs. Edwin HARRELL on Thursday. The hostess had a comfort to quilt for our day’s work and by leaving time it was all quilted. A fine dinner was served by the hostess assisted by Mrs. HASSEBROCK. Mrs. Hugh LACEY was a welcome guest. Next meeting to be with Mrs. Susanna JONES.

- Meacham: Mr. and Mrs. Edwin HARRELL were Sunday guests of her nephew and family, Mr. and Mrs. Glen JAHRAUS and got acquainted with the new baby in their home.

- Capt. and Mrs. Wayne JONES and son left Sunday for Rantoul.

- Meacham: Pvt. Forrest BURKETT of Scott Field was home 1 day visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis BURKETT.

- Meacham: The teacher, Mrs. Raymond SOLDNER and her pupils of Young School District, held a picnic at Bryan Park Sunday.

- Lt. and Mrs. Ralph DAY are visiting their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Dwight DAY, Sr. near Alma.

- Miss Helen PRUETT, who is teaching in Rossville, Ill. spent the weekend here with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.S. PRUETT, Lt. and Mrs. Carl E. PRUETT of Norfolk, Va., and Mrs. Martha HUGGINS were also guests in the PRUETT home.

- Swift School: Kenneth ROBB and family, and R.H. GREEN and family spent Sunday with Mack ROBB and wife. Afternoon callers were Guy ARNOLD and wife, and Marvin CONANT and wife.

- Swift School: Paul SWIFT and family were in Kinmundy Sunday attending a dinner for Jr. BORING, who is home from overseas duty at the John BORING home.

- Swift School: Mrs. Fred GAMMON spent Sunday with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Virgil LIVESAY.

- Swift School: Kenneth ROBB, who has finished threshing in this community, bought 20 gallons of ice cream and invited them all to meet at Swift School house Monday evening. A large crowd came and there was plenty of ice cream, cake, and cookies for everyone.

- Swift School: PFC Cecil JONES of Indiana spent Sunday here with Frank JONES and wife.

- Private Earl SCHWABE of La. is enjoying his furlough here with his family in the Ray GEORGE home.

- Sgt. Cloris STIPP of Texas spent Friday here with his aunt, Mrs. Martha DOWNS.

- Young School: Mr. and Mrs. Lyman JONES and Mr. and Mrs. Clyde MULVANEY and family attended the funeral of Mrs. Thelma WHITNEY at Brown Church Thursday afternoon.

- Young School: Mr. and Mrs. Earl LANE, Mr. and Mrs. Ellis WILKINSON, and Mr. and Mrs. Virgil SEE and son attended the funeral of Mrs. Maggie COPPLE.

- Prairie Grove: PFC and Mrs. Hugh LACEY spent Friday night in the home of her brother, Mr. and Mrs. Art WEISS and daughter, Virginia.

- Wilson School: Pvt. Claude DENHAM of Miss. and family of Salem at supper Tuesday with his sister, Mrs. Eura SHAFFER and family.

Sept. 21, 1944:

- Cpl. Xon SCHOOLEY, son of Mr. and Mrs. James SCHOOLEY, Reported Killed in Action in France: Another telegram was received in this community Sunday from the War Dept. which of course bore some very sad news. This was addressed to Mr. and Mrs. James SCHOOLEY and stated that their son, Xon, had been killed in action in France, on Aug. 8th. This was certainly a hard blow to this good family and another severe shock to the community. Mrs. SCHOOLEY, in company with another son, Maurice and family, of Vandalia, happened to be visiting relatives in Salem at the time the message was delivered. When they returned home, the father had to deliver the sad news. But they were thankful Maurice was with them on this occasion. Xon was the baby of the family of 7 children. Naturally, a lot of love and affection was bestowed upon him by his family. And he had aunts and uncles who loved him almost as much as his parents. They, too, are grief stricken. Xon was born Oct. 3, 1918 in the present SCHOOLEY homestead 1 mile south of Kinmundy. He attended school in Kinmundy and graduated from Kinmundy H.S. with the class of ‘36. Since graduation, he worked at various jobs, helping his father on the farm, working some in the oil fields near Salem, and in a lumber mill in Pennsylvania. It was while he was working in Pennsylvania that he registered for the Selective Service. He afterwards came home and had his registration transferred to the local board. He did not wait his turn for the Selective Service but volunteered and was mustered into the army June 18, 1941. After graduating from a communications school at Ft. Knox, Ky., he was commissioned as a Corporal, which rank he held until his death. He was assigned to the 3rd Armored Division and sailed overseas about a year ago. He entered France on June 17th and was a radio operator in a tank. Besides his parents, he leaves 5 brothers, namely, PFC David SCHOOLEY of Dale Mabry Field, Fla.; Maurice of Vandalia; Glenn of Chicago; Clyde of Burbank, Calif.; and Clark at home; and 1 sister, Mrs. Helen GAINES of Mattoon. A brother-in-law, Floyd GAINES, is also serving with the armed forces. Due to the failing health of both Mr. and Mrs. SCHOOLEY, it is their desire that no memorial service be held. But we are sure they would appreciate a card or letter or even a visit from their many friends. Truly, Xon was a good soldier and we know that he made things pleasant for everyone around him just like he did when he was here. We will miss that cheery smile he had for everyone. (A picture was included with this article.)

- Lt. and Mrs. Ralph DAY returned to Mississippi last week after spending a leave in Alma with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Dwight DAY. Lt. DAY was a student officer in the 28th class to graduate from the advanced twin engine Columbus Army Flying School near Columbus, Miss. on Sept. 8th. He received the coveted silver wings of a flying officer and was transferred in rank at the graduation to the Army Air Forces. Lt. DAY entered flying training and was a student officer, while attending flying schools at Clarksdale and Greenville, Miss., before reporting to the air base at Columbus for his final stage of flight training.

- Word has been received by Mr. and Mrs. Milton LACEY of Meacham twp that their son, Kenneth, was advanced in rank from 2nd Lieutenant to 1st Lieutenant on Sept. 1st and in addition, was awarded the Air Medal for Meritorous Action. Lt. LACEY is seeing action in France.

- John, son of Thomas and Kathryn KIRK MERCHANT, was born Aug. 26, 1860, in Gibson City, Ind., and died at his home in Kinmundy on Sept. 15, 1944. On Nov. 19 at Union, Ind., he married Emma ROBBING, and they had 8 children, 6 having preceded him in death. His wife, Emma, died Feb. 3, 1939. On Jan. 26, 1943 he married Charlotte DRAIN of Ind. Mr. MERCHANT came to Kinmundy in 1913 to make his home. He was a member of the Methodist Church, and also a member of the Knights of Pythian and D.O.K.K. He leaves: his wife, Charlotte; 2 daughters, Mrs. Chester MENDENHALL of Kinmundy; and Mrs. Ervin DAVIS of Glezen, Ind.; 13 grandchildren; 4 half brothers, Cyrus DEFFENDOLL, Oakland City, Ind; Tom DEFFENDOLL of East St. Louis; Everett DEFFENDOLL of Mt. Carmel, Ill.; Elden DEFFENDOLL of Miami, Fla; 2 sisters, Mrs. Mary MADDEN of Princeton, Ind.; Mrs. Ruth HORNBROOK of Union, Ind.; and 4 stepsons; and 2 stepdaughters. Services were held from the Methodist Church with interment in Evergreen Cemetery.

- Funeral services for W.H. LINTON, 82, were held Saturday in the Bear Creek Baptist Church, west of Vernon. He was the father of B.F. LINTON of our city and had been seriously ill for 2 weeks. He leaves his companion of 51 years and the following children: Clarence of Decatur; Viness, Mrs. Cecil JONES and Mrs. Eugene LEININGER of Vernon.

- W. L. GREEN has received word that his son, Lyle W. has been promoted from 2nd Lieutenant to 1st Lieutenant. Lyle is now serving overseas in the Southwest Pacific.

- Sgt. and Mrs. Robert SQUIBB have a baby boy, Robert Glen, Jr., born in Salem Hospital on Sept. 16. The mother was the former Lillian JACKSON, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earl JACKSON of Alma.

- Here’s a nice letter from T. Sgt. Rex GAMMON, who is stationed in India. He is making an extensive study of the lives of these people as can be seen in the interesting letter which follows: Salam Sahib: In case you haven’t received a letter bearing a similar salutation, it’s translation is, "Peace be unto you, sir!" Or simply, "Good day, sir!" Anyway it’s meaning is the equivalent of "Dear J.N." even though Columbus was wrong and it isn’t from 1 Indian to another Indian. When one starts to write of life in India, he hardly knows where to start and once started it is difficult to find a place to stop. Naturally your interests are going to lie in the direction of politics and the press, so to the best of my ability and within the limits of military restriction and censorship, I’ll try to concentrate on those 2 subjects. Variety is the one word which describes most accurately everything in India, regardless of what the topic of discussion may be - the one exception to this is possibly the weather. This exception can be simply described as "too hot", "too cold", "too wet", and "too dry". I have been subjected to the "too hot" and "too wet" seasons and can’t think of a better way to describe them. The variety of customs, languages, and political institutions is based on the many religions observed. Most of the religions are strange and fascinating to an American, due to their contrast to Christianity. The majority of Indian population follows the God Bramna, creator of everything in the world. They are known as Hindus. Every Hindu is born into the caste system from which it is difficult to rise. One must live, work and marry within the limits of his caste. Second to the Hindus are the Mohammedans, a little closer to our own religious observances. They pray 5 times a day, facing the direction of the Mecca, their Holy City. "Allah is Allah, there is no God but Allah, and Mohammed is his prophet." Fewer in number but worthy of mention are the Sikhs, Gurkhas and Parrsies. The Sikhs follow ten teachers known as Gurus. They make very good soldiers. One needs on a moment’s glance to realize a Sikh, with his long hat and beard, would be a tough customer if aroused. The Gurkhas are Hindus, but differ from the main classification in that they, too, are fighters. The Hindu, who believe in reincarnation, naturally does not kill anything which possess life. The Gurkhas make up a large percentage of the Indian Army. The Parsies follow, Zoraster as their prophet. They dispose of their dead by place them in towers, where they are devoured by vultures. Perhaps you are wondering what all this has to do with politics? The political parties are based on these different religious beliefs. Every Indian, every political organization has Indian Independence foremost in mind. The National Congress based on the Hindu trend of though, is the leading party, sine the Hindus out number the others. Ghandi is their leader - he needs no introduction. The Muslim League, the Mohammedan party, is championed by Mr. Zinnah. The Sikhs have their own party but are too few in number. There are also a couple of minor parties. The trouble arises that in case of independence, none of these parties want to leave with the others. The present plan, under much discussion and arousing world wide attention is Pakistan. This plan would give the National Congress political control where the Hindus are in majority - the Muslim League control where the Mohammedan predominate. Some one evidently forgot to think about the Sikhs. The Indian Press is divided among the different parties. News reports are usually poorly written and a proof reader has surely never been heard of, as the errors in the papers are numerous and often misleading. Censorship regulations are less rigid than in the United States - editorials are often very frank. I’ve read articles the American editor wouldn’t dare to print. Wesbrook Pegler could really go to town in the Indian Press. I’ve just started receiving the Express again and I’ll certainly be glad when I can once again get back on good American soil. Incidentally, I have not run across who doesn’t share that same opinion. I wish to thank you for the paper - though the news is a little late - it is still news - 12,000 miles away from the old hometown. Everyone seems to share the opinion that the termination of the war will once again restore him to civilian life, where he can practice a little individualism. The Army days will be pleasant when one recalls acquaintances made. I’ve made many friends, which otherwise would never have been made. I’ve a little story to tell of one of them. Similar stories appear in "Time" and "Newsweek". This one is worthy of being printed though it may never see the ink. In February I walked in the same barracks and on the bunk next to mine was a Master Sergeant - I noticed his shipping code was the same as mine. Within a few days I knew a lot about E. FOX (M. Sgt.) And I learned to respect him for his individualism. He had been in the Army, since the mobilization of the National Guard, but he was still a civilian at heart. FOX wasn’t a G.I. Joe as we term anyone, who sticks to the letter and goes by the book alone. He had walked out of O.C.I. with only a day between him and the gold bars. FOX and I lived and worked together until a few weeks ago. When FOX left he was still the same boy who walked away from the gold bars - he liked to be an individual. He had been condemned several times because he liked to use his resourcefulness. We’ve just gotten a report came that FOX had recently foiled the Japs and saved the lives of several officers and men. The report also says he has been given the Silver Star. He’s the kind of a guy who would put it away in his barracks bag and forget where he put it. Given everyone my best regards, and thanks again for the paper.

- Here’s a letter from Pvt. Ralph JENKINS, better known as Pug, who is doing his bit in France. He says: Well, Mr. VALLOW, I have been in France for some time now, also my brother is over here but I haven’t had a chance to see him as yet. I tried awful hard to see him while we were both in France, but never got to see him. We get mail from each other in one day’s time so we can’t be too far apart. I haven’t seen any one that I know since I have been over here, but hope to one of these days. I met one boy from Kell, Ill. I was talking to him and he knew Harry BURGE and family, but that is the closest one that I’ve ever met from home. We sure are mopping up these Germans and make no different of what you hear on the radio, take my advice because I know as I am over here. We are really driving hard and fast. I don’t see how this war can last much longer and I am sure by Christmas time, we will see the end of it and what a happy bunch of boys there’s going to be in France. General PATTON and the boys in the tanks are really doing some splendid work. The war news certainly sounds good and it is good. I was working up in the front lines with Charles KLINE’s division and did we turn the heart on these Germans. I will have a few stories to tell you when I get back. Oh did I say a few? Sure would like to see some nice weather. It has been very chilly and it has been raining almost every day for over a week and it certainly makes it bad over here trying to sleep, etc. and especially when we eat. When we go through the chow line and it is raining it’s awful because by the time one gets started eating his messkit is full of water. The sun has started shining now but it is likely to cloud up and rain before long. Anyway, I certainly hope it doesn’t because I have a little washing that I should do. Sure am glad when I get my washing done, so I can get my correspondence caught up. Got a paper last night, first one I have got for a long time, and I certainly enjoyed it very much, believe me. It was the paper about PFC Henry HINKLEY of Alma being killed in action. Sure hated to hear of that and also about Manuel WELSH. Wish I could write to these people and try to express my sympathy toward them, because I know what these boys went through with, especially Manuel, as I was on the front lines the day he got killed. As I said, I would like to express my sympathy. I will in this letter to their folks and relatives, they can read this in the paper. Anyway, they gave their lives for a great country in the world. Although, I know how they feel about the situation. Well folks, maybe this war won’t last so long. Anyway I know you all back home are hoping and praying just like we are doing over here. I don’t see how this thing can last much longer. Mr. VALLOW, I’m sending you a couple of pieces of French money, paper bills. I am sending you a five franc note as a souvenir. It is worth 10 cents in our money back there. France is a beautiful country. It has beautiful grain fields. There are hardly any barb-wire fence, mostly thick hedge rows and rocks for fences. This area where we are at now is very beautiful. We can see for miles and miles. The people over here are rationed terrible. They get 3 cigarettes a day and a package of French cigarettes cost $3 a package here. Of course, all the soldiers get plenty of cigarettes through the cigarette manufacturing companies, who sends cigarettes to the Armed Forces. The people here, practically all of them, wear wooden shoes. They are certainly awful to look at besides trying to wear them. We trade cigarettes now and then for eggs. The French says F.’s and it is spelled aeuf in French. I have tried to learn French from them, but can’t and it sounds crazy. I hope I get out of here before I do learn it. Well, I suppose, the peaches are in full swing by now, how I could enjoy a good one to eat right this minute. From your paper I see where all of my buddies are getting married, and I also see by the paper we get over here and the radio that the St. Louis Cardinals are going fine, and I’m sure glad of that, as they are my team. Hope that the St. Louis Browns win the American League Pennant. What a time I would have if I was there. I would like to see them play. Only hope that the Cardinals win the world series. Well, Mr. VALLOW, I suppose you are tired of hearing me blow off, so will close for this by saying thanks for your paper and keep the good work up and maybe it won’t last much longer. Well so long for this time and tell everyone hello and here’s hoping to see every one real soon.

- T.S. and Mrs. Joseph G. VALLOW of Battle Creek, Mich. spent the week here with relatives.

- Mrs. W.H. HOUSE, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A.H. MILLER, returned home Monday. She is a graduate dietitian of Walter Reed Hospital, Washington, D.C. The last several months she has been at Lovell General Hospital, Fort Devens, Mass.

- Mrs. Chas. ROBB and daughter, Norma Gail, of Decatur, spent the first of this week here with Mrs. Elizabeth ATKINS and other relatives.

- Mrs. Mary FORD of Farina returned to her home Sunday after a week’s visit here with Miss Anna KOLB.

- Omega: It is reported that Gene Avon BEARD, of Siloam district, who is in the U.S. Navy is seriously ill in a Washington D.C. Hospital.

- Omega: Mr. and Mrs. Byron SILL have a new baby girl born last week.

- East Meadow Branch: Harold ROBB arrived early Monday morning from Wisconsin to spend an 11 day furlough with his wife and parents.

- East Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. W.F. ROBB attended a basket dinner at the Bert GARRETT home Sunday.

- East Meadow Branch: Mrs. Esta ROBB spent last week with her daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Dale HAMMER and family at Sumner.

- East Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. T.A. McCULLEY called at the Riley HARGIS home in Salem Sunday. John W. McCULLEY and the HARGIS boy, who were friends, recently met in New Guinea and spent a couple of hours together and made arrangements for spending a day together, which they enjoyed. The HARGIS boy has been in 132 bombings.

- Pleasant Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Clyde HIESTAND attended a LYNCH Reunion Sunday at the Park in Salem.

- Wilson School: PFC Henry CHARLTON, who has been in the Hawaiian Islands for the past 2 years, arrived home Monday evening having been given an honorable discharge from the army owing to age.

- Miss Laura Jean GREEN of Olney spent the weekend here with her father, W.L. GREEN, and Beryl and Louise.

Sept. 28, 1944:

- Here’s a nice letter from Pvt. Charles DISS, who is in France, and from the way he writes, this country must be very interesting. He says: Hello there and how is everything going? Just fine I suppose. I have been on the go and haven’t done very much writing and I haven’t received any paper since I left the good old U.S.A. But they should be catching up with me now as we are settled for awhile and I do mean settled. We moved into a big old hotel yesterday and it is really nice. There are 2 of us to a room, with nice double beds, well, everything that a hotel has but running water and maids. But they say on up at Paris, they even have that. It is certainly different than we have been having. The French people are very different than what the English were. I walked down through town this morning and almost all of them have come back now and are fixing up their houses. We find a few who speak English, but as for most of them, we have to use sign language. That is a rather slow procedure when a fellow sees a nice girl and wants to get acquainted. But we usually manage, somehow. There are lots of very nice looking girls, but I still say there isn’t any like back in the states. As soon as we can go on up and take care of a certain guy and his gang, I’ll be ready to come back to good old Kinmundy. So I guess this is about all for now and I have to clean our room up so until next time. So long for now. P.S. This hotel was very recently occupied by some guys who left in a hurry to go toward home.

- Mrs. Nancy NEIL died at her home in this city Saturday of a heart attack. She was arising as usual on this morning and was dressing. She joked a little with her daughter, Mrs. Paulene JOHNSON, and told Paulene to go ahead and get the breakfast that she would soon be with her. But shortly Paulene heard her fall. Running to her, she found her lying on the floor beside her bed. She immediately summoned Dr. MILLER but before he could arrive, she had passed away. Services were held from the Methodist Church with interment in the family lot in Evergreen Cemetery. Nancy Ann, second daughter of William A. and Margaret SHRIVER, was born in Manchester, Ohio on April 28, 1859 and came to Illinois with her parents at an early age, residing here and on a farm 3˝ miles southeast of Kinmundy. At an early age she was converted and united with the Methodist Church of this city remaining a member her entire life. In 1885 she married Charles Sumner NEIL, who died Feb. 12, 1916. They had 5 children, 4 of whom survive: Mrs. Paulene JOHNSON, at home; William Loyd of Chicago; Charles Walter and Harry Sumner of Flint, Mich.; 1 daughter dying in infancy. Also 3 grandchildren: Phyllis Eileen and Ann Marie of Flint, Mich, and Staff Sergeant Ben Neil JOHNSON of Mitchell Field, N.Y. She is also survived by 2 nieces: Mrs. Margaret SHUFELDT of Kinmundy and Mrs. Margaret MEMICK of Greely, Colo.; and 1 nephew, Charles EBNOTHER of Stockton, Calif. She died at her home in Kinmundy on Sept. 23, 1944, having resided at her present home for the past 55 years.

- John BORING, Bkr 1 c U.S.N.R., son of Mr. and Mrs. John BORING of Salem and Miss Mae CHERRY, daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Heber CHERRY of Salem were married Sept. 21 at the home of the bride. Mrs. Wilbert KURRELMEYER, sister of the bride, and James OSBORNE, midshipman, cousin of the groom, were the attendants. The mother gave a reception for the guests. Those were: Mr. and Mrs. Paul SWIFT, Mrs. Roy MULVANY and daughter, Martha, Mrs. Ervin CHERRY and daughter, Lorene, and children, John BORING and family, and Heber CHERRY and family.

- Mr. and Mrs. Pete MILLER celebrated their 56th wedding anniversary quietly on Sept. 26th. They were dinner guests of Mrs. Victoria JACKSON and 1 guest, James MONTGOMERY of Breese, was present.

- Rev. Lisle E. MEWMAW of the Kinmundy Methodist Church has been reappointed for another term. They have been here for 2 years.

- Claude RAINEY, 63, retired Alma merchant and Claude HOLMES, 45, St. Louis, were critically injured at 6 p.m. on Saturday when their cars collided at the Iuka-Highway 50 crossing. Mrs. HOLMES received a fractured collar bone and lacerations to both legs. Harry RAINEY, 58, brother to Claude, who was driving, escaped injury. Both cars were badly wrecked. The RAINEY brothers had delivered a load of livestock to Clarence HOLSAPPLE in Iuka and were northbound just turning onto the highway at the Iuka corner, when the west bound HOLMES car crashed into the RAINEY car. Mr. and Mrs. HOLMES, who were driving to St. Louis, were taken to Salem Hospital by a passing motorist. The McMackin ambulance was called to take Claude RAINEY to the hospital. RAINEY received a skull fracture while HOLMES suffered a chest injury and a fractured pelvis.

- Clyde HANNA, one of our local horsemen, and partner of Charles WORKMAN of Joplin, Mo., owners of "Plush", a free for all trotter, and "Peter Lawful" finished at Brownstown Saturday, 10 weeks of successful racing in Illinois and Missouri and was shipped out on Monday to Kalamazoo, Mich. for 4 weeks of racing in Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio.

- Green Ridge (from last week): The ladies of this community met at the school house Tuesday afternoon and made plans for a Community Club for the coming year. The following officers were elected: Mrs. Rada CALDWELL, Pres.; Chas. TOCKSTEIN, V. Pres.; Mrs. Linnie POLANKA, Sec’y. It was decided that the club would sponsor a pie supper to be held at the school house Oct. 4, and the proceeds to be used to buy food for warm lunches to serve the pupils. After the business meeting, the ladies enjoyed an exchange of houseplant cuttings. We are all looking forward to an enjoyable and interesting year of the club meeting.

- Green Ridge (from last week): Mrs. Linnie POLANKA was in Farina Friday to see her brother, Harold, who was home on furlough.

- Green Ridge (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Dwight PURCELL received a letter last week from their son, Carl, stating that he was improving nicely from his wound which he received in action.

- Mrs. Margaret GRAY is enjoying company of 2 of her sons, both in the Navy. John is here from the South Pacific, and Charles from Florida. The youngest son, Frederick, is somewhere in England in the Air Corps.

- Mrs. Edward HOHLT left Friday for Hammond, Ala. to spend several weeks and to attend the Golden Wedding Anniversary of her sister, Mr. and Mrs. Edward RICHARDSON.

- Sherman: Louis BORCHELT of Decatur spent Saturday and Sunday in the George SOLDNER home and attended the funeral of Mrs. Howard KRUSE in Loogootee.

- Omega: Mrs. Helen MILLICAN has received word that her husband, See MILLICAN, has arrived in New Guinea.

- Pleasant Grove: Several from here attended the funeral of Mrs. Mollie MUNDWILER, at the Old Baptist Church, Friday. She was 94 years old, and had 1 son, Van MUNDWILER, and several grandchildren.

- Pleasant Grove: Pvt. Roy MILLER of Scott Field spent the last of the week with his wife and daughters.

- Ph M1c Charles MINER of Florida arrived Tuesday to visit his father, H.E. MINER.

- Arnold Chapel: A kitchen shower and charivari was held at the Cleve McWHIRTER home for Mr. and Mrs. Ted CALDWELL.

- Arnold Chapel: Cpl. Roy GARRETT has arrived in England.

- Arnold Chapel: Miss Katherine SOUTIER had her tonsils removed at the Vandalia Hospital last Tuesday.

Oct. 5, 1944:

- Here’s a dandy letter from Pvt. Merle SCHNEIDER, who is doing his best to corral the Japs. He says: It is with a good deal of pleasure and warm feeling of not being forgotten that I say: Thank you for what you are doing". I can truthfully say, that the regular issue of The Kinmundy Express, and the fact that I have been fortunate enough to receive most of the copies up to this date, have given me much more pleasure than any other publication I have found time to read. Needless to say, I shall always find pleasure reading them. The old days of civilian living is far behind me. I have been in the Army now for some time. If one must travel from home, he might as well come back a better and wiser man. I certainly am becoming a lot. I know war is hell! That men far from home yearn eagerly for return to their own folk, to their native land. I know all men who are soldiers, be they privates or the highest officers, all think the same thoughts of home and loved ones, dream the same dream. Mostly, I know that most of us want more than anything on earth to get this job over, to win the war completely and then, at last, to come home and live and let live I have had hard training, traveled many miles and had long weary marches through jungles and some of the roughest terrains. I know it takes much to become a good fighting man. Above all, I am prepared to do my best and no matter what is yet to come, I know it means a great to fight for the peace and love which I long to return to. My home, my folks, and all my friends, I have missed so much. Every day my thoughts sought out those memories and I realize now more than ever what having a home and friends really means. Well, I shall be back soon I hope and believe me, I’ll know a better appreciation for all those things than that which I knew. Though I haven’t written before, you have not been absent from my remembrance. I should have let you hear from me but somehow there always comes a time when one feels a duty must be recognized. Sorry it has taken me so long but never the less, it certainly is privilege. My present moods are entirely as good as can be wished, and in spite of all, I am in very excellent health and doing exceptionally well for myself. In regard to all my friends, I sure hope this letter will be read by most of them as so they shall know I how I really feel. Mr. VALLOW, I am very grateful to you for your kind thoughts and services. With this, I know, it’s folks like yourself who make it all seem a glorious sacrifice and which is well worth fighting for. And so I close with happy thoughts of meeting again soon. My fondest wishes and God bless all of you.

- Here’s another letter from Pvt. Charles DISS, who is still in France. He says: Just a line to say, hello and thank you again for the paper. I just received them a few days ago and even though they were a couple of months old, they were still chuck full of news from the old Home Town. Of course, there is plenty of news being made here where we are, but there is nothing like news from home. Since I last wrote you, I have seen much of the country here in France which you older fellows saw when you were over here a few years back. Just the other day, we come through one of the nicest towns I have yet seen anywhere over here. It might as well be called the New York of France. It was really nicer than I ever expected to see. All the French people seem very glad to see us. Even though they don’t speak English, the majority of the children have learned to say, "any gum chum?" But to top that off I read in the Stars and Stripes today where the German children have also started it. That, I think, is one of the most well known slogans of this war. Even though we don’t get a whole lot of it, it makes a fellow feel good to give some little boy or girl a piece of gum or candy. Well, I guess this is about all for now, so until next time. Bye for now.

- Here’s one from PFC See MILLICAN, who is somewhere in New Guinea. He says: How is every little thing in good old Kinmundy? I don’t think New Guinea will ever amount to much as it is too far from Kinmundy. But laying all jokes aside, it is not too bad here. We have 6 men tents with good old terra firma for a floor and Army cots to sleep on. We also have a theater with a show every night. We use split coconut logs for seats. They have about as large crowds at the show as they do at the Salem Reunion. The dust here is about 5 times as thick as at the reunion too. I went on a pass today and I expect you wonder where a fellow could go in the jungle. I went down to the Red Cross and got some cold coke, the only place here where you can get a cold drink. We saw a number of natives in their colorful and abbreviated costumes. They are very friendly and greet you with a "Hello Joe, got a smoke?" and if you give one fellow the rest will devil the life out of you for a cigarette. We got a cocoanut but they cost you a florin, which is 32 cents in our money. They use Australian money entirely here. They even pay us here in Australia money. This week they gave us ration coupons for 3 bottles of beer and a carton of cigarettes. We can buy 2 candy bars a day when they have then at the PX. Also they let us have a package of gum. It must be pre-war stuff as it is wrapped in tin foil. All the comforts we have here we have to make ourselves. Wooden boxes serve as tables, chairs and writing desk. Wood and fountain pens, writing paper and pocket knives are scarce as hens teeth here. I doubt if you can read this as I am finishing it by candle light. I haven’t received a Kinmundy Express lately, but they will no doubt catch up with me sometime. In fact, I haven’t received any mail from the States since I left them. We had to take time out just now to rig up a couple of lamps to write by. We used our last candle so we had to get a couple of beer cans full of kerosene and put some rope in for a wick. You would be surprised at how much light they make. The smoke helps keep the mosquitoes out. I know that you don’t have time to write the boys, Norris, but you just keep the Kinmundy Express coming to all the boys in the service and I’m sure they will thank you and the folks back home who made it possible with their generous contributions. Here is wishing you and yours the best and hoping for complete Victory in forty-four.

- According to a release received from Headquarters of the Sixth Service Command, PFC Lawrence H. BASSETT, who is now attached to the detached enlisted men’s list, is returning home from 29 months overseas in the Southwest Pacific Theater of Operations. He was supposed to reach Ft. Sheridan, Ill., the reception center, yesterday and in all probability will arrive here today or tomorrow to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E.O. BASSETT.

- Mr. and Mrs. Ruben GARNER have received word from their son, Dwight, stating that he had been promoted to Water Tenderman, 1 c. He is stationed on a new destroyer, somewhere in the South Pacific.

- The Annual Kinmundy Picnic was held Sept. 24, 1944 at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Dave WATKINS in Los Angeles. There were 45 in attendance.

- L.S. LACEY, 83, died at his home in Meacham twp. Sunday after a brief illness. Services will be held from the Union Church in Meacham twp. with interment in Elder Cemetery. He was a life-long resident of Meacham twp. and was a highly respected farmer and stockman. He suffered a stroke of apoplexy. He leaves a son, Percy, who with his wife moved into the homeplace to care for his father shortly after the death of the mother a few years ago.

- Mr. and Mrs. Harold MORRIS have a baby girl born Sunday. They now have 2 boys and a girl.

- Mr. and Mrs. Ben JENKINS have received a letter of commendation, which was presented to their son, Pvt. Ralph E. JENKINS. The letter reads: "One litter platoon and air ambulance section from the 429th Medical Collecting Company were attached to the 307th Airborne Medical Collecting Company during operations in the La Haye Du Puits area July 3 to 6. The superior manner in which this group operated in their first combat mission, repeatedly volunteering for work in forward areas and working throughout this period without relief, was exemplary. Their assistance in this operation materially contributed to the rapid evacuation of the wounded from front lines. It is my pleasure to commend the officer and men of this detachment of the Medical Collecting Company for their outstanding performances of duty." M.B. RIDGAY, Major General, U.S. Army, Commanding.

- George BARGH, Jr. enrolled this week as a Freshman in the Univ. of Ill., Urbana.

- Charles SEE, S2 c returned Monday to his base in Florida after spending leave here with his mother, Mrs. Margaret GRAY and John.

- Mr. and Mrs. R.E. SIMONS and Mrs. Florence HARMON of Centralia spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Bryan PITTS. Evening callers were Lewis MERCER of the Navy and wife, Ruby, of Washington, D.C.

- Charles E. BLOMBERG left Wednesday for Urbana, Ill. where he will enter the U. of I. Charles celebrated his birthday last Saturday.

Oct. 12, 1944:

- 1st Lieutenant Roy G. DOOLEN writes: Never before in my life have I put so much work into such a short period of time, as I have in the last couple of months. My outfit has led this race, for Germany such as no outfit but the calvary can do. It has cost many lives, and as I look at the pretty green pine forests concealing the famed ‘Siegfreid Line", I realize it will cost many more lives to go on through to Berlin. But the American Army has pushed forward with such spirit that German troops turn and flee at the sign of them. On their own soil however, the German are a little tougher. My outfit got quite a writeup over here for being the first Americans in Paris. The city is very beautiful and gay in spite of the war. I could write many pages on the interesting things that have happed to me so far, but the same things are happening to thousands of other soldiers. The complete story will come out when we all get home and spin our yards in the old barber shop or on the street corner. I hope that won’t be too long. Your paper hasn’t caught up with me for quite a while. I sure miss it. It keeps me up to date on the home front. Here’s hoping it catches up with me soon. Best of luck to all at home.

- Mr. and Mrs. Fred CRAIG of this city quietly celebrated their 45th wedding anniversary Wednesday. Mrs. Effie WINFREE of Nashville, Ill., an aunt of Mrs. CRAIG, was a supper guest. Mrs. Prudence WILKINSON of this city, another aunt was unable to be with them.

- Mrs. Lois ROBB has word that her son, John Robert, has been promoted from Captain to Major. Major ROBB is serving in China.

- Mrs. Fred BOYD left Tuesday night to visit with her husband for 2 weeks in New York.

- Mr. and Mrs. Francis HAMMER and daughter spent Sunday in Sumner with Mr. and Mrs. Dale HAMMER and family.

- PFC and Mrs. Harvey HEADLEY of Chicago announce the arrival of a baby girl. PFC HEADLEY is a patient in the Gardner General Hospital in that city.

- Miss Martha STROUPE of Mt. Vernon and Kenneth E. JACKSON, A.R.M. 3 c U.S.N.A. Corps were married Sept. 17th in the First Methodist Church at Corpus Christi, Texas. They were attended by Mr. and Mrs. RIGHTNOAR of Mt. Vernon. The bride is a graduate from Kinmundy H.S. and attended the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

- The Fourth Annual Meet of the Kinmundy Fox Hunters Association was help Sept. 25, 26, and 27th in the A.O. CHARLTON Grove. A large crowd attended each afternoon and night. We have more than 100 paid up members for 1945.

Results of Chase:

Derby Fox Hound Chase: 1st - Delno HOPPER of Beecher City, Ill.; 2nd - Delno HOPPER of Beecher City, Ill.

All age and Final Fox Hound Chase: 1st - Dresden DORR of Alma; 2nd - Jas. WASSEM of Patoka; 3rd - Jas. WASSEM of Patoka.

Bench Show:

Derby Fox Hounds: Male, 1st - Delno HOPPER of Beecher City

Female: 1st and 2nd - Delno HOPPER of Beecher City

All Age Fox Hound Bench Show:

Male: 1st - Pearl EASLEY of Salem; 2nd - Jas. WASEM of Patoka; 3rd - Dresden DORR of Alma

Female: 1st - Jas. WASEM of Patoka; 2nd - Jas. WASEM of Patoka.

Grand Prize: Pearl EASLEY of Salem.

Fiddlers Contest: 1st - Charles MULVANEY of Kinmundy; 2nd - Jess WOODEN of Alma; 3rd - Mike BUTTS of Kinmundy.

Women’s Horn Blowing Contest: 1st - Mrs. Edith MULVANEY of Kinmundy; 2nd - Mrs. Mildred COLCLASURE; 3rd - Lottie May MULVANEY of Kinmundy.

Men’s Horn Blowing Contest: 1st - Harry NICHOLS of Farina; 2nd - Delno HOPPER of Beecher City; 3rd - Mess F. MOORE of Effingham.

Oldest Married Couple on the Grounds: Mr. and Mrs. Leonard WEST of Kinmundy.

Jig Dance Contest: 1st - Steve MULVANEY of Kinmundy; 2nd - Morton MULVANEY of Kinmundy; 3rd - Harley LOGAN of Kinmundy.

Hog Calling Contest: 1st - Harry NICHOLS of Farina; 2nd - Pat ORR of Alma; 3rd - Jess F. MOORE of Effingham.

Girl’s Jig Dance: 1st - Eloris DYER of Kinmundy; 2nd - Lottie May MULVANEY of Kinmundy.

Ugliest Man: 1st - Harve COX of Beecher City; 2nd - Morton MULVANEY of Kinmundy; 3rd - Harry NICHOLS of Farina.

Cow Calling Contest: 1st - Mrs. Zetta WOODEN of Alma; 2nd - Mrs. Clifton LEMAY of Kinmundy.

Parent of Most Sons in the Service: Jess F. MOORE of Effingham.

- On Sept. 29th at Salem Memorial Hospital, a 7 lb. girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. Herschel SIMMONS, named Mary Lee. The mother was formerly Mira HEADLEY, who has taught several years in the rural schools of the county. The father is employed by the County Highway Dept.

- Mrs. Clifton LEMAY has received word from her husband that he arrived safely overseas.

- Mrs. Leo DONOVAN of Springfield received word that her husband, Capt. DONOVAN has arrived safely overseas. She also heard in a round about way that he broke his arm on his way over.

- WARNING: To the party or parties who have been in the habit of window-peeping or snooping around homes during the night time, take fair warning or take the consequences. C.A. BOONE, Mayor.

- Pvt. Kenneth Paul CALDWELL, Alma Lad, Dies From Wounds Received in Action in Germany: A telegram was received by Mrs. Paul CALDWELL of Alma Friday morning, stating that her husband, Pvt. Kenneth Paul CALDWELL, had been seriously wounded in action in Germany, on Sept. 17th. On Monday morning she received another telegram stating that her husband had died of wounds on Sept. 17th. This was a shock to the community of Alma as well as our own community as he was well known here. Kenneth Paul, son of Mr. and Mrs. Oscar CALDWELL, was born March 3, 1911, on Zion Prairie in Foster twp. On March 31, 1934, he was married to Miss Rada GARRETT, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Selby GARRETT. After their marriage, they lived a short while in Vandalia where Paul was employed by the Hayes Bros. Hatchery. Then they moved to Alma where he was employed as a clerk in the Wilson Store and the Rainey Store. In 1941, he assumed the management of the C.A. Glore Lumber Yard, which position he held when he entered the services of his country. He was inducted into the army on Dec. 29, 1943, was shipped overseas, landing in England on July 1st. Here he remained until July 21st when he crossed the channel into France. He was a member of the infantry. Besides his beloved companion and parents, he leaves 2 brothers, PFC Loren CALDWELL in the Southwest Pacific, and Marion of Wilmington, Ill. After reaching England, Paul wrote to his wife that he had been converted and was leading the life of a true Christian. He was a member of Kinmundy Lodge No. 398, A.F. & A.M., and his will be the first gold star to be put upon the service rolls of the lodge. The whole community extends heart-felt sympathy to the bereaved relatives.

- Charles MINER, Ph M 1c, returned to his station in Florida after a week’s visit when his father, H.E. MINER, and in Belleville with his sister, Mrs. Herbert MORROW.

- Mrs. Icy GARRETT spent last week in North Fork neighborhood visiting her children.

- Mrs. Alice SEE spent last week in Meacham twp. visiting her brother, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin HARRELL.

- Joe BRIMBERRY left Monday for his camp in Texas after a 10 day furlough here with his wife and children and parents.

- Sherman (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Glenn JAHRAUS and family and Mrs. Jennie JAHRAUS attended the birthday dinner at the Ed HARRELL home Sunday.

- Arnold Chapel (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Roy JONES of Patoka spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. James BASSETT.

- Arnold Chapel (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Peck CONANT and children called at the Chas. ARNOLD home Saturday night.

- East Meadow Branch (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. W.F. ROBB and son, Harold and wife, spent Sunday, Sept. 4 at Sumner with Mr. and Mrs. Dale HAMMER and children.

- East Meadow Branch (from last week): T5 Harold W. ROBB left Friday for camp after spending his furlough with his wife and parents, Velma ROBB and Mr. and Mrs. W.F. ROBB.

- East Meadow Branch (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. W.F. ROBB spent Sunday afternoon with Clyde BASSETT and family.

- Meadow Branch (from last week): James KENNEDY of Alma has been helping Fred CHANCE put up a new sheep barn.

- Swift School (from last week): Mrs. Kenneth ROBB and daughter, Judith Ann, went to Vandalia Thursday, and visited until Sunday with Mrs. Thomas BOONE and daughter, Sandra Sue.

- Swift School (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT and daughter, spent Thursday afternoon in Salem.

- Swift School (from last week): Mrs. Dale BALLANCE and 2 children and Mrs. Carroll GARRETT and 2 children spent part of last week in Decatur and Peoria with relatives.

- Swift School (from last week): Virgil LIVESAY and wife spent Sunday with Clyde GARRETT and family.

- Swift School (from last week): Mrs. Virginia MONTGOMERY and son, Paul Eugene, left Monday for Texas to near her husband, Paul.

- Swift School (from last week): Mack ROBB and wife and son, Sammy, spent Sunday evening near Alma with Selby GARRETT and wife.

- Swift School (from last week): Donna Mae GARRETT spent Saturday night and Sunday in Kinmundy with Lela Mae DOOLEN.

- Swift School (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Orville GARRETT and Mrs. Margaret GRAMLEY of Kinmundy went to Hammond, Ind. Thursday and visited until Sunday with Mrs. Kenneth LECKRONE and son, Garrett.

- Young School (from last week): Lyman JONES and family and Clyde MULVANY were in Farina Saturday night. They also called on Mr. and Mrs. Pete WHITE to see the new baby.

- Mr. and Mrs. Fred ALEXANDER have received word from their son, Xon, in Camp Crowder, stating he has been promoted to Corp.

Oct. 19, 1944:

- Mr. and Mrs. Myron DEIWERT celebrated their 59th wedding anniversary last Sunday in Everett, Wash. It was a 2 way observance for Mr. DEIWERT was 20 years of age on his wedding day, so his birthday was also honored. First the family group enjoyed a family dinner in Seattle, Wash. and then Mr. and Mrs. Myron H. SWARM held a reception and tea at their new home in Seattle to honor their grandparents, at which their 2 year old daughter, Marnita Ann was christened.

- Several relatives and friends gathered at the home of Mrs. Sarah HAMPSTEN of Yale last Sunday to help her celebrate her 83rd birthday. A list of those present was included.

- Sunday being the 22nd wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. BLOMBERG, the following relatives gathered at their home with well filled baskets to celebrate the occasion: Mr. and Mrs. Orville DISS and son, Mr. and Mrs. Lowell DISS and son, Mr. and Mrs. Francis HAMMER and daughter, and Miss Beulah DISS.

- Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD returned home Saturday from a week’s visit in Waterloo, Ia. with her daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde BECHTELHEIMER. Mrs. ARNOLD was accompanied by her daughter, Pearl, of Springfield, Ill.

- James (Red) HAMMER, GM 3 c, surprised every one Wednesday by dropping in for a 30 day furlough. This is Red’s first trip home since he enlisted in the Navy 4 years ago. Needless to say every body is happy to see Red and Red is happy to be home.

- Mr. and Mrs. Louie JEZEK announce the wedding of their daughter, Clarine, to Pvt. Harry W. FLOHR of Chicago on Oct. 7, 1944.

- On Oct. 14 in the Methodist Church in Morganfield, Ky. occurred the marriage of Miss Leona Eileen JACKSON, oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C.G. JACKSON of this city, and Edward J. ESSARY of McLeansboro. The couple were attended by Mr. and Mrs. G.P. ROBERTSON and Miss Ellen GAINEY. The couple are living in Carmi, Ill. Mr. ESSARY is employed by the Acme Butane Co. of that city. Mrs. ESSARY was a graduate of our local high school in 1943. For the past year she has been employed in Salem.

- Ellis BUTTS, a well known farmer in Meacham twp., and Mrs. Effis JOHNSON, residing west of this city, were married in Salem on Oct. 10. They were attended by Mrs. Delmar BUTTS and Miss Reba MILLICAN. The couple are at home on the Zola WILSON farm east of Omega.

- Mr. and Mrs. Ellis WILKINSON have received word from their son, PFC Kenneth M. WILKINSON, stating that he was the recipient of the Combat Infantryman Badge for exemplary conduct in action against the enemy during the Biak, Dutch New Guinea operation. He sent the extract of the award home for safe keeping.

- Mr. and Mrs. F.G. ALEXANDER received word Saturday that their grandson, Dale, son of Darrell and Frances ALEXANDER, had been killed in action in the Southwest Pacific. Dale was a Marine and only 19 years old. He had been in the service for 13 months. We are truly sorry to learn of this sad news. Dale was a very likable chap and was a friend to everyone he met. He and his sister, Annette, attended school here in 1935 and ‘36 in the 4th and 5th respectively, living with their grandparents. They returned here 2 years later and made a public appearance in the gym as an acrobatic dancing team, which won them much favor. Dale graduated from a Chicago H.S. a year ago, and then enlisted as a Marine.

- A stock car was ordered set in the siding of the I.C. last weekend and on Monday morning, it was loaded with 24 horses by Halice LEWIS. And Halice said he loaded another car on the B. & O. at Salem the same day. These horses were shipped to market. Now this is really news and attracted the attention of a good many old-timers because this is the first carload of stock to be shipped via rail from this point for a good many years. This was a very common occurrence before the day of the hard road and truck. But because of the tire shortage, it may be revived again, who knows?

- Richard Frederick KILLIE, Jr. was born in Grant Hospital, Chicago, on Oct. 15, son of Mr. and Mrs. R.F. KILLIE of Chicago, and grandson of Mr. and Mrs. F.W. KILLIE of Centralia.

- Mrs. Harry GRAY, Jr. received word Monday that her husband had been wounded in action in France. His wounds are slight and he is hospitalized in England.

- Meacham (from last week): Mrs. Allie SEE returned to her home in Kinmundy Saturday after a week’s visit with her brother, Edwin HARRELL and wife.

- Pleasant Grove (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Ted MAYBERRY and son, Fred of St. Flora Repec, who is stationed at Ft. Benning, visited Saturday at the Pearl ROSE home.

- PFC Albert CORRELL of Texas came last Thursday to spend his 15 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. O.E. CORRELL.

Oct. 26, 1944:

- Pvt. William H. HILL, son of Mr. and Mrs. W.H. HILL, Killed in Action in Luxembourg: Again our little community has been dealt a blow by the horrors of war. This time we are extending heartfelt sympathy to Mr. and Mrs. W. Harley HILL who are grieving the loss of their only son. They received the message from the War Dept. yesterday morning stating their son, Pvt. William H. HILL had been killed in action in Luxembourg on Oct. 7th. This was, indeed, a hard blow to this couple because just a week ago they had received a long letter from their son, dated Oct. 3rd, in which he had stated that he was in Luxembourg and everything was going along alright. And we suppose it was but what a difference a few days can make. Pvt. William H., son of W. Harley and Ethel MERCER HILL, was born on the farm occupied for many years by this good family, south and east of Kinmundy, May 19, 1923. He attended the local schools here, being in this district. When he was in his sophomore year in high school, he enlisted in the army and was inducted on Jan. 17, 1942. He received his training in various camps and shipped overseas July 15, 1944, landing in England. His company did not stay very long in England but crossed the channel into France. He was a member of C. A, 774th Tank Battalion, being a gunner and a radio man. Bill, as we knew him, was a regular attendant at Chapel Services as was evidenced by the numerous letters received from his Chaplain. They also received several letters from his commanding officers telling them what a splendid soldier he was. Besides the bereaved parents, he leaves 3 sisters, Miss Myrtle, who is a teacher in the Lawrenceville, Ill. schools; Louise HATFIELD of Winterhaven, Fla.; and Rhea WILLIAMS of Chicago. The flag over our service board now floats at half-mast in honor of the memory of another lad who has given his last full measure of devotion for his country. And the name of Private Bill has been added to our list to be remembered when we face the east on Nov. 11th.

- Mrs. Alice SEE of our city, is reported quite ill in her home from gallstones. For a few days, Mrs. SEE was cared for in the home of her brother, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin HARRELL, in Meacham twp. Mrs. SEE is now being cared for by her daughters. We wish her a speedy and complete recovery.

- Mrs. Herman SCHNEIDER received a letter from their son, PFC Ervin SCHNEIDER that he landed safely in England.

- PFC Frederic H. SEE, son of Mrs. Margaret GRAY of this city, has won high commendation for helping to shatter world’s records for repairing aircraft at an Air Service Command depot in England. He and his fellow mechanics sent back into action the highest number of battle-damaged craft since Air Service Command began operations in England. "A knock out blow against Germany" was the way his Commanding General, Brigadier General Isaac W. OTT described the contribution of PFC SEE, whose extra effort makes it possible to maintain a constant air cover over allied armies on the Continent.

- Miss Virginia Sue JACKSON celebrated her 10th birthday on Oct. 15. Miss Lela Mae DOOLEN was a dinner guest.

- Mr. and Mrs. Herman SCHNEIDER received a Christmas greeting V-Mail from their son, Pvt. Merle SCHNEIDER, who is in New Guinea.

- James HAMMER, SM2 c has been visiting in East St. Louis, Ill.

- George H. BARGH, Jr. of the Univ. of Ill. spent Sunday here with his parents.

- Charles Lee DOOLEN, ARM3 c, spent part of last week in West Frankfort and Thompsonville with relatives.

- Mrs. Jennie HANNA suffered a stroke this week and is in serious condition. Her daughter, Mrs. Ruby LEE of Ludlow, came Wed. to assist in the care of her mother.

- Mr. and Mrs. Ellis WAINSCOTT of Tolono, Ill. will celebrate their 40th wedding anniversary on Oct. 29. They will enjoy open house on Sunday in the home of their son, Mr. and Mrs. John WAINSCOTT of Champaign. They are former Kinmundians. Mrs. WAINSCOTT was the former Jennie HUMPHREY, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Arthur HUMPHREY. Mr. WAINSCOTT is the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Isaac WAINSCOTT.

- PFC Allen BRASEL, Alma Lad, Loses Life in Action in Holland on Oct. 5th: Our neighboring village of Alma received more bad news yesterday when a telegram from the War Dept., addressed to Mr. and Mrs. Paul B. BRASEL stating their son PFC Allen Lawrence BRASEL, had been killed in action on Oct. 5, in Holland. This lad was well known in Meacham twp., also being the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas NEAL. The family also lived in Meacham twp. quite some time before moving to Alma. Allen, the eldest of 6 children, son of Paul B. and Sylvia NEAL BRASEL, was born in Taylorville on Feb. 29, 1924. He entered the service on Dec. 8, 1943, and received most of his training in South Carolina. He shipped overseas in June, 1944, landing in England and then on to France. His last furlough home was on May 5th, being granted 15 days before shipping overseas. The last letter received by the parents was dated Sept. 27. He was a member of the Co. E, 120th Infantry Battalion. PFC Allen was a good boy and no one has never heard naught about him. He was an ardent church worker and was a member of the Christian Church in Alma. Our hearts go out to this good family in their bereavement.

- Cadet and Mrs. John RIDLEY of California and Miss Shirley MILLER have been visiting with their mother, Mrs. Gail MILLER.

- Meacham (from last week): Mrs. Ira MERRITT visited Wednesday in Salem with her sister, Mrs. Carl GRUNDON and husband. They had just received a message stating that their son, Pvt. Donald GRUNDON, was reported missing in action.

- The program from the Singing Convention which was held at Brown Church Sunday was printed.

- Pleasant Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Joe MEDLEY and children moved last week from Brubaker to the Ralph HIESTAND farm. Mr. MEDLEY was home on a 9 day furlough recently.

- Pleasant Grove: Pvt. Roy MILLER of Scott Field spent Saturday and Sunday night with his family.

- Pleasant Grove: PFC Paul SMITH of Camp Campbell is spending a short furlough at the Ralph HIESTAND home.

- Swift School (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. R.H. GREEN and son, Keith, Carroll GARRETT and wife, Pearle GARRETT and daughter, Donna Mae, Mr. and Mrs. Arno SMITH of Centralia, Darrell ARNOLD and daughter of Breese helped Guy ARNOLD and wife moved to their new home they bought from Ren WAINSCOTT, Saturday.

- Swift School (from last week): Everyone in this vicinity was sorry to hear Paul CALDWELL had been wounded and died in Germany.

- Swift School (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT and daughter spent last Friday evening in Alma with Rada CALDWELL.

- Swift School (from last week): Wiona HANNA spent Saturday night and Sunday with Lila GARRETT.

- Swift School (from last week): Pearle GARRETT spent last Wednesday with her aunt, Mrs. Will JONES.

- Swift School (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Clyde BASSETT were business visitors in Effingham last Wednesday.

- Meadow Branch (from last week): Pvt. and Mrs. Robert G. MARSHALL of Cal. are here visiting their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ira MARSHALL and other relatives and friends.

- Omega (from last week): S.B. SMITH and Mr. and Mrs. Arthur GORDON and little daughter left Monday for Arizona where they have employment.

- Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Glen HAMPSTEN, Mr. and Mrs. Ira MARSHALL, and Pvt. Robert G. MARSHALL and wife went to Vandalia Sunday to attend the HENNINGER Family Reunion at the home of Miss Lillian HENNINGER.

- East Meadow Branch (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. W.F. ROBB spent Sunday afternoon at the Clyde BASSETT home.

- East Meadow Branch (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Leland BRASEL called at the W.F. ROBB home Monday night.

Nov. 2, 1944:

- A picture of Pvt. William H. HILL, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harley HILL, who was killed in action Oct. 7th in Luxembourg, was included in this edition.

- Here’s a short note from Cpl. Ray BAILEY, who is now in Belgium. He says: I have only time to write a few lines tonight. I received 5 papers in the past week, the first since I left England. I wish to thank you very much, as the hometown paper really means a lot to us over here. I like it better here in Belgium than I did in France. It is much colder here, but not so damp as in France. There are a lot of things I would like to tell you about, but I cannot, as yet. My time and paper are nearly gone so I will close for this time.

- Here’s a letter from Joseph LOVETT, S1 c, who is now doing duty on a LST. He says: Well, I suppose you think I have forgotten you and all the people in Kinmundy, but no such luck. That’s a town that will always be favorably remembered in my mind. I have just been too busy every minute to get a chance to write to anyone. Now for the events which have taken place since I last wrote to you. First of all, I was transferred from the Life Saving Station the 26th of June to Berkley Receiving Station in Norfolk, Va. On the first of July, I was again transferred, this time to the Amphibious Training Base, Camp Bradford, just outside Norfolk. I went into rigorous training there for about 2 months (including a 10 day cruise). Then I was sent to Pittsburg where I stayed a few days at the Carnegie Institute of Technology. I picked up my ship and proceeded down the river. I’ll not go into details as that may be military information. I’ll not explain what an LST is for. I think everyone knows that by now. They are playing a large part in all invasions now. I can’t say how I like them either for I’d rather tell the truth and the Navy Dept. might not appreciate my view points. I’m working in the office now doing general yeoman’s worker and hope to be a striker for the same. As time is getting closer to liberty time I better close and get a shave.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Merle BAYLIS, who is still taking in the sights of Italy. He says: Just a few lines to thank you for the paper and I want you to know I am very glad to get it. And by the paper I get a lot of news I would not know about if it were not for the paper. I am over here somewhere in Italy, and so far I am in the same territory from the time I landed here. The place is very attractive for scenery, mountains on 2 sides of us. I would like to mention more about this are, but the censor might begin to frown so I better not tell any more about this place. So far I can say for myself, I have been very luck this far. I have plenty of good food and a good place to sleep and I am working in the officers mess. I have also visited Napels several times and 2 different times I took the Red Cross bus and went to Pompei to see the ruins caused by Mt. Vesuvius which was uncovered around 2000 years ago, that is some of the city was uncovered. And it is very interesting to see how, the people lived in those days, and I went to see Mt. Vesuvius and also I went up to the very top along with some other boys. It was a hard climb, but it was worth it. Sure is a large crater and still smoking and I hope to tell you more about it when I see you. I only hope this war will soon come to a close and I think it will be over with Germany this year. I am sending in this letter 2 pieces of Italian money to you. One lire is Allied currency and the other lire is their original lire. The weather here at present is fine, only hope it continues that way. I suppose this is enough of this kind of writing, so I will close for this time.

- Here’s one from Ens. Orval SPURLIN, who is doing duty on a LCT. He says: I want to thank you greatly for sending me the Kinmundy Express. News over here is pretty scarious. Often times we read a magazine 3 or 4 years old. If we get one that is only 3 or 4 months old, we consider ourselves very lucky. We have a radio aboard our LCT, on which we receive the news broadcasts at various intervals. I’ve been in New Guinea, but now we’re moving north. If my writing becomes hard to read, it’s because the LCT is bouncing around. At this moment we’re under way with a load of priority cargo. The work on an LCT is very interesting, but it has it’s disadvantages. Being the only officer aboard, makes the job, doubly hard. When we get north; I’m supposed to get another officer aboard as my executive officer. The LCT is only a small landing craft and carries a complement of 13 in the crew, including myself. When the sea really gets rough, we find ourselves bouncing around all over the ocean, as these LCT’s have a flat bottom. The natives of New Guinea are funny looking people, small, busy headed, and black as the ace of spades. A few know how to talk a little English. It’s summer down here and every day we are getting nearer the equator, so you see it’s getting very hot during the day. We have an awning built over the aft end of our ship to protect us from the sun and rain. We live on deck, as our quarters stay pretty warm 24 hours a day. I also had them build an awning over the bridge, because I’m on the bridge most of the time and I really get sunburned. My biggest problems aboard ship are the personnel problems. When you get a 16 year old boy that has never been away from home in his life, you really have a problem. You have to act as a chaplain, father, doctor, and God only knows what all. It’s time to change watches, so I’d better stop and get my men posted.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Charles MEYERS, who is stationed in Mississippi. He says: Will try and drop you a line or 2, to let you know that I have changed my address. I’m still in this old state of Mississippi and it sure is one place that I was hoping I would soon be out of. How is everything around the old hometown these days? I sure would like to have been there and met some of the old gang when they were home. There sure isn’t much that I can tell about because news is the same as ever. I don’t think the weather ever does change here. It gets hotter than the devil in the day time but the nights are pretty cold. I guess you will have a pretty hard time making this writing of mine out. I’m trying to get done so I can got to town on a weekend pass. Have you ever been down to New Orleans? You should go down sometime, because it is a swell place. It has a lot of the old French buildings and old Spanish Haciendas. Well, it’s getting late so I had better bring this letter to a close so I can catch my bus. I’ll try and write sooner and more often than what I have been. So long and keep ‘em rolling.

- Here’s a dandy letter from Major John A. BROOM, Jr., who is still in Italy. He says: Yes, I’m in Italy - still the same place from which you last heard from me, but don’t let that fool you. Since that time I’ve seen much of it (Italy I mean) and in addition to that have been in Southern France for a short time. Speaking of the latter, I have never seen such contrast in countries in my life. France is more like some parts of the States I’ve seen. It’s clean; it’s beautiful; it doesn’t have the scars of war to the extent that Italy has, or at least the parts of Italy I’ve seen; the people are clean and cheerful; they are glad to see the Americans. Really it was like Heaven for those few days I spent there. Say, I think I should claim the championship on weather prophecy now; I’ve been ready that ‘Zatso’ column for a long time and I don’t think you can bet on this one. Three nights ago a group of we officers were standing out in front of our tents, after supper, talking about everything in general and nothing in particular when the subject of weather came up. One of the fellows said, "Look at that clear streak over in the west, perhaps we will have some clear weather tonight and tomorrow." Understand the clouds hung heavily overhead. I spoke up and said, "Well gentlemen, unless my signs are wrong, you’d better ‘go home’, batten down the hatches, adjust your tent ropes, for I think we will have some wind very soon, at least before morning." An hour later the wind began to blow hard and blew progressively harder all night. Well, night before last we were in the same position after supper. The sky was clear and beautiful overhead, the sunset slightly hazy. Someone said, " Well, that’s a rainy sky and the sunset in my way of thinking." ‘Ole BROOM’ chirps up with his prediction and says, "No gentlemen, we’ll have a cool clear sunrise tomorrow. That yellow tint comes from the spray blown from the sea or ground." Sure enough! The night was cool, in fact, almost cold; the morning dawned cool, clear and exotic, really a perfect day. It remained beautiful all day - the finest weather we’ve seen in many moons. Right again. What next? We were outside last night in our usual "after supper mood" talking and predicting. There was a beautiful sunset - red with a few icy looking clouds along the western horizon. Someone said, "Well, a clear day tomorrow - look at the gorgeous sunset, it’s read all along those clouds as far as you can see." Surely enough, what’s left of this "Whisk" BROOM, comes up with his usual dissenting opinion. "Fellows, that sunset is a wolf in sheep’s clothing! It’s rather dirty around the edges and if you had planned on tightening your tent ropes to much, don’t do it, for I look for rain before morning." (In case you don’t know it, we loosen tent ropes before and during a rain so that when they get wet and shrink, they won’t pull the pegs out of the ground.) It seems uncanny and insane that I should make such a prediction at such a time as this when at the very moment the new moon was hanging lazily in the western sky, the stars were bright and beginning to twinkle and the cool autumn air was as crisp as a frozen leaf of lettuce. As you might expect, though, though, this morning about 0530 to 0600 hours I was awakened by a gentle "little splatter" on my tent roof. Right again! Well, it has rained off and on all day and looks like a real "goose drowner" is coming any minute. (Fact of the matter is, it just started with wind, lightening and thunder.) Our mail has been spasmodic for the past 2 months and I am way behind, but 1 letter filters through now and then. Your papers are coming thru once in a while, but haven’t received any late ones. Just got a letter from Dale, my kid brother who has been in the Far Eastern Theater with a Fighter Group since January 1942. He is on his way home and by the time you receive this he will probably be there. I certainly envy him, but then I have only about half, as much overseas time in as he has. Hope you have a good Christmas and also that you have as good luck on your prophesies on the weather as I have this week. The trouble with me is that I don’t have enough faith in my prediction to bet on them. Give my regards to all.

- Alice HARRELL SEE, widow of the late Michael Henry SEE, died at her home in Kinmundy, Oct. 28, 1944. She was the daughter of William James HARRELL and Rachel PLESS, who came to Marion County from Indiana. She was born May 21, 1873 on a farm north of Salem. The family soon moved to Meacham twp. where Mrs. SEE grew to young womanhood and received her education at Rockhold School. On Oct. 28, 1891, she married Michael Henry SEE, and they had 7 children. A daughter, Georgia, died in infancy; a daughter, Charlene, wife of George MILLER died in 1934; and an only son, Hobart Harrell SEE, was killed in action in World War I on Aug. 8, 1918. Surviving are 4 daughters: Irene, wife of Glenn D. BRASEL of Hoopeston; Eunice, wife of John H. KETTLES of Chicago; Edith of White Plains, N.Y.; Winifred, wife of Fred C. LAWERSIEK of St. Louis; 2 step-sons, Ellis L. SEE of Liberal, Kansas; and Otis E. SEE of Monmouth; a brother, Edwin HARRELL of Meacham twp.; 2 sisters, Mrs. Florence REID of Mitchell, Ind.; and Mrs. Edward MARSH of St. Cloud, Fla.; 15 grandchildren; and 4 great-grandchildren. Mrs. SEE spent her entire life in or near Kinmundy with the exception of a year in Texas, when as a child with her parents, they made the trip by covered wagon passing through Indian territory enroute; later she and her husband resided in Shell City, Mo., but returned to Illinois within a year. She was a member of the Methodist Church, the American Legion Auxillary and the Royal Neighbors. Three of her grandsons are in the U.S. Army: George MILLER in France; Donald MILLER in Belgium; and Harold MILLER in the Pacific. The 2 former boys made their home with their grandmother for a number of years prior to their induction. In 1930 she was a member of the Gold Star Pilgrimage to the American Cemeteries of France to visit the burial place of her son.

- PFC Leland SHORT has returned to Hines Hospital in Chicago, from overseas duty in England. Leland and wife spent Monday here with Mr. and Mrs. Ruben CRAIN.

- Claude RAINEY of Alma was able to return to his home there Monday. Our readers will remember Mr. RAINEY received almost fatal injuries in a car accident several weeks ago.

- PFC Lawrence BASSETT left Friday for Miami Beach, Fla. after spending 21 days delay enroute here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest BASSETT, residing north of town. His departing words were, "Gee, these were the shortest 21 days I have ever seen in all my life." And we don’t doubt this boy’s word one bit. You see, PFC BASSETT spent 29 months in the Southwest Pacific Theater of War and this trip home was certainly a great trip home for him. Just what he will do now or where he will go now, he doesn’t know. As he says, "I’m still in the Army." Although PFC BASSETT did not display them while here, he is authorized to wear the American Defense Service Ribbon, the Asiatic-Pacific Theater Ribbon, 2 Bronze Battle Starts, and 4 Overseas Bars. He can be mighty proud of these marks of distinction and we are mighty proud that he can wear them. We certainly wish him luck where ever he goes.

- PFC Junior GORDON and wife of Texas, are spending his furlough here with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Art HOEHNE and Mr. and Mrs. Orval GORDON.

- Pvt. Harold W. JONES of South Carolina, is spending his furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis JONES near Arnold Chapel.

- Mr. and Mrs. R.C. GARNER have received word from their son, Dwight, that he was severally burned on Sept. 29th. Dwight is in the Pacific and is a Water Tender First Class. By a mistake boiling steam was turned on him. He received third degree burns from his knees down and second degree on his chest, arms, and face. He has been transferred from his ship on to a hospital ship. All of Dwight’s friends hope he will soon be able to walk.

- Memorial Services for PFC Allen BRASEL, who was killed in action in Holland, Oct. 8, 1944, will be held Nov. 19th at 2 p.m. in the Christian Church in Alma. All friends invited. (A picture accompanied this article.)

- The Annual Halloween Parade, sponsored by the PTA was held Tuesday evening. It was not quite as large as has been seen in former years due to the fact that masks and false-faces were very hard to get this year. Prize winners were:

Witch: Lela Mae DOOLEN, Marilyn ALLEN

Ghost: Julia Marsel WILLIAMS, Morris MAXEY, Virginia Sue JACKSON

Chinaman: Norman HAYES, Loretta HOYT, Gerald DOOLEN

Cowboy: Billie BOYD, Donnie CHEATUM

Red Cross Nurse: Lewis MAXEY, Virginia HELPINGSTINE, Lois SHAFFER

Red Riding Hood: Barbara Kay HAMMER, Beverly PHILLIPS, Marilyn Kay HOWELL

Hillbilly: Lois MARTIN, Zola BARBEE, Jimmy SANDERS

Negro Man: Earl HAMMER, James BURGE, Keith DISS

Negro Mammy: Loretta DISS, Albert Duane GRAY, Gary OLDEN

Fat Man: Bonnie Jane GRAY, Marceline GENTRY, Sammie JONES

Hobo: Larry SULLENS, Helen BASSETT, Carol THOMS

Boy Dressed as Girl: Charles WHITE, Jackie BOYD, Glen DOOLEN

Girl Dressed as Boy: Ruth Marie BAYLIS, Brenda GRAY, Patsy SHAFFER

Clown: Gene DONOHO, Paul WEST, Dale STALLONS

Most Original Make-up: Xon HANNA, Donna Mae GARRETT, Sarah BARBEE

The Judges were Mrs. Art COCKRELL, Eugene SHUFELDT, and Merle JONES.

- Omega: Mrs. Inez DOUTHITT returned from a visit with her husband, who is in an army camp.

- Omega: Mrs. Jason CHAPMAN and children left Saturday to visit their son, Bud, who is in an army camp in Colo.

- Mrs. Laura GRESHAM of Chicago and son, Sgt. Bill GRESHAM of Texas came Tuesday for a 2 day visit with Mr. and Mrs. H.M. FISHER.

- Mrs. Mattie CHANCE and Mrs. Dorothy BOUSMAN and son, Richard, spent the weekend in Oblong with their daughter and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Mason PRYOR. They returned home Sunday afternoon to help Seymour CHANCE celebrate his birthday.

- Meacham: Cpl. and Mrs. Lee SHORT of Hines HOSPITAL in Chicago, visited with Mr. and Mrs. Ruben CRAIN, Monday.

- Pleasant Grove: A surprise supper was given for David SHAFFER, Sunday, in honor of his 21st birthday. Those attending were: Mrs. Paul SHAFFER and children, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert ANDERSON and daughters, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert VANDEVEER and son, and Ruth Edna, who is employed at the Salem Hospital.

- Pleasant Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Paul JENKINS and family, Chuck KELL, Ralph HIESTAND, Chuck ROSE, Virgil SEE, Ralph ROSE and Herschel ROSE and families, enjoyed a birthday supper at the Pearl ROSE home Saturday, honoring Jackie JENKINS, Clyde and Barbara ROSE’s birthday, and Mr. and Mrs. Chuck KELL’s anniversary.

- Pleasant Grove: Pvt. Roy MILLER of Scott Field made his usual weekend visit with his wife and daughter.

- East Meadow Branch: Mrs. Pearl LENHART underwent a sinus operation Tuesday in St. Mary’s Hospital, Highland, Ill. Her daughter, Mrs. Freida GARRETT, is with her.

- East Meadow Branch: Mrs. Esta ROBB left Friday afternoon for Wisconsin to visit her son, T 3 Harold W. ROBB.

- East Meadow Branch: Little Miss Ruth BAYLIS celebrated her fifth birthday Saturday by entertaining several of her friends: Barbara Fay and Donald Keith YUND of Farina; Barbara and Sandra GENTRY, Shirley, Barbara, Marilyn and Harold Charles HOWELL, Gary NEAL and Larry and Ruth BAYLIS.

- East Meadow Branch: Mrs. Caddie SEE PATTERSON is visiting at the home of her niece, Mrs. Frieda GARRETT.

- Cpl. and Mrs. Gene WILLIAMS of Cal. are visiting Mrs. WILLIAMS’ parents, Mr. and Mrs. Retus GENTRY and Cpl. WILLIAMS’ mother, Mrs. Lela WILLIAMS in Alma.

- Pvt. George KEEN is here on furlough with his family.

- Pvt. Burdette JENKINS of Texas is enjoying furlough here with homefolks.

Nov. 9, 1944:

- Here’s a nice letter from Pvt. Ralph JENKINS, who is now somewhere in Germany. He says: Haven’t written you for some time, so thought I would drop you a few lines to let you know I’m well and feeling O.K. Although I have sorta got a head cold. Well Norris, I received a paper yesterday, and it certainly seemed awful nice to get it after going about a month without one. The paper I received yesterday had my letter I wrote you and also Manuel’s, but Norris, was very surprised to hear my letter was the first one from France, now maybe, it will be the first one from Germany. I have got plenty of birthday cards and I’m saying thanks for everyone of them, and here’s hoping I’m home for my next one. Well, Norris, how is everyone around the old hometown, suppose it seems deserted. Well, I got my state ballot yesterday and have already marked it and sent it in. Well, last night the Cardinals won the World Series, my old team came in the pinches and won another World Series. We heard all the games over here and they came in very good. Maybe we will all be home for the world series next year. Well, how does the news sound back home, it sounds sorta good over here. I only hope the Germans get smart before too long and give up. America is too powerful for these other countries and we have so much more to be thankful for. If you could see how happy these Germans are when they are captured. They are very happy when they become our prisoners and they say they are glad because the war is over for them. Well, Norris, you have heard a lot of people talk about eating 3 meals in 3 states in one day. Well, I can say more than that. One day I ate breakfast in France, dinner in Belgium, and supper in Luxembourg. So that is a pretty good record and that’s something a lot of people can’t say and never will be able to say. I guess I was sorta lucky to do something like that. Well, I guess the weather is pretty nice at home, but it’s sorta damp and chilly over here. Well Norris, How is Guin coming along. Guess he is still in Michigan, anyway, I hope so. I hear from my brother often, who is over here and would like very much to see him. Maybe I will before long. And would like to see Charles KLINE. I was up one day with Charles KLINE’s outfit, rendering first aid for his 37th Tank Bn., but I never saw him. I was hoping to see him, but I guess I wasn’t lucky. I read your Zatso column and really enjoyed it very much and also a Sgt. from my company read it and he seemed to like it very much. Well, Norris, I don’t know much more for this time so will sign off. I’m sending you a post card from England. I’ve carried it with me ever since I left England. Anyway, it’s sorta a souvenir in a way. Well, I enjoy you paper very much and don’t know what I would do without it. So keep it rolling and thanks a lot for the fine work you have been doing. I hope before long I’ll be able to walk up personally and shake your hand and thank you for doing such a fine job sending us the paper. So for now, I’ll say be good and careful and I’m saying hello to every one in and around the old home town.

- Here’s one from PFC Chas. JASPER, who is still sojourning in China. He says: Just thought I would drop you a few lines again to thank you and let you know the paper is still coming through. Sometimes I get 4 or 5 all in one bundle, and other times one at a time, but no matter how they get here, I always enjoy them. The last one I got as where Rex GAMMON wrote. I enjoyed his letter very much. I wish he would get to come over the hump sometime so I could see him. I got to see Dale BROOM not very long before he started home. I sure wish I could have left with him. I hope by the time this letter gets there, he is safe and sound. Tonight is my night off and I am in the recreation hall writing this letter. They have a big ping-pong tournament going on and some of the boys are beating out a few hot licks on the piano, bass fiddle, flute, accordion, and clarinet. We have some pretty good entertainment over here and I guess that is more than a lot of the boys can say who are stationed all over the country. Last week, Pat O’BRIAN, Jinx FALKENBERG, Betty EDEN, and a couple of others put on a show for us. They played 3 nights in a row so that all the boys would get to go. Tomorrow Jinx and one of her troupe are putting on an exhibition tennis game for the boys, but I won’t get to see that as I have to work. Pat O’BRIAN was a riot with his Irish jokes, but Betty EDEN was the most popular and I guess, the main reason was, she came out in a bathing suit. A white woman in a bathing suit who can twist herself up like a pretzel is really a riot over here. There was another fellow with them whose name I have forgotten, who played a guitar and sang "Senatra stay away from my Gal". That is a song you should hear if you haven’t already which I guess you have. Well Norris, it is getting rather late and I am missing out on a lot of good sleep, so guess I had better sign off. Maybe this is a good way to let some of the boys know that I would like to hear from them. I know they all like to get mail and I do too. So if they will write I will be very glad to answer. Also, if you ever come to China, just ask the boy with the Chinese soldiers who unloads your baggage which could even be me. If they know a guy by the name of JASPER, look me up, air freight, that’s me and any one who has ever seen me can sure remember a mug like mine. Thanks again, to you and every one else who helps in sending the paper to the boys. The best of luck to you all.

- Here’s one from PFC Everett LANSFORD, who is somewhere in Germany. He says: Here is some lines to let you know I am getting the paper. There is lots of news in it that is kinda old by the time it gets here, but you know it takes some time for mail to travel this far. There are some boys from around Salem, Alma and Kinmundy here that I know and I guess there are a lot more. I got a letter from Raymond MOELLER the other day. I sure wish I could run into him sometime. I have been here for some time you know, and I can’t say how long. It is a little rough here sometimes. I will say I am in Germany somewhere. I have sure seen lots since I have been here. I hope the war will soon end. It sure keeps a fellow busy ducking. It is not near so bad now as it was, and I know I’ve seen all I want to see right now. I was reading Lawrence BASSETT’s letter where he said he would like to see some snow. Well, it has been a long time since I saw snow, but I will probably get to see some later on, but I hope not. Well, I better stop for now. Thanks a lot for sending the paper and good luck to you all.

- Richard Frederick, Jr., infant son of Mr. and Mrs. R.F. KILLIE of Chicago, died at the Childrens’ Hospital in Chicago on Nov. 1, aged 16 days. Burial at Hillcrest Cemetery, Centralia.

- Lt. (j.g.) and Mrs. Carl E. PRUETT came Sunday evening and spent until Tuesday with their parents. Carl is enroute from Norfolk, Virginia to Galveston, Texas.

- Rev. Walter B. PRUETT will leave Saturday for Mass. where he will start training for a Chaplain. He received the rating of 1st Lieut. Mrs. PRUETT and 2 daughters, Patricia and Peggy will stay in the W.S. PRUETT home and with the Cecil JONES family near Patoka for the present.

- Relatives gathered at the home of Pvt. and Mrs. Burdette JENKINS Sunday in honor of Pvt. JENKINS, who was home on furlough. Those present were his parents: Mr. and Mrs. Ben JENKINS, Mrs. Nellie JENKINS, Mrs. STEVENS, Mrs. Agnes TATE, Mr. and Mrs. Robert JENKINS and sons, Bobbie and Shirley, Arthur JENKINS and Earl ALLMON. Pvt. JENKINS returned to Camp Swift, Texas, Sunday.

- PFC Lewis L. SPURLIN, Vandalia, has been given a regimental citation by Col. A.H. BUTLER, commanding the 21st Marines on Guam Island while in combat against the Japanese forces at Guam, and was responsible for the submission of information of material intelligence value.

- Richard BROOM’s Kinmundy Community High School "Hornets" lost their first games of the present basketball season to Patoka, coached by Chas. MEYERS. The "Hornets" were leading after the first quarter 11-9. The game ended with Patoka winning 33-23. The starting line-up was composed of Russell BROOM, center; Robert JOHNSON and Chas. GARDEN, guards; Calvin BARBEE and Junior GARRETT, forwards.

- Young School: Mr. and Mrs. Ellis WILKINSON received a letter from their son, who is somewhere in New Guinea, stating he had been promoted to the rank of Sergeant. Soldiers are chosen for this rank because of superior intelligence and good conduct. It is the highest non-commissioned rank of the army.

- Pleasant Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Ralph ROSE and daughter ate Sunday dinner with his parents. All called on Mr. and Mrs. Herschel ROSE in the afternoon to see little Gladys Margaret, who was born Nov. 2. Mrs. Mary SMITH is staying with them caring for her.

- Pvt. and Mrs. George KEEN and children left Friday for Ft. SMITH, Ark. where Pvt. KEEN will be stationed.

- T 3 Harold ROBB of Camp McCoy, Wis. spent the weekend here with his wife and parents.

- Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD and daughter, Ruby, visited in Springfield last week with Miss Pearl ARNOLD.

- Swift School: Clyde BASSETT attended Mrs. Mamie ARNOLD’s funeral in Patoka Sunday afternoon.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Virgil LIVESAY, Helen and Evelyn BASSETT, and Mr. and Mrs. Wess ROBB spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT and daughter, Donna Mae.

- Swift School: Velma Jean ROBB spent several days in Wisconsin visiting her husband, Sgt. Harold ROBB.

- Meacham: Charles Marlin was born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles HAYS on Nov. 1 at Salem Hospital. They returned to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ira MERRITT, Saturday morning.

- T 5 Gene WILLIAMS has returned to camp in Louisiana.

Nov. 16, 1944:

- Here’s a nice letter from Pvt. Charles DISS, who is now in Belgium. He sends us some of the money from that country, as well as Holland, which we have added to our collection of foreign currency. He says: Just a few lines this morning to say ‘hello’ and also send you a couple of pieces of this money that we are using over here. This Belgium money is very much the same as French money. The ten francs is worth approximately 22 cents of our money. The other piece of money is some I got when I was over in Holland and is worth about 40 cents but is called 100 cents in their money. The Dutch also have a silver dollar almost the same as ours which, is also called 100 pennies, but which is worth only 40 pennies in our money. We thought at first in England when we were using shillings that they were very hard to get accustomed to. I believe that the French money was the easiest of them all to use. As for windmills and wooden shoes, I didn’t see any sign of them at all while I was in Holland. A great many of the French people and these Belgium people wear wooden shoes. They really look clumsy but the people seem to walk along very nicely in them. I think the people are far more advanced in every way here in Belgium than they were in France and England. A person can walk down the street in any one of these large cities and can see almost anything that would be seen on the main streets of Boston, even to the ice cream parlors. We got our first ice cream here that we have had since we left the States. It really hit the spot too. I was also saw Luxembourg one day and that is really a beautiful country. They have a great many pine forests there and the country is all hilly which adds to the scenery. The people farm almost every inch of the land that is not in pine trees. Another thing that sounded nice to us while we were in Holland was the greeting they gave us. They all, even the little kids, said hello to us instead of the English version which was, "Any Gum, Chum", and the French all said ‘Bonjour’ which means hello. We also see a lot of the popular made cars around here which we never saw in France. Also another that was nice to see was a Cocoa Cola sign as we were going thru a very large town. But as yet, we haven’t been able to get one. Well, I guess this is about all for now, so until the next time, bye now.

- Here’s one from Cpl. Harold KLEISS, who has just landed in England. From the way he writes, he forgot to take any lemons with him. He says: I guess you are beginning to think that I have forgotten all of you. Well, I haven’t. I’ve been rather busy and on the go so much since my furlough, that I haven’t hardly had time to write to the folks. As I guess you know by now, I am somewhere in England. I had a very nice trip across, as I was only seasick one time and that happened to be the very first night of the voyage. I considered myself rather lucky as I had only to look around me and see them "heaving it up" on the deck and over the rail. We are now at our new "home". As to how long we stay here is anybody’s guess. We are quartered in buildings and sleep on a mattress cover filled with wheat straw. That is about all I’m allowed to tell, so will sign off and hit the "straw".

- Here’s one from Cpl. Phil SHORT, who has been in the thick of it for quite some time. He is now in Germany and says: First, another line thanking you for the paper again. It sure helps the months go by, and my last 24 have needed a little help. I see that you hear from several of the boys now, and they seem to be in good spirit. As for me, I am not since I left England, but you can’t expect a good thing to last forever. I have a clipping that I am sending to you and it will show that I have about my share of this mess of ours from Nov. 8, 1942, till the clipping is dated. I can’t tell you much but I was with Woodrow or close to him all the time, though I only saw him a very few times. But this will show that I haven’t always been in England the last 24 months, though I did have a wonderful time while I was there. Must close now, so thanks again for the paper until you are better paid. The clipping read as follows: "The Ninth Infantry Division has been in action continuously since July 9, driving from France thru Belgium into Germany, it was revealed today when the division was released by censorship for events taking place before Sept. 21. After a brief rest, the division was thrown into battle in the St. Lo-Periers sector where it met a German counter-attack July 10. Since then it has been in almost continuous contact with the enemy. A brief European itinerary of this crack infantry division follows:

June 18 - Cut Cherbourg Peninsula near Barneville

June 25 - Entered Cherbourg and became one of three divisions to help take the port

July 1 - Lt. Gen. Omar N. BRADLEY announced the Ninth had mopped up all remaining resistance on Cap de la Hague

July 25 - Cut St. Lo-Periers road

Aug. 28 - Crossed Marne River and swept thru Chateau-Thierry

Sept. 2 - Recon troops entered Belgium near Momignies at 11:07 a.m. Infantry regiment crossed border later the same morning.

Sept. 5 - Infantry crossed Meuse River south of Dinant under fire

Sept. 13 - Troops moved into Germany south of Rotegen

Sept. 14 - Infantry regiment breached Siegfried Line, advancing thru both first and second line defenses

Sept. 20 - Holding positions along Siegfield Line against mortar and artillery barrages, moving into new pillboxes in some sectors

- The Sixth War Loan Drive starts Nov. 20th. May we again do our part to finish this job.

- Mr. and Mrs. Ralph ROSE have a son, Robert Ralph, born in their home on Nov. 8. They now have a girl and boy.

- Mary A. TAYLOR WILLIAMS, youngest daughter of George and Martha TAYLOR, was born Feb. 7, 1866 at Kinmundy. She married Columbus C. WILLIAMS of Sandy Branch neighborhood in 1879, and they had 13 children, 5 of whom with their father, preceded her in death. In early life she was converted and united with the Primitive Baptist Church. She died at her home near Alma on Nov. 5, 1944. She leaves 2 aged sisters, 8 children, 47 grandchildren, 33 great-grandchildren, and 5 great-great-grandchildren. Nine of the grandsons are serving in the Armed Forces, 5 of them overseas. Services were held from the Alma Methodist Church with interment in Sandy Branch Cemetery.

- For the past 2 weeks, the Gulf Oil Co. has been drilling a test well on the R.C. MAULDING land north of Kinmundy.

- The Commanding Officer, Godman Field, Ky has announced the promotion of Sgt. Elwin G. INGRAM to Staff Sgt. for outstanding performance of duty. He is an instructor in Squadron Supply in the 617th Bombardment Squadron. He is the son of Mrs. Agnes INGRAM of this city.

- Thelma BAILEY, daughter of Bert BAILEY of Kankakee, Ill., and Petty Officer Frederick MORGAN, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wendall MORGAN of Dayton, Ohio, took place in the Shiloh Congregational Christian Church on Nov. 5th in Dayton, Ohio. Miss Marjorie BAILEY, sister of the bride, was maid of honor, and bridesmaids were Miss Kathryn MORGAN of Dayton, sister of the groom, and Miss Rozella RHODES of Portland, Ore. DeWeese SKIDMORE of Bellefontaine, Ohio, cousin of the groom, was best man, and ushers were Russell WILLIAMSON and Myron CORWIN, both of Dayton. The bride is a graduate of Kinmundy H.S., and now employed at the Aircraft Laboratory at Wright Army Airfield in Dayton. Petty Officer MORGAN is a graduate of Dayton Parker Vocational School, and now stationed at Norfolk, Va. Before entering the service, he was a journalist for the McCall Publishing Co.

- Mrs. Ralston D. HANNA was operated on last Monday in St. Anthony’s Hospital for goiter.

- PFC Cecil JONES of Chicago spent a few days here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank JONES in Swift School district.

- East Meadow Branch: Anne SLOVICK, HA1 c, enroute from Maryland to California, stopped at Chicago for a few days for a visit with her sisters and a few days here with her mother, Mrs. Mary SLOVICK.

- East Meadow Branch: Mrs. Esta ROBB has returned home after a visit in Wisconsin with her son, T 5 Harold ROBB. Harold spent the weekend here with his wife and parents.

- PFC and Mrs. Darrell REESE are home from camp for a few days.

- Mrs. J.A. BROWN of Alma has returned home rom San Francisco, Cal. after spending 2 months at the beside of her sister, Mae, who is seriously ill. Her brother, Ernest, remained for a longer stay. Her son, Ensign Ernest, spent a few days there with her before leaving the states.

- Mr. and Mrs. Herschel MAY and sons, and Anna MARLOW attended the dinner for Mr. and Mrs. Harry MAXEY’s 40th anniversary, Sunday.

- Miss Jean VALLOW of St. Louis is spending her vacation with her mother and family. She was accompanied from St. Louis by PFC Laverne "Pete" KEEN of Miss.

- Mrs. Lewie SULLENS entertained 12 boys to lunch on Nov. 10 with Miss Leta ATKINS assisting. They helped Larry Lew celebrate his 7th birthday. Those present were: Lester CHASTEEN, Billie BOYD, Dale STALLION, Jerry MORRIS, Jerry DOOLEN, Billie Joe WHITE, Keith DISS, Leon DISS, Garry KLINE, Sammie JONES, Carl JONES, and the host, Larry.

- Mrs. Mildred HANNA and daughter, Wyona, Helen and Evelyn BASSETT, Lila GARRETT, and Donna Mae GARRETT attended a banquet at the Pittenger Hotel in Centralia, Wednesday evening.

- James HAMMER, SM 2 c, left Saturday for Cal. after 20 days leave here.

Nov. 23, 1944:

- Here’s a short note, a V-Mail from Major J.A. BROOM, Jr., who is somewhere in Italy. He signed this letter, "Johnny BROOM, sometimes known as Whisk". We have often wondered if everything was so straight-laced in the army after the boys reached the other side. But from this remark we take it, they might have a little fun calling one another nicknames. Here is what he says: This morning I am wondering what it would be like to be a civilian! Four years ago this morning I reported for 1 year of active duty with the Air Corps - that’s a long year, don’t you think? This 4 years of duty has been interesting. There have been interesting people, interesting places, and interesting experiences. 18˝ months and overseas - riding on ships, seeing interesting places such as Casa Blanca, Oran, Algiers, Tunis, Bizerte, Naples, Foggia, Rome, Touloran, Marseilles, Cannes, Nice, Florence, Casino, Anzio, and other places too numerous to mention. I’ve known and been under the commands of such officers as Lt. General BREHERTON, General WILLIAMS and others. I’ve ridden jeeps, bicycles, GMC 6 x 6s and 40 and 8s. I’ve flown in PT-18s, PT-14s, B-18s, B-25s, C-47s, Cubs, and A-18s. So, as you might assume, I’m like the fellow in Arkansas in the filling station business "The only reason I’m carrying on is to see what the H___ is going to happen next". Best regards to all.

- Capt. and Mrs. Wayne JONES and son, Bobby, of Rantoul, spent a few days here last week visiting and hunting.

- Cadet Annette VALLOW of St. Louis, Mo. spent the weekend here with her parents.

- Word has been received here that Capt. Leo DONOVAN is now in a hospital in France, recuperating from a broken arm received while on a ship going across.

- The Gulf Refinery Co. drilling the MAULDING No. 1 to the depth of 2430 feet was abandoned as a dry hole and plugged.

- The Salem Veteran’s Committee, composed of V.E. MUSGROVE, Chairman; Edwin R. JOHNSON, Secretary; and A.W. DIETRICH, has arranged for a public meeting to be held on Nov. 30 in the American Legion Hall in Salem for the purpose of securing cooperation of all groups, individuals and employers in Marion county who are interesting in serving returning servicemen and women.

- Memorial Services Held Sunday for PFC Allen L. BRASEL in Alma Christian Church: Appropriate memorial services were held Sunday at 2 p.m., in the Christian Church at Alma, for PFC Allen L. BRASEL, who was killed in action in Holland on Oct. 5th. A large and sympathetic audience attended the service. Three selections were rendered by the Brown Church Quartette which is made up of Mrs. Clyde JONES, Mrs. SUTTON, Roy WHITNEY, and Burl HUDDLESTON. The prayer was given by Rev. WILSON, the message given by Rev. Geo. KELLY and a few remarks were made by Rev. L.E. HARD. Taps were sounded by the American Legion. The services were conducted by B.F. LINTON of this city.

- Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD received a message Sunday from the War Dept., stating that her son, S. Sgt, D.A. ARNOLD, had been wounded in action in Holland, Nov. 1.

- Mr. and Mrs. Frank McGEE of Flora have a baby boy, Dennis Roy.

- Pvt. LaVerne ‘Pete’ KEEN returned Monday to camp in Mississippi after a week here with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene KEEN and other friends.

- Pleasant Grove (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Pearl ROSE were made grandparents again by the arrival of a little son born to Mr. and Mrs. Ralph ROSE, Nov. 8, named Robert Ralph.

- Meadow Branch (from last week): Ira MARSHALL and Mr. and Mrs. Wm. PYLE attended the funeral of Mrs. Columbus WILLIAMS in Alma last Wednesday. Mrs. WILLIAMS and her husband spent most of, if not all, their married life in this neighborhood and raised their family here. After Mr. WILLIAMS’ death, she went to Alma to live with her son, Loren. Her son, Forrest, now lives on the home place.

- Green Ridge (from last week): Pvt. Raymond DOUDERA has returned to camp at Fort Riley, Kansas, after a 10 day furlough here.

- Green Ridge (from last week): PFC Louis DOUDERA left last Sunday night after a 15 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. F.L. DOUDERA.

- Green Ridge (from last week): PFC Henry WILLIAMS called on F.L. DOUDERA and family Sunday.

- Swift School (from last week): Mrs. Kenneth ROBB and daughter, Judith Ann, spent Sunday in Kinmundy at the Bert GARRETT here.

- Swift School (from last week): Mrs. Clyde BASSETT, who has been confined to her bed for several weeks resting, is feeling better this week.

- Swift School (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT and daughter spent Wednesday evening with Guy ARNOLD and wife.

- Swift School: Guy ARNOLD, Clyde HANNA, Theo MILLER, Orie ARNOLD, Cecil and Clyde GARRETT, Wm. and Russell HEADLEY went with their wagons and shucked Mrs. Annie MILLER’s corn for her last Tuesday.

- Pleasant Grove: When they speak of "Safety First" on power machinery, that’s what they really and truly mean, which the ROSE boys found out when Clyde ROSE was completely stripped of his overalls and the top of one sock even while helping his brother, Claude, pick corn with a corn picker, Saturday. The overalls were torn to pieces, but fortunately for him, they came off as he only received slight bruises.

- Pleasant Grove: Mrs. Joe MEDLEY and 2 children left Friday for Oklahoma for an indefinite stay with her husband, who is in an army camp there.

- Meacham: Mrs. Robert OUTHOUSE and Mr. Hugh COPPLE called on Mr. Edwin HARRELL Sunday morning.

- Meacham: Mrs. Edwin HARRELL was very much pleased with the lovely birthday card shower her friends gave her on Tuesday.

- Meacham: Mr. Glen BRASEL and wife of Hoopeston, Ill. and their daughter, Edith, who is attending school in Carbondale, and Miss Edith SEE of New York spent Saturday night with Mr. and Mrs. Edwin HARRELL and departed for their homes Sunday.

- Meacham: A few relatives and friends went to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Herman SOLDNER, Sunday and helped them celebrate their birthdays and wedding anniversary. It was a surprise gathering. Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence WOKER of Centralia, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond SOLDNER and Billie, Mr. and Mrs. Ervin SOLDNER and Charles and Mr. and Mrs. E.G. DILLON.

Nov. 30, 1944:

- Our community received another great shock Saturday when word came that George BARGH had just died. He had been taken to the Centralia Hospital 2 days previous where he was receiving treatment for intestinal flu. From all appearances he was getting along in fine shape but on Saturday he took a turn for the worse, and his heart became affected just about an hour before his death. Mrs. BARGH was notified and she immediately left for Centralia, arriving at the hospital just 10 minutes before he died. Services were held from the Methodist Church with interment made in Evergreen Cemetery. As a mark of respect, all places of business were closed during the funeral hour and the local schools were dismissed for the afternoon. George Holbrook, only son of Edwin C. and Nellie HOLBROOK BARGH, was born in Kinmundy, April 30, 1892, and died Nov. 25, 1944. He attended the local grade schools but attended high school in Centralia. After finishing high school, he attended the University of Illinois, where he graduated in 1914 with high honors with a Bachelor of Arts degree, majoring in Journalism. During his senior year, he was editor of the Daily Illini, the University publication. The next 2 terms, he did post-graduate work, taking up the study of law. The following year he did journalistic work on the Champaign News-Gazette, the Mt. Vernon Register, and the Centralia Sentinel. Then came World War I and he enlisted in the army as a private. He was soon promoted to Sergeant, then attended Officers Candidate School at Fort Custer, Mich, and was commissioned as Second Lieutenant. He served with the A.E.F., QMC, SC, Unit 315, in France, until long after the Armistice was signed. He was returned to this country and discharged on June 14, 1919. Upon his return from the war, he helped his father in the drug store until 1922, when he was appointed as postmaster of the local office, which position he held for 10 years. He then again went into the drug store with his father and within a few months, took over complete management of the establishment due to the father’s ill health. He soon added a soda fountain to his equipment and for the past several years he has had a thriving business. On April 9, 1925, he married with Miss Mildred PULLEN of Alma, and they had 2 sons: George Jr., a freshman of the U. of I., and Jo, a freshmen in high school. He was member of the Kinmundy Lodge. He was a past Commander of Kinmundy Post American Legion, and at the time of his death, was service his third term as President of the Board of Education of School District No. 25. He served 3 terms as president of the Kinmundy Chamber of Commerce. Besides his immediate family, he is survived by his parents and 1 sister, Mrs. Vera DAVIDSON of Chicago. (A picture accompanied this article.)

- Mr. and Mrs. Adolph OERTWIG have a daughter born at their home Friday named Janet Kay. They live on the Edgar JONES farm.

- Anson BRANSON died in the South Shore Hospital in Chicago on Nov. 23rd after an illness of several months. The body was brought here accompanied by his children. Services were held from the Church of God with interment in Evergreen Cemetery. Anson Curtis, son of Lewis and Eliza SEBRING BRANSON, was born in Farmersburg, Ind. on Aug. 22, 1871. While still a young man, he moved with his parents to Marion Co., Ill., where he lived the remainder of his life in and around Kinmundy. On Aug. 29, 1900, he married Miss Lola May STORY of Indiana, and they had 7 children, all living: Beulah PHELPS and Floyd of Chicago; Thelma PRUETT of Salem; Louis, Vera KAZEN and Ila BUCHANAN of Chicago; and Clifford, who is now serving with the U.S. Marines somewhere in the Southwest Pacific. Mr. BRANSON followed the vocation of farming, until a few years ago when he was forced to retire because of ill health. His wife died May 10, 1941. Since then he has lived amongst his children most of the time. Besides the children, he leaves 11 grandchildren; and 4 brothers: Sanford of Linton, Ind.; Robert of Sumner, Ill.; Harve of Kinmundy; and Marion of Smithville, Texas. Relatives from out of town attending the funeral were listed.

- On Nov. 23, Miss Helen Margaret PRUETT, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.S. PRUETT, of Kinmundy became the bride of John D. BLYTH, son of Mr. and Mrs. John C. BLYTH of Collinsville in a home ceremony. Attendants were Miss Clarabelle HUGGINS and Don HADFIELD. Both Mr. and Mrs. BLYTH are graduates of the Illinois Wesleyan School of Music. On Nov. 27, she resumed her duties as music teacher in the Rossville grade school while Mr. BLYTH returned to his work in the Milwaukee school system.

- Mr. and Mrs. John L. KNIGHT of McLeansboro have a baby boy born Nov. 24 named John Richard. Mr. KNIGHT was formerly supt. of schools here.

- Miss Marjorie Dee BAILEY, daughter of Bert BAILEY of Kankakee, has accepted a position as clerk in the Office Services Branch of the Radio and Radar Section, Engineering Division; Air Technical Service Command, Wright Field. A graduate of Kinmundy H.S. in 1939, Miss BAILEY held a position as clerk in the post office here for about 2 years after her graduation. She has 1 brother in the armed forces, Cpl. Ray BAILEY, some where in Belgium. Miss BAILEY resides in Dayton, Ohio.

- Meacham: PFC Ira Junior MERRITT of Camp Shelby, Miss., is home on furlough. Gene BURKETT called to see him Friday evening.

- Meacham: PFC Forrest BURKETT of Texas is home on furlough.

- Meacham: Pvt. Freddie MISELBROOK is home from camp in Virginia on furlough with his family and parents.

- Meadow Branch: Otis HINES spent the weekend here. He has word that his son, Roy HINES, is discharged from the army. Roy and his wife live in Texas, where he has employment.

- Cadet Nancy E. LOWE of St. Louis spent Wednesday here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E.R. LOWE.

- PFC and Mrs. John PHILLIPS are home from camp in Va.

- East Zion: James GRAY, of the Army at Ft. Lewis, Wash., is spending furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam GRAY and children.

- Pvt. Fred BOYD returned to New York last Thursday after spending furlough here with the W.S. PRUETT family.

- Pvt. Melvin GEILER of N.J. spent the weekend here with his family.

Dec. 7, 1944:

- Here’s an interesting letter from Capt. Cecil LOWE, who is a chaplain stationed in England. He says: We would take this opportunity of expressing our appreciation for the local information and news received through the columns of your paper. Second class mail is rather irregular in reaching us, but we have the pleasure of looking forward to it’s arrival. This is the first opportunity we have taken to write you from England. A very pleasant and uneventful journey was enjoyed in crossing the Atlantic, and it was with thankful hearts that we welcomed land. The English people have been found very congenial. Although, many of the Americans have their grievances, most of them are not serious. The British women are certainly doing their share in the war effort as most of the transportation, and much of the factory work is done by women. The Chaplain has many opportunities to speak to the factory workers and the different social and religious groups. I consider this to be a very profitable means of developing congenial international relationship and harmony. I have spoken from Anglican pulpits, which is not usually accorded the Free Churchman, and might be considered a special privilege. Our Hospital carries on some what of a specialized, and experimental program which seems to be serving its purpose quite well. There are other Patient Chaplains on the Post most of the time, but I am the only assigned chaplain. These Chaplains are usually able to assist with the services. The Sunday Morning Service is well attended. Communion Service is held the last Sunday in each month. Only recently I returned from a short leave which took me to London and Oxford. It was indeed a pleasure to visit the historic and renowned places in these cities. We saw the impressive ceremony of "The Changing Guard" before Buckingham Palace, and sat in the "Whispering Gallery" of St. Paul’s Cathedral. The ancient architecture of "The Tower of London" located at the corner of Tower Bridge takes one back to the eleventh century and in thought to the deeds and crimes of the early English Monarchs. Other places of interest were "Madame Tussand’s Exhibition of Wax Figures", National Arts Museum, British Museum with it’s magnificent Library, Oxford and Paccadilly Circus, Trafalgar Square. Beautiful Westminister Abbey boasts the honor of being the place of crowning and final resting place of many of the rulers of England. Of great interest to a Methodist Chaplain are the home, church and burial place of John WESLEY, the founder of Methodism. It offered me a thrill to be able to stand in the enclosed and uplifted pulpit of this 18th century church of his building. Observations on the damage from the "blitz’ and "flying bombs" remains for future consideration. In many ways Oxford gives a person the feeling of having come to a very old city, as the first colleges of the University were founded several centuries ago. Each of the 27 colleges has its own chapel, hall, quadrangle, library and dormitory. Five of these colleges, built more recently, are for women. The women students have only1 room each. Meals are eaten in the common hall where lectures are also given. For me, the atmosphere of these halls was not to congenial for meditation and absorption of wisdom as there was the invariable odor of fish everywhere, although everything seemed spotless and shining. Each college is enclosed, and the great gates are closed at night and securely locked. To the student desiring a secluded life - "This is It." All students wear sleeveless, short, black gowns, but the Scholar who is unusually brilliant or privileged, has a like gown with full, long sleeves. The university enrollment is restrictive and is much less than an American university. As the students race down the narrow streets on their bicycles with black gowns streaming out behind, they remind one (as our lady, faculty guide suggested) of a horde of black witches. I attended 4 church services on Sunday (rather starved for preaching I guess?) while at Oxford. Two of these were in the larger of the college cathedrals. Two were at the Memorial Methodist Church. These are a few of the many places of interest encountered during our present brief stay in England. We have little reason to complain, as we minister to the needs of others who have been less fortunate than ourselves. Still, the old USA would look good to almost 100% of the American soldiers that I have met. Two officers of Roy DOOLEN’s Group have been under my jurisdiction recently. We thus receive information from the active Theatre of Operations. We had considerable nice weather during August and September, but it is becoming worse now as winter draws near. We can expect bad weather ahead. Best regards and good wishes to all for the Holiday Season.

- Here’s one from Cpl. John E. JEZEK, who is now in Southern France. He says: Here it is Sunday evening and what a dull evening. So, to keep my mind occupied, I could think of nothing better than dropping you a few lines. Since I’ve been in France, I’ve had no papers. So, I’ll have plenty of reading some day, and soon, I hope. We’ve been in Southern France now for sometime and I must say it is a very beautiful country. The people are so nice and friendly, and I must say it is quite an improvement over North Africa. Rather a nice city I’m in, and it is fairly large. So, I’ve been doing quite a bit of gazing about. I was amazed at some of the things they had on display. So, I’ve done a lot of window shopping. Mostly, civilian clothes. I’ll think no more of women window shopping. Anything that has gold or silver in it, we can’t purchase unless we have the equal amount in return. Their shoes no more are made with leather or rubber soles, maybe, still a few. But the majority has wooden shoes, like in Holland, I guess, but do they make a noise when walking down the street. I’m sending something here I should of several months ago, honest, had all the good intentions of sending it. It may be too old by now, but I don’t think so, or at least I hope not. My brother, Ed, who is in Germany now, been through France, Luxembourg, Belgium, and now Germany, saying he was paid in German money. That struck me rather strange. I’d think they wouldn’t want our troops to mix with German people. But I guess they are limited though. I know there are several from down around home over here, so I’m keeping my eyes open wide. Met two Illinois boys, one from Salem and the other from Effingham, getting close. Maybe, if my luck holds out I’ll meet some one yet. I’d like to say hello to the boys over here and good luck to you all. They sure have done a wonderful job over here and it can’t last forever. I’ll have to sign off for now, and thanks a million for the paper. And be careful you don’t eat too much turkey during the holidays.

- PFC Forrest BURKETT returned to camp in California. Forest is a tail gunner on a B-24.

- Junior GARRETT and John MIDDLETON, of Alma, were business callers in Effingham Monday.

- Pvt. Lester McWHIRTER of Alma is enjoying a 15 day furlough from Wyoming with homefolks.

- Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Wm. ANDREWS, Mrs. Harry LECKRONE, Leuty BYARS, and Mrs. Bertha ANDREWS, of Salem; and Mr. and Mrs. Ray GEORGE of Kinmundy spent last Sunday in Marshall, Ill. with Mr. and Mrs. Earl MORRIS and Mr. and Mrs. Harold Earl MORRIS. Harold Earl, who has spent the last 18 months with the Navy somewhere in the Southwest Pacific, was granted a 2 weeks leave to be with his wife and parents. He returned to Chicago on the following Friday to go by plane to San Francisco.

- PFC Junior Merritt left Monday for camp in Mississippi. Junior is in the Infantry.

- Harold J. EAGAN and Miss Pearl GRAVES, both of Champaign, were married in the home of and by the Elder W.E. WRIGHT, in Alma on Nov. 25. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Norman GRAVES, former residents of Alma, but for the past 15 years have made their home in Champaign. She is a graduate of the Champaign High School and at the time of her marriage, was doing factory work. The groom is son of Mr. and Mrs. Harrison EAGAN, residing just north of the C. & E.I. Lake. For the past several months, he has been employed in an ice cream factory in Champaign. They will make their home in Champaign.

- The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Kinmundy Building & Loan Association was held Monday. Due to the resignation of Pres. W.S. PRUETT at the last meeting of the Board of Directors, the meeting was called to order by Vice President, C.R. ALDERSON. The following directors were elected for a 3 year term: A.H. MILLER, C.B. ROHRBOUGH, and J.N. VALLOW. F.G. ALEXANDER was elected for an unexpired term.

- Word has been received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John A. BROOM, that their son, John A. Jr., who is stationed in Italy has been advanced from the rank of Major to that of Lieutenant Colonel.

- Mr. and Mrs. Walter MURPHY of Salem have a daughter, Rebecca Ann, born in Salem Hospital on Nov. 28th. Mr. and Mrs. MURPHY were former residents of Kinmundy.

- Mrs. Florence WHITE quietly observed here 82nd birthday on Dec. 6th, in the home of her daughter, Mr. and Mrs. E.R. (Ted) LOWE. Her sister, Miss Clara SEE, spent the day with her. Mrs. WHITE spent several years in Colorado and recently returned here to make her home with her daughter.

- E. WORMLEY was surprised Sunday on his 74th birthday. Relatives who enjoyed dinner with Mr. WORMLEY and Katherine were: Mr. and Mrs. C.B. ROHRBOUGH and Mrs. F.K. LOWE, of Fairmont, W. Va., and L.C. ROHRBOUGH and daughter, Helen, of Salem.

- Dec. 6th being Lester CHASTEEN’s birthday, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Morris CHASTEEN, assisted by his grandmother, Mrs. Wm. CHASTEEN, entertained to dinner in their home, the boys in the second grade. Those present were: Larry SULLENS, Billy WHITE, Keith DISS, Gary KLINE, Jerry MORRIS, Dale STALLONS, Dean BRUBAKER, Billy BOYD, and Gerald DOOLEN.

- Sgt. Dale BROOM arrived home last week to spend a 30 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John A. BROOM, near Alma. Sgt. Dale has been spending quite some time in India and China and we know the old home sure looks good to him.

- Pvt. Burdette JENKINS has received a medical discharge from the army and arrived home last week. He has been stationed in Texas.

- Pleasant Grove: We were all sorry to hear that Mrs. Amy SIPES had received word Friday that her son, Woodson SIMER had been wounded in action.

- Pleasant Grove: Mrs. Virgil ROBINSON of Centralia moved her household furnishings to Brubaker Wednesday to store it in her sister’s home, Mr. and Mrs. Leo DEADMOND, then she and her 2 children left to join her husband who is in an army camp.

- Meacham: PFC Ira MERRITT returned Monday to Camp Sheldon, Miss. after spending a furlough here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ira MERRITT and family.

- Meacham: PFC Forrest BURKETT left Monday for Cal. after spending a 12 day furlough here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis BURKETT and family.

- Meacham: Mrs. Jennie JAHRAUS spent last Tuesday with Mr. and Mrs. Edwin HARRELL.

- Swift School: Bill GREEN attended the funeral of his cousin, Chas. HOTT near Brownstown, Saturday.

- Swift School: Pearle GARRETT spent Wednesday with Mrs. Guy ARNOLD.

- Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth ROBB and daughter, Judith Ann, spent Saturday evening with Cecil GARRETT and family.

- Swift School: Mrs. Pearl GARRETT and Mrs. Emma ARNOLD spent Wednesday afternoon with Mrs. Lou JONES.

- Miletus: PFC Ira MERRITT, Jr. and Pvt. Forrest BURKETT having spent a 10 day furlough with home folks, returned to his camp Sunday night.

- Miletus: Pvt. Freddie MISELBROOK, who has been stationed in Va., arrived home Thursday of last week for a 15 day furlough.

- Prairie Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert FORD and son, Carroll, spent Sunday with his sister, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde BALLANCE.

- Meadow Branch: Edward McINTOSH, Merchant Marine, who spent his leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John McINTOSH, returned to his station in Sheeps Head Bay, N.Y., recently.

- Meadow Branch: Verne SCHOOLEY, who is in the Navy, finished his course in Oklahoma City, was transferred to Purcell, Oklahoma. He is studying to be a Pilot. His wife will stay in Norman, Okla.

- Young School: Pvt. Xon WILKINSON spent his furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ellis WILKINSON, the past week. He returned to camp on Saturday.

- Mr. and Mrs. F.G. ALEXANDER returned home yesterday from a visit in Newton, Iowa, with their son, Xon, who was home on a 3 day pass from the army, this family and their daughter and family, Mr. and Mrs. William HUMPHREY.

- Attorney Harry MILLER of Nokomis spent Tuesday here visiting old friends. He addressed the local schools here. He was Supt. of Schools of hour high school over 50 years ago.

- Mrs. Elizabeth ATKINS is visiting in Hartford, Ill. with her daughter, Mr. and Mrs. J.H. BACKENSTO and family.

Dec. 14, 1944:

- Here’s one from Cpl. Louie SOUTIER, who is now in Holland. He says: Well, guess it is about time I was writing you another letter. Been aiming to write for quite some time and just now got around to it as my APO has changed and I want to let you know, so I can get my paper. Sure enjoy reading it for I get a lot of the news that I wouldn’t get to hear about if it wasn’t for the paper. I get it pretty good here. Well, I am in Holland now, though the people here are about the same as they were in the other countries. Here they sure seem glad that we are here. They don’t have much to eat, but they never say much about it. I can’t talk to many of them, but several of them speak English. Well, the weather here is getting pretty cool here now. We have had a lot of rain, but not so much lately. Well, I have seen several of the windmills that I have always heard so much about and most of the people here wear wooden shoes. Well, I guess I had better close for now. Sure think a lot of the paper. Well, hope it won’t be long before the war will be over and all the fellows get back home again. So long, until next time.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Ralph E. JENKINS, who is now in Luxembourg. He says: Thought I would try and throw a little ink your way, as I haven’t written to you for some time and to let you know I have another new APO number. It seems as though every time I turn around I have a new number starring me in the face. Guess it is because I am moving around so much. We haven’t been moving around so much. We haven’t been moving hardly any the last couple weeks. But, of course, we can never tell exactly when we will. I have been thinking that the war might end one of these days and maybe it will, but I believe we will still be fighting until summer. Of course, we are progressing yet taking city after city, but the weather is awful on our troops. But old Blood and Guts is making another progressive drive and maybe this war won’t last too long at that. Anyway, let’s hope and pray. It’s horrible to see our boys fighting and night and day through this terrible weather. It is always snowing and raining and about a week ago we had four inches of snow and the ground is never dry it is always mud, mud and mud. I never saw such weather in all my life and here’s hoping I never see anything like this again, it’s simply awful. We haven’t seen sunshine for some time. It might shine for a few minutes a day, but don’t forget I said minutes. This place where we are is a small farming village and all the people here know is work. The women go out and do men’s jobs and lots of the men at home would say no, if they had to work like the women do here. These women pitch hay like a man and they get a sack of feed and carry it up these hills just like it was nothing. They drive the oxen and take care of them just like you would take care of your car. They are very religious and go to church every Sunday. Talk about people being rationed, they haven’t had a pair of shoes for 4 years and also clothing, but they get by. It is really awful to see how these people live. They don’t know hardly what candy is until we got here. We give them a piece now and then and when they get it they smile and say, "Danke" which means thank you. All of these people speak German because they had to put up with them for quite some time. The people here told us that the German soldiers ate very poor food and only had one suit of clothes. They never had enough clothes to supply every soldier with 2 suits like we have. We have a boy from New Jersey who can speak German very good and he is a good friend of mine. Well, how is everything around the old home town. Guess it is just like it always was. Got to close now and eat chow, will finish afterwards. (Just got back from chow). So will try to write you a few more lines. It has been about 2 weeks since I got a paper, but suppose will get one soon. All the papers are generally a month late but just the same I enjoy them very much. Keep up the good work, don’t know what the boys would do without it. Well, Mr. VALLOW, I don’t know much more, so will sign off and read the paper, "Stars and Stripes". Well, maybe this thing won’t last much longer, anyway, let’s hope so. So, until next time, I’ll say, so long and keep the press rolling.

- Here’s one from Virgil BURKETT, F1 c, who is sailing around on the U.S.S. Walker. He says: Thought I would write a few lines as I am sending a Christmas card. First of all, I want to thank you and all who make it possible for we fellows to receive your paper. I don’t receive it very often, but that is no fault of yours, I know. Anyway, I know it is greatly appreciated by us fellows. Now to tell you a little about the Walker. We were with McARTHUR when he returned to the Philippines. We were under a quite a lot of air attacks and believe the Walker did her share. One day the natives came to the ship to trade. They seemed very happy that the Americans were back. They were clean and could speak English. The weather there is quite warm and rains quite a lot. Well, I guess that’s about all for this time, so here is wishing you A Merry Christmas.

- Here’s one from Junior VANSCYOC, S2 c, who is sailing the seven seas on the U.S.S. Killen. He says: Hello, all of you! It has been sometime since I have written to you, so please forgive. I have been kept pretty busy lately. Today I received the first paper since I left the good old U.S.A. and don’t think I didn’t appreciate it. It sure was good to read up on some of the home town news, if it was 2 months old. Mr. VALLOW, I can’t tell you where I am at or what we are doing, if I could. But the way it is it will be a short letter. I have been in several interesting places and have seen some interesting things, such as natives, etc. I will have to admit that I have seen a little action, but it is nothing to brag about. I can’t understand the boys that haven’t been across, that want to go. I know I was the same way and now that I have had a nice taste of it, I would given anything to be back in good old U.S.A. as well as the other boys, but the boys back home should be thankful that they are where it is peace and quiet at nights. During the day it isn’t so bad here at the present. We are permitted to tell the things we have gotten credit for. We have had one surface battle and in that struggle we got one Jap battle wagon, one heavy cruiser, four planes and three shore bombardments. Not bad for a little destroyer, is it? I am not bragging but I think if a destroyer gets a battleship and a heavy cruiser, I think that is worth telling people about, don’t you? But with what we have been through they still find time to give us plenty of beans, Ha. Well, Mr. VALLOW, I must close for now thanking you again for the paper and may God bless all of you and the boys who are serving overseas. Tell everyone hello for me.

- After serving for 3 lists in the navy without a visit home, Earl SEE, PM1 c (Pattern Maker 1st Class) arrived here Saturday night to visit his father, Paul SEE, residing near Omega, and his brothers and sisters in this community. Of this 3 years spent in the Navy, 34˝ months has been spent in Pearl Harbor. Earl said he was sent back to the States to be re-assigned and upon his arrival on the west coast, was handed a 30 day leave. He immediately caught a plane and flew to Chicago and arrived home just 26 hours after he was handed his leave. He arrived at his father’s home late Saturday night, went into his house, lighted a lamp, and then awakened his father and 2 sisters. Needless to say, they were very much surprised, as he had not sent them any word of his coming home. Naturally, Earl is very happy to get home and see his loved ones again. He says this weather is very much different from the weather he left in Pearl Harbor. Earl paid our office a short visit just in order to let us know how much he appreciated the Express, which he stated reached him regularly and looked mighty good to him. We know all our boys appreciate the paper, and we are only to happy to send it to them. Earl will return to the west coast after his leave expires and will be re-assigned. Just where he will go or what he will do, he doesn’t know.

- Mr. and Mrs. E. Henry SPECKER of Brownstown, Ill. celebrated their golden wedding anniversary on Dec. 5 in their home. The son Harold, and his wife of Brownstown, supervised the open house during the afternoon and evening. Present for the festivities were the 3 children, Hallet A. SPECKER of Glen Rock, Wyo., Harold E. SPECKER, and Mrs. Frank HAZENFIELD, Brownstown, also 3 grandchildren, Feryl, Glenn, and Doris HAZENFIELD. Several who were present at the wedding 50 years ago were among the guests. Mrs. SPECKER is a sister of the Misses PARRILL of Kinmundy.

- Junior GARRETT, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bert GARRETT, left Friday for the Navy. Mr. and Mrs. GARRETT have 3 sons in the service.

- Harold MOELLER, son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert MOELLER of the North Fork neighborhood, arrived home last week from Camp Ellis. Harold has been discharged from the army after serving since 1941 in the Southwest Pacific.

- PFC Derrill B. STIPP, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ham STIPP, also received a Medical Discharge from the army and arrived home last week. Darrell served 14 months overseas in Africa with the fifth army.

- Mrs. Ora SCHWABE was taken in the Linton Ambulance to Olney Sanitarium Tuesday for medical care. Mrs. SCHWABE has been critically ill for several weeks suffering from a serious nervous and stomach condition.

- An 8 lb. and 10 oz. boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. CHEADLE on Dec. 4th, named Stanley Thomas. This makes 5 boys for the Cheadle’s. It wasn’t "Time for a change yet", says Tom.

- Meacham: Word was received from his parents, Friday, that Pvt Junior James TATE was wounded in France. He had been in Germany, but was back in France when wounded.

- Mrs. Fred GAMMON has enjoyed 2 weeks vacation from the Bell Telephone Office. Mrs. GAMMON visited in Clinton, Ill. with Mr. and Mrs. Don JACKSON and family, and Mr. and Mrs. Elsworth CHANDLER and family in Weston, Ill.

- Mr. and Mrs. Wm. EAGAN were in Farina Tuesday attending the funeral of Mrs. EAGAN’s sister.

- Pvt. Floyd JONES of Washington is enjoying his first furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Merle JONES and daughter, Betty.

- Prairie Grove: Laurel YATES was in Chicago last week, where he took an examination for the army.

- Omega: Robt. SILL has purchased the Loyd FISK grocery store here and is opened for business.

- Mrs. Fred GAMMON visited in St. Louis a few days last week with her aunt, Mrs. J.P. McGRATH.

- Pvt. John PHILLIPS and Pvt. Freddie MISELBROOK left yesterday for a camp in Colorado.

Dec. 21, 1944:

- Here’s a nice letter from PFC Arthur MUEHLHAUSEN, formerly of Alma, but now of "Somewhere in Italy". The letter is also signed by Sgt. Walter FISHER, Muskegon, Mich., and Sgt. Arthur QUINN, West Orange, N.J. These boys surely read our paper along with Arthur, for which we are very happy. Here is what they say: Today, we emerged from the dugout after finishing our shift on the radio set and returned to the place we now call our home, in fact, any place you lay your steel helmet is home over here. It wasn’t too long before the mail orderly barked out the names of the lucky fellows who had received mail and between the 3 of us, all we received was the "Kinmundy Express". As we have no electrical facilities, we lit our candle stub; made sure we had adequate black-out and began to read the paper. We got a real kick out of your Zatso column and also enjoyed the various letters from the other fellows in the Armed Forces. This particular issue dated Sept. 14th, but nevertheless, we enjoyed it immensely as it was the latest one we have received. There really is not much we can say of what we are doing, what we intend to do, or what we have done, however, we are doing all we can to hasten the day of victory. We are aware of the fact that you people on the home-front are doing your part, doing it magnificently, and we appreciate the unending support, both moral and physical which you are giving us. At times things are pretty rough for us, but then there are the brighter moments which also come up. Not long ago we received 4 day passes to one of our rest centers, which we enjoyed very much. It seems rather nice to get away from the front lines, back where you can see a movie (which is sponsored by the Red Cross) and also merely roam around at your own free will. So you see if it is not all work for us, as we too, have our time to play. Once again we wish to thank you for the paper and want you to know it is deeply appreciated by all who read it. We would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a joyous Holiday Season.

- Here’s one from Pvt. Woodrow WILKINSON, former proprietor of the "Idlehour" Store in Meacham twp. but now in France. He says: As I have been receiving your paper and enjoying it very much, I want to thank those responsible for it. When I was in the hospital back in Italy, my address was changed and I failed to receive several copies of your paper and I missed it very much. I receive it regularly now. It is the time of year when I used to see you so much out in my neck of the woods with a bird dog or 2, so it reminded that I had better drop you a line. I suppose it sounds like a war has broken out there when quail season is in. I used to like to be among the first to go but am getting tired of hunting now. When we hit Southern France it was like hunting pheasants, you scare them up they would fly for miles, but now they are more like rabbits, you have to tramp them out. I have been told that it snows a lot over here, maybe in a few days we will be able to track them up and get a pot shot. But they seem just like flies, you swat one and there will be 2 come to his funeral. I noticed some of the boys mentioned the fact that it was hard to write in a fox-hole. Well, if you can’t read this, it is just because I am nervous, for I am not in a fox-hole, as they are all full of water, and the weather is quite chilly. We don’t dive into them unless it becomes absolutely necessary. Of course a nice cool bath feels mighty good when a shell lands close. Maybe I should try to tell you something about France, but I can’t say very much for I hear the women back in the states are getting jealous of the French girls. I saw where 1 woman made the remark that she didn’t like what happened on tank turrets, but as I am with an infantry outfit, all I can do is march on. I, myself, think the French girls are just like the girls in the states. There is just a little bit of bad in every good little girl. I had better ring off as there won’t be room left in the paper for the Zatso column, and I sure don’t want to miss that. Here’s hoping we will be seeing you in the near future and thanks again for the paper.

- We have received many Christmas greetings from the boys but there is a personal one for Lt. Col. John A. BROOM, Jr., who is still somewhere in Italy. He says: As Christmas draws nearer, my thoughts are more than ever with the folks at home. I’m not feeling sorry for myself but so sincerely regret having to be away for another holiday season. Dale, my brother, who has spent almost 3 years in CBI theater, is fortunate in getting home at the time, but he certainly deserves it and I am glad for him. We have so much for which to be thankful for - life, health, and the privilege of serving our country in one way or another, and at this time of year it would benefit all of us to say a few extra prayers for our days to come. My Christmas wish to you is "Merry, Merry Christmas and may you enjoy 365 happy, prosperous, and successful days in 1945. May you continue undaunted in your chosen profession and write many more "Zatso" columns. Our wish to all would add "May we be remembered in your prayers for our safety and eventual safe return home." "Home Alive in ‘45!"

- A poem was printed by A.L. VALLOW, "My Ideal Day for Christmas".

- Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe OLDEN have received word that their son, PFC Bruce OLDEN, has arrived safely overseas somewhere in England.

- Dr. Hugo MILLER Passes 80th Milestone; Been Practicing in Kinmundy 46 Years: Dr. Hugo MILLER, Kinmundy’s only physician, passed his 80th milestone Sunday and he celebrated the occasion in a very quite and unassuming way. He had dinner with his son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. O.K. MILLER. He had other invitations out to dinner but accepted this one as Mr. and Mrs. MILLER will soon leave for Florida and the doctor says he just felt like he should be with them. At the present time, Dr. MILLER is enjoying fairly good health although his eyes are becoming defective which is a great handicap to him. He just doesn’t try to do a lot of practicing on this account. And were it not for the fact that it would leave our community without a doctor, the chances are he would retire. On May 1st next year, he will have rounded out a half century in the practice of medicine. And of that time, 47 years will be spent right here in Kinmundy. He was born in St. Louis, Mo., the son of Jacob and Caroline HERTZ MILLER, Dec. 17, 1864. The father was born in Switzerland, and the mother in Germany. He had 2 brothers and 1 sister, all of whom have passed away. He graduated from the Beaumont Hospital Medical School, which is now St. Louis University, in March 1895. On May 1, 1895, he set up his office and started to practice in New Florence, Mo. But looking for greener pastures, he came to Kinmundy and opened his office on Sept. 1, 1898. In Feb. 1891, he was married to Miss Alice THIEMANN of St. Louis, and they had 2 sons, Oswald K. and Arno H., both residing in this city. Yes, Dr. MILLER has been in our community for 46 years which is a pretty good record. But we do not marvel at this because our people have had faith in him and he has had faith in us. During these 46 years, he has helped 1345 babies into the world. This is a record in itself. Dr. MILLER, like any other country doctor, has endured many hardships of which the general public knows very little about, and for which much credit is due him. Many is the time he has braved zero weather, rain, snow, muddy roads, and hot sunshine, driving a horse or horses hitched to a buggy or sleigh, trips that would take him all day or all night to make, doing without his meals and rest, just in order to be at the bedside of one who was sick and suffering. No matter what time of the day or night he was called, he went. And many of the time, he did not receive one cent of pay for his trip or the medicine he would leave. We can remember one of the occasions several years ago, the doctor was called out in the middle of the night and the roads were very muddy and frozen in places. He had to drive a team of horses hitched to a buggy. On his return home, the front wheels were pulled from under the buggy. In the fall, Dr. MILLER struck his forehead on the dashboard. Later blood poisoning developed and he was in the hospital for several weeks, hovering between life and death. For several years, Dr. MILLER was a pillar in our financial institutions. For 10 years, he was a director of the First National Bank, and for more than 30 years, a director of the Kinmundy Building and Loan Association. The people of this community are indebted to Dr. MILLER for staying with us, through thick and thin. Many doctors have come and gone but he has stuck with us. And now that he is on the shady side of life, we sincerely hope that his declining years will be full of pleasures. May your good health continue, Dr. MILLER, and many more happy returns of the day is our sincere wish to you. (A picture accompanied this article.)

- At a recent meeting of the Board of Education of School District No. 500, Glen JOHNSON was appointed to fill the unexpired term of Woodrow WILKINSON. At the same meeting, A.H. MILLER resigned as President because he did not want to carry the responsibility due to ill health. His resignation was accepted and Glen JOHNSON was elected president. At the last meeting of the board, B.O. GARRETT tendered his resignation as a member of the board, due to ill health.

- S. Sgt. Elwin INGRAM of Kentucky, arrived Saturday to visit his mother, Mrs. Agnes INGRAM.

- Mrs. R.H. PIGG and Miss Jeanne UNDERWOOD spent last week in Florida with Kenneth PIGG, S2 c.

- Frank BISONETT was taken to the Alton State Hospital yesterday for treatment. He suffered a stroke a few weeks ago which in turn affected his mind.

- PFC Perry L. NEAVILLE, Rifleman, is fighting with the 363rd Infantry Regiment in the current Florence-Bolonga offensive in Italy. The 363rd entered combat in Italy last July 4 north of the Cecina River on the right flank of the 34th "Red Bull" Division, to which it was then attached. The regiment rejoined the 91st Infantry Division south of Chianni, where it experienced one of it’s roughest battles. A battalion of the 363rd captured Hill 634, four miles southwest of Chianni, and repelled a number of savage enemy counter attacks in hand-to-hand fighting. The rockiness of the hill made it impossible for the doughboys to dig in sufficiently to withstand a highly concentrated artillery and mortar assault that followed, but after withdrawing slightly, the outfit returned and retook the hill. During the night of July 17, the 363rd, as the infantry element of a task force attached to the 34th Division, moved into a position southeast of Leghorn. The next morning, the 363rd shifted its strength to the northeast corner of the seaport, maneuvering with support of tanks and tank destroyers. That night one of the infantry regiments battalions fought it’s way through the northern districts of the city itself to be the first American troops to enter the city. The 363rd next broke across the canal north of Leghorn and occupied the costal sector from the port city of Pisa, one of the battalions entering the city before dawn July 24, and another one reaching the city of the Leaning Tower that night. The 363rd returned to the control of the 91st Division for 4 days. The regiment was on Fifth’s Army right flank, fighting as a unit of the 91st Division, when it went into action again.

- Meacham: Pvt. Carroll ALLEN of Ft. Knox, Ky. came Sunday morning to visit his wife, Mrs. Carroll ALLEN and baby who are staying with her mother, Mrs. Dora HEICHER.

- Pleasant Grove: Several of the young folks attended the charivari of Mr. and Mrs. Elwood SMITH Tuesday night.

- Pvt. Earl R. SCHWABE is here for a short stay with his family. He was called home because of the illness of his mother, Mrs. Ora SCHWABE.

- East Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Loyd HAMMER spent Sunday afternoon with Mr. and Mrs. W.F. ROBB.

- East Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. W.F. ROBB called on the Bert GARRETT home Sunday night.

- East Meadow Branch: Mrs. Velma ROBB spent Wednesday with Mr. and Mrs. W.F. ROBB.

- Pvt. Donna ARNOLD of Cal. is enjoying her furlough with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ora ARNOLD in North Fork neighborhood.

- Cpl. Jack GARRETT arrived Saturday from Colorado to spend a 20 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. B.O. GARRETT.

- Sgt. Richard JONES is here from Texas with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom JONES.

- Cadet Leon JONES of Texas arrived Wednesday to spend Christmas with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar JONES and family, and Mrs. Edna WILLIAMS.

- Mr. and Mrs. J. Lem BALLANCE attended the funeral of Mrs. BALLANCE’s aunt, Mrs. Estella MILLER BENNYHOFF STEVENS, Tuesday.

- Mrs. Leslie SULLENS died in her home in Alma, Sunday. She is survived by her husband, daughter, Marcelline, and 3 sons, James and Lessie and Alma, and Sonny of the U.S. Army, now serving overseas. Services were held from the Methodist Church with interment in Martin Cemetery. She was a sister of Mrs. Fletcher COLE and Mrs. Walter GEORGE of this city.

- Mr. and Mrs. Carroll SIMMONS have had word from their son, Harold, who is stationed in India, stating he had been promoted to Corp.

- Mr. and Mrs. Hugh COUGHLIN have a son born in Salem Hospital last Thursday named Daniel Lee. They now have 3 sons.

Dec. 28, 1944:

- S. Sgt. Dale R. BROOM, son of Mr. and Mrs. John A. BROOM, is leaving today after spending a 28 day furlough at home. He served 34 months overseas, serving in the C.B.I. Theater (China, Burma India). S. Sgt. BROOM was a ground crew member in a Fighter Squadron in General Chenaults’ 14th Air Force, and has 2 Bronze Stars to his Asiatic Pacific Theater Ribbon. After his furlough, he will report to his new assignment station at Santa Ana, Air Base in Santa Ana, Calif., where he will be reassigned to an outfit somewhere in the United States. He has 3 brothers in the Service: John, who was recently promoted to Lt. Col., who is in the Air Force in Italy, and Charles, who is a Lt. in the Navy at Baltimore, Md., and Ernest, an ensign in the navy on sea duty in the Pacific. (A picture accompanied this article.)

- Pvt. Melvin GEILER has received a medical discharge from the army and is again home with his family.

- Services were held in San Francisco, Cal. for D. Power BOOTHE, 63, in Modesto Civil Leader and dehydrating plant owner, who died Sunday after a 2 week illness. He founded the BOOTHE Fruit Co. in 1926. The plant is now dehydrating fruits and vegetables for the armed forces. He was a graduate of Spokane H.S. and the Univ. of Cal. He followed the profession of mining engineer after being graduated in 1906. He was a native of Kinmundy, Ill. Surviving are his widow, Margaret STEWART BOOTHE; 3 sons, Lieutenant Commander D. Power BOOTHE Jr., Lieutenant Tom W. BOOTHE (USNR), Lieutenant F. BOOTHE (AUS); a daughter, Peggy, and a brother, James W. BOOTHE, of British Columbia. Mr. BOOTHE was born in Kinmundy, his father being a brother to the late Mrs. INGRAM and Mrs. GILMORE, Denny and the late Robert INGRAM, as well as George and Jim GILMORE, being his cousins.

- Mrs. Edward J. HALLEMAN of Glen Ellyn, Ill. announces the marriage of her daughter, Wanda Lee, to Lieut. Lloyd L. THRASHER, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd L. THRASHER, Sr., that took place in Dyersburg, Tenn. on Dec. 4, 1944. The couple will reside in Dyersburg. Lieut. THRASHER is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. W.H. MORGAN of this city.

- T 4 and Mrs. Harold ROBB announce the arrive of Sharon Faye, weight 7 lbs. in the Salem Memorial Hospital, Christmas night. Both mother and babe are doing fine. We extend congratulations.

- Last Friday morning, just before he break of day, Ed BUTTS of Meacham twp. was driving to his work on the I.C. Section. At the same time, J.B. MAXEY was backing his car onto the blacktop, preparing to carry the mail that day. Neither driver saw the other car and a collision ensued. Mr. BUTTS was badly shaken up while Mr. MAXEY’s head struck the door post, knocking him out for several minutes. He was able to carry his mail that day by the aid of a driver but the next day he made the trip alone. He says he is feeling alright now. Both cars were considerably damaged but have been repaired and are now back in the line of duty.

- Sgt. D.A. ARNOLD Wounded in Germany: Staff Sergeant Daniel A. ARNOLD, 32, of this city, wounded by a German mine while serving with his armored infantry division in Germany, is now recovering at the 159th General Hospital, in England. He has been awarded the Purple Heart. "We were expecting a counter attack", Sgt. ARNOLD, a mortar squad leader, related, "and I was placing my squad in position at an outpost. Only spasmodic artillery fire was coming over at the time. I stepped on a mine on an embankment near a road. I was stunned for a few moments, and when I came to I was lying in the road. I was wounded in the right ankle, in both thighs, and in both legs. First aid was administered immediately and I was later flown to England." His ward surgeon, First Lieutenant Marvin S. SIEGEL of Brooklyn, N.Y., said, "Sgt. ARNOLD is showing steady improvement, and will be able to return to duty within a few weeks." Sgt. ARNOLD’s mother, Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD, resides in this city. A sister, Second Lieutenant Grace M. ARNOLD, is a nurse in a general hospital in France. A brother, Seaman Third Class Frank G. ARNOLD, is with the Seabees in the South Pacific area.

- After 31˝ months in the Aleutain Islands, Sgt. Tiny L. ELLIS arrived here Saturday to spend his 21 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louie JEZEK, and family. Sgt. ELLIS has been in the army for 38 months and his homecoming has certainly been a pleasure to his parents, relatives, and friends. He has been attached to the Aviator Engineers in the Aleutians. After his furlough has lapsed, he will report to Gigar Field, Spokane, Wash., for reassignment. Sgt. ELLIS naturally, can relate many stories about the Aleutians. The islands are barren and unhabited. But they do make an excellent base for us, which is their only use at this time. The weather is very bad which is the main hardship our boys have to endure. Needless to say that Sgt. ELLIS is exceedingly happy to set foot back in the United States, and more so, to see his relatives and many friends around here again. (A picture accompanied this article.)

- Pat ORR, Alma Resident, Accidentally Killed Friday morning near Salem by Car: Services were held Sunday in the Alma Methodist church for Mindie "Pat" ORR, 49, nationally known horse trainer and race track superintendent, who was killed instantly 7:15 a.m. Friday when struck by an automobile on highway 37 north of Salem. Funeral oration was delivered by Carl PRICE, Pana lawyer and sportsman, who together with ORR owned and developed Dominion GRATTON, world’s champion pacer, who set a 1:57 record at Lexington, Ky. Burial was in East Lawn Cemetery with arraignments in care of the Hancock Funeral Home. ORR, who was widely reputed for his acts of kindness, and for his special manner with horses, developed by Spintell, a trotter, from a cripple into a world’s champion. ORR sold Spintell in 1940 to the Midwest Stables in DuQuoin for $5,000. The next year Spintell established a world’s record of 1:59˝ for the mile at Lexington, Ky. From 1938-49, ORR served as superintendent of the race track at the Illinois State Fair in Springfield, and in 1941, he had charge of the Saratoga track in New York. He also was superintendent of tracks at Salem, Olney, Fairfield, and Brownstown. Although he has held other occupations, his work for years included trading and training horses and other livestock. He was formerly a salesman for the Williams Motor Co. in Salem and at the time of his death was a representative for the E.W. WERNER Motor Co. in Salem. He resided in Alma. ORR was struck by a car driven by John PIPER, 20, son of Mr. and Mrs. P.W. PIPER, Kinmundy. PIPER was exonerated from any blame in connection with the accident on Saturday by the Coroner’s Jury. At the time of the accident, PIPER was driving home from his work as a telegrapher for the C. & E.I. railroad. ORR’s car stalled at the north edge of Salem near the water tank. He stepped onto the pavement with a lantern to hail a southbound car. Three cars were approaching at the time, and PIPER blinded by lights of oncoming cars, failed to see ORR in time. ORR suffered a fractured skull, a broken neck, broken back, broken arms, and badly bruised legs. Death was instantaneous. ORR was born in Cumberland Co. on Jan. 12, 1895, the son of Mr. and Mrs. William ORR. His first wife, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James AUSTIN, died at childbirth. Later, he was married to Fleta SMITH. There were no children. A military funeral and burial was held at East Lawn Cemetery. He was an overseas veteran of World War I.

- East Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. W.F. ROBB spent the weekend and Christmas in Sumner with Mr. and Mrs. Dale HAMMER and children.

- East Meadow Branch: Mrs. Esta ROBB announces the birth of a new granddaughter on Christmas night in Salem Memorial Hospital. The proud parents are: T. Sgt. and Mrs. Harold W. ROBB. Harold is now overseas.

- PFC Cecil JONES of Camp Ellis spent Christmas here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank JONES.

- Pleasant Grove: Lt. and Mrs. John SHAFFER of Omaha, Neb. are spending a 10 day furlough here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Guy SHAFFER, and other relatives.

- Pleasant Grove: Mrs. Amy SIPES received a letter from her son, Sgt. Woodson, stating he was in a hospital in England, and recovering from a wound on the shoulder, and would soon be moved to another hospital.

- Swift School: Carol GARRETT and family, and Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth ROBB and daughter spent Christmas Day in Kinmundy with Bert GARRETT and family.

- Swift School: Pvt. Paul MONTGOMERY of Texas is here visiting his wife, son and parents.

- Swift School: Irene GAMMON, Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT and daughter, Donna Mae, Mary Evelyn and Helen BASSETT, ate Christmas dinner at the Virgil LIVESAY home.

- Chaplain Walter B. PRUETT of Mass. is spending Christmas Holiday with his family here in the W.S. PRUETT home.

- Word has been received here that PFC Darrell REESE had landed safely overseas.

- Meacham: Mrs. Jennie JARHAUS and Mr. Glen JARHAUS and family were Sunday Xmas dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin HARRELL.

- Meacham: Sgt. Charles HAYES of Camp Barkley, Texas came Friday night to spend his furlough with his wife and baby and other relatives. He and his family spent Sunday on Rinard, Ill. visiting his sister and her family.

- Meacham: Pvt. Carroll ALLEN and wife and baby came from St. Louis Friday, where they had the baby in Barnes Hospital for treatment. They are spending a few days in Farina with his father, Frank ALLEN.

- Joe and Mary BASS of Rock Falls, Ill., but formerly of this city, celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary on Dec. 11.

- Pvt. Paul SHAFFER of Ky. and family of Salem spent Sunday with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Guy SHAFFER.

- Lt. and Mrs. John SHAFFER of Nebraska are spending a 15 day furlough here with Mr. and Mrs. Guy SHAFFER and family.

- Mr. and Mrs. B.O. GARRETT entertained their children and grandchildren to dinner Christmas Day, except their 2 sons, Cpl. Charles of New Guinea, and A.S. Junior of Great Lakes, and Mrs. Carl HEADLEY and children of Lansing, Mich.

 

Please note!!! The articles on this web site were originally reported in weekly editions of "The Kinmundy Express" (also known at one time as "The Marion County Express") which are now located on microfilm at the Illinois Historical Library in the Microfilm Depository in Springfield, Illinois. Please note that the gleanings listed within this compilation do NOT represent entire articles in most cases, but instead, general and summarized information with special interest being focused upon data which is significant to genealogical research.

Compiled, transcribed, and printed by Dolores Ford Mobley. (March 1999) Questions, comments, suggestions should be directed to the e-mail address below.    Permission to copy,  is requested.

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Updated: 09/01/11                               Mailbox Comments? Dolores@ford-mobley.com